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NCT ID: NCT01153035 Recruiting - Clinical trial for Breast Cancer

Excision Followed by Radiofrequency Ablation for Breast Cancer

ABLATE
Start date: June 2010
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of this study will be to evaluate, in a multi-center setting, the ability of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of breast cancer lumpectomy sites to extend the "final" negative margin and consequently decrease the rates of re-operation. During the initial breast conservation procedure (lumpectomy), immediately following routine surgical resection of the tumor, radiofrequency energy (RFA) is applied to the wall (bed) of the fresh lumpectomy cavity, thus extending tumor free margin radially beyond the volume of the resected specimen.

NCT ID: NCT01146704 Recruiting - Clinical trial for Obesity

Gastrointestinal Hormonal Regulation of Obesity

Start date: September 1, 2010
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The objective of this study is to test and determine whether a high protein diet is efficacious, safe and beneficial to curtail food intake and body weight in obese adult human patients and to establish whether neurohormonal mechanisms of a high protein diet induce an early signal of fullness or satiety in a relevant experimental model, focusing on activation of gastric vagal afferents.

NCT ID: NCT01140373 Recruiting - Clinical trial for Prostate Cancer

Adoptive Transfer of Autologous T Cells Targeted to Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) for the Treatment of Castrate Metastatic Prostate Cancer (CMPC)

Start date: June 2010
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This is a phase I study which will test the safety of different doses of the patients own immune cells which have been changed to help recognize and destroy the cancer cells. The investigators want to find out what effects, good and/or bad, it has on the body and on the prostate cancer. The immune cells (T cells) used in this study will be the patients own immune cells. They will be removed from the patients blood, changed in the laboratory, and then put back into their body. T cells help the body fight infections. These cells may also kill cancer cells in some cases. Right now the patients T cells are unable to kill the cancer cells. For this reason, the physician will change the T cells by putting in a gene so that they may be able to better recognize and kill the prostate cancer cells. A gene is a portion of information which comes from the DNA and tells the cell what to do. This gene will be put into the patients T cells by a weakened virus. It is hoped that this approach will help the T cells recognize the prostate cancer tumor cells and possibly kill them. The investigators have found that T cells modified in this way were able to cure a cancer similar to Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia in mice. However, this is an entirely new treatment for prostate cancer and it is not known if it will have any beneficial or unexpected harmful effects.