Clinical Trials Logo

Stroke clinical trials

View clinical trials related to Stroke.

Filter by:

NCT ID: NCT05388578 Not yet recruiting - Stroke Clinical Trials

The Stroke Box: a Patient-centered eHealth Approach for Improving Post-stroke Care.

Start date: May 23, 2022
Phase:
Study type: Observational

Although there have been major advances in (personalized) stroke treatment in the last decade, the need for prevention of stroke remains critical. Prevention of recurrent stroke is currently primarily organized through management of cardiovascular risk factors including lifestyle, hypertension and atrial fibrillation (AF). To improve the cardiovascular risk management of stroke patients, more frequent measurements of blood pressure and heart rhythm are essential. In addition, actively engaging the patient with their own recovery could lead to an improved lifestyle. Recent studies have shown telemonitoring of patients can improve care, help with prevention of disease, and reduce healthcare costs, whilst keeping the patient more engaged with their disease. The LUMC "Box" has shown to effectively monitor blood pressure of patients after myocardial infarction with equal results and patient satisfaction rates compared to standard care with less physical contact moments. We plan to use this framework for improving post-stroke care by introducing more frequent blood pressure and heart rhythm measurements. Additionally, we will provide more information around lifestyle improvement and have the patient actively engage with their weight and physical activity. In this study we will be evaluating the technical feasibility and clinical implementation of the home-based self-measurements using the Box in a post-stroke pilot setting: the Stroke Box. The results will be used as a basis for the power calculation for a future randomized clinical trial on the effect of the BOX on hypertension treatment and AF detection.

NCT ID: NCT05388552 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Neurology Department

Abnormal Hyperkinetic Movements Post Acute Stroke

Start date: May 23, 2022
Phase:
Study type: Observational

The occurrence of abnormal movements is a frequent reason for consultation in neurology. The etiologies are broadly separated into "primary causes", intrinsically neurological diseases (of genetic or degenerative origin), and "secondary causes". In addition to certain medications or toxic substances, brain damage can be a cause. In this register, 22% of involuntary abnormal movements are related to a stroke and 1 to 4% of strokes are complicated by abnormal movements. These are manifested by a parkinsonian syndrome or conversely by hypercinesia which can take the form of chorea or ballisms. Most hyperkinetic movements occur in the acute phase of the neurovascular event. The frequency of these abnormal movements is still uncertain and their semeiological description has been the subject of only rare publications. It seems relevant to be interested in the frequency of these neurological phenomena and has their semeiologic characteristic

NCT ID: NCT05387954 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Patent Foramen Ovale

PFO Closure, Oral Anticoagulants or Antiplatelet Therapy After PFO-associated Stroke in Patients Aged 60 to 80 Years

CLOSE-2
Start date: June 1, 2022
Phase: Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

To assess whether PFO closure plus antiplatelet therapy is superior to antiplatelet therapy alone and whether oral anticoagulant therapy is superior to antiplatelet therapy to prevent stroke recurrence in patients aged 60 to 80 years with a PFO with large shunt (> 20 microbubbles) or a PFO associated with an ASA (> 10 mm), and an otherwise unexplained ischemic stroke.

NCT ID: NCT05382767 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Post-stroke Upper Limb Spasticity

Safety and Efficacy of CKDB-501A in Subjects With Post-stroke Upper Limb Spasticity

Start date: June 6, 2022
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

Multicenter, randomized, double-blind, active-controlled, parallel-design study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of CKDB-501A in Subjects with Post-stroke Upper Limb Spasticity

NCT ID: NCT05381740 Recruiting - Stroke Clinical Trials

A Novel Brain Stimulation for Bimanual Motor Function and Control in Chronic Stroke

Start date: March 8, 2022
Phase: Early Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

The long-term goal of this project is to develop and test upper Iimb rehabilitation interventions that can improve bimanual motor function, or the ability to use both arms and hands together, for stroke survivors with moderate to severe impairment. This study will utilize a novel method of non-invasive brain stimulation in conjunction with upper limb training given for 12 visits over a period of 6 weeks. The study will include the following site visits: - Eligibility Screening and Informed Consent Visit - Baseline testing (4 visits total): 1 visit each for MRI, upper limb and bimanual motor function test, bimanual motor control, and neurophysiology related to control of the upper limbs - Repeat baseline testing (4 visits total) of MRI, upper limb and bimanual motor function test, bimanual motor control, and neurophysiology related to control of the upper limbs - 12 intervention visits during which patients will receive upper limb therapy in conjunction with non-invasive brain stimulation - Repeat testing (4 visits total) of MRI, upper limb and bimanual motor function test, bimanual motor control, and neurophysiology related to control of the upper limbs - A follow-up visit 1 month after the completion of interventions

NCT ID: NCT05381220 Recruiting - Stroke, Acute Clinical Trials

The Effect of Early Mobilization in Stroke Patients on Functional Status, Psychological Distress, and Quality of Life

Start date: April 14, 2022
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

the purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of early activity intervention on the functional status, psychological distress and quality of life of stroke patients. It is expected that through early activities, the degree of disability of acute cerebral stroke patients can be reduced, the hemiplegic limbs can be restored, the function of activities of daily living can be improved, and anxiety and depression after stroke can be reduced, thereby greatly improving the quality of life.

NCT ID: NCT05380037 Not yet recruiting - Stroke Clinical Trials

Post-stroke Psychosocial Recovery

Start date: July 1, 2022
Phase:
Study type: Observational

Stroke is a neurological injury that adversely impacts psychosocial functioning and quality of life. This may occur due to direct insult to the brain circuits integral to adaptive psychosocial functioning, and/or indirectly via significant disruption to routine motor, sensory and cognitive performance. Yet, few evidence-based interventions exist for addressing the broad disruption to emotional and interpersonal functioning specific to stroke, highlighting a clear unmet need. The investigators propose that 1) identifying the most significant disruptions and 2) developing a cognitive-behavioral intervention to promote psychosocial functioning post-stroke is particularly important for overall quality of life, but additionally for adherence to physical rehabilitation and related interventions intended to promote holistic recovery.

NCT ID: NCT05379998 Recruiting - Hemiplegic Stroke Clinical Trials

Neural Mobilization Versus PNF Hold Relax Technique on Lower Extremity in Hemiplegic Stroke

Start date: May 20, 2022
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Several studies about the effects of nerve mobilizations and stretching exercises have been conducted. This study will contribute to describing the long term effects of these techniques on gait, motor function and quality of life in hemiplegic stroke patients and compare the effectiveness of both techniques.

NCT ID: NCT05379699 Recruiting - Stroke Clinical Trials

Development and Validation of an Online Independent Training Program for TOR-BSST© Dysphagia Screeners

Start date: October 1, 2020
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability globally. Dysphagia, swallowing difficulty, is common following stroke, affecting about 55% of all stroke patients. People with stroke and dysphagia are three times more likely to develop pneumonia compared to patients with no dysphagia. Stroke best practice guidelines recommend early identification of dysphagia by bedside testing (called screening) of all patients admitted to hospital with stroke. Our group was the first to develop a screening tool for stroke patients, the Toronto Bedside Swallowing Screening Test (TOR-BSST©). It uses a step-by-step process to identify patients with dysphagia risk. TOR-BSST© screeners are health professionals who have successfully completed a live 4-hr training provided by a Speech Language Pathologist (SLP). There is good evidence that this training increases the accuracy of screening. However, a 4-hr live session is not acceptable with limited healthcare resources. Our aim is to evaluate the accuracy of an innovative eLearning program to train TOR-BSST© screeners. If successful, this project will shorten training time, reduce hospital resource burden, and ensure a sustainable dysphagia screening program for people with stroke in all hospitals.

NCT ID: NCT05379413 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Spasticity as Sequela of Stroke

Observational Longitudinal Study on the Outbreak and Management of Stroke Related Spasticity

COLOSSEO
Start date: June 1, 2022
Phase:
Study type: Observational

Stroke is one of the leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Post-stroke spasticity (PSS) is outbreak after a stroke and is featured by disabling muscle stiffness. PSS could manifest in up tp 50% cases within 6 months after a stroke, especially in the upper limb. Despite it is an acknowledged condition it is insufficiently recognized and treated in clinical practice. Focal and regional spasticity could improve with rehabilitation and in selected cases with botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) type A injections. The latter causes muscle relaxation and fosters neuroplasticity, which is able in turn of ameliorating several patient functional aspects. Recent literature demonstrated that PSS patients treated with early BoNT (within 3 month since PSS outbreak) could improve in their clinical status better than patients with a later treatment. An earlier recognition of PSS predictors could improve patient management. Hence, the investigators are going to perform a multicentric prospective observational real life study with BoNT, based on the best clinical practice and aimed at the early recognition and management of PSS through the identification of 1) early clinical predictors of spasticity (collected within 10 days since stroke), 2) BoNT clinical outcome relative to the timing of the treatment