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Stroke clinical trials

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NCT ID: NCT03565185 Not yet recruiting - Stroke Clinical Trials

Comparison Of Two Different Type Robot Assisted Gait Training In Rehabilitation Of Stroke

Start date: June 30, 2018
Phase:
Study type: Observational

Investigators aimed to compare the results of rehabilitation with an exoskeleton device(Robogait) and with an end-effector device(Lokohelp)

NCT ID: NCT03563209 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Post-stroke Elbow Spasticity

Assesment of Post-stroke Elbow Flexor Spasticity in Different Forearm Positions

Start date: March 15, 2018
Phase:
Study type: Observational

Determination of which muscle is more spastic before injection of the botulinum toxin, and the application of the targeted treatment to that muscle results in more improvement in spasticity. It is known that the muscles that flex elbow in healthy individuals change according to forearm position. While the biceps brachii flexes the forearm in supination, the brachioradialis flexes the forearm in the neutral position. The brachialis muscle acts as a primary flexor muscle when the forearm is in pronation. In this study, hypothesis is that the severity of spasticity differs depending on the forearm position.

NCT ID: NCT03562663 Completed - Chronic Stroke Clinical Trials

Brain Stimulation and Robotics in Chronic Stroke Motor Recovery

Start date: January 2012
Phase: Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

Motor skill training and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) have separately been shown to alter cortical excitability and enhance motor function in humans. Their combination is appealing for augmenting motor recovery in stroke patients, and this is an area presently under heavy investigation globally. The investigators have previously shown that the timing of tDCS application has functional significance, that tDCS applied prior to training can be beneficial for voluntary behavior, and that tDCS effects may not simply be additive to training effects, but may change the nature of the training effect. The investigators have separately reported in a randomized-controlled clinical trial, that upper limb robotic training alone over 12 weeks can improve clinical function of chronic stroke patients. Based on our results with tDCS and robotic training, the investigators hypothesize that the same repeated sessions of robotic training, but preceded by tDCS, would lead to a sustained and functional change greater than robotic training alone. The investigators will determine if clinical function can be improved and sustained with tDCS-robotic training and cortical physiology changes that underlie functional improvements.

NCT ID: NCT03561285 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Stroke in Young Adults

Antiphospholipid Antibodies & Osteopontin as Risk Factors for Cerebrovascular Stroke in Young Adults

Start date: July 1, 2018
Phase:
Study type: Observational

The burden of stroke is increasing in many low- and middle income countries.(1) Around 10% of all thrombotic cerebrovascular events (CVE) occur in young population defined as younger than 50 years old (2) In the majority of these patients, the cause of the ischaemic stroke remains undetermined.(3) Arterial thrombosis is a major clinical manifestation of the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), an autoimmune condition characterised by thrombotic events and/or pregnancy morbidity with persistently positive antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) (4). Considering all patients with cerebral ischaemia, the prevalence of aPL seems rather high in young adults, who might constitute a subgroup at high risk for recurrence.(5) Through the support of the Antiphospholipid Syndrome Alliance for Clinical Trials and International Networking (APS ACTION), a systematic review aiming to estimate the frequency of clinically significant aPL profiles in the general population (no age limit) was completed. (6) The pathogenesis of ischemic stroke is complex, and several studies documented hypercoagulable states as a significant mechanism underlying stroke. (8). The latter include protein C, protein S, or antithrombin III deficiencies, activated protein C resistance and anti-phospholipid antibodies (aPLA), including anticardiolipin (aCL) antibodies or lupus anticoagulant (LAC), which influence stroke susceptibility owing to their capacity to disturb normal hemostatic mechanisms (9). While aPLA are clinically associated with a state of hypercoagulation and prothrombotic disorders, the exact mechanism underlying their prothrombotic effects remains unknown (10). aPLA are detected either functionally, owing to their ability to prolong coagulation time in a phospholipid-dependent coagulation test (LAC), or by measuring specific [anticardiolipin (aCL) and antiphosphatidylserine (aPS)] antibodies by specific immunoassays, using anionic phospholipids as antigens (11). The contribution of LAC to the overall risk of both venous and arterial thrombosis, including ischemic stroke, is now well recognized (12). While the contribution of aPLA (including LAC and aCL antibodies) to thrombosis is well established, their role as independent risk factors in the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke yielded apparently conflicting results. (13). These conflicting results could be explained by differences in ethnic origin , inherent variation in aPLA levels and in the failure in some studies to account for the contribution of covariates (14). Osteopontin (OPN) was first identified as a protein involved in bone remodelling, but later also shown to have important immunological roles. (15).

NCT ID: NCT03561246 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for CVA (Cerebrovascular Accident)

Incline Training to Personalize Motor Control Interventions After Stroke

Start date: July 1, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This study will evaluate the use of incline and decline treadmill training to address specific motor control deficits identified within different post-stroke walking patterns.

NCT ID: NCT03560219 Not yet recruiting - Stroke Clinical Trials

Association of Genetic Polymorphisms With Atrial Fibrosis and Thrombogenic Substrate in Patients With Non-valvular Atrial Fibrillation

ANATOLI-AF
Start date: July 1, 2018
Phase:
Study type: Observational

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most frequently encountered cardiac arrhythmia. Emerging data suggests that common genetic variants are associated with the development of AF. The main feature of the structural remodelling in AF is atrial fibrosis and is considered the substrate for AF perpetuation. Genome-wide association studies suggest that AF-susceptibility variants may modulate atrial fibrosis. However, the association between atrial fibrosis and genetic polymorphisms in humans has not yet been specifically investigated. In this study, we plan to investigate the relationship between genetic polymorphisms, atrial fibrosis and other components of thrombogenic substrate in patients with non-valvular AF. Primary objectives of this study are to assess associations between (i) polymorphic genetic variants and atrial fibrosis (detected by magnetic resonance imaging), (ii) polymorphic genetic variants and components of thrombogenic substrate (inflammation, endothelial function, prothrombotic state, atrial functions).

NCT ID: NCT03559829 Completed - Stroke Clinical Trials

Feasibility of Home-based Virtual Reality Rehabilitation for the Upper Extremity in Subacute and Chronic Stroke

Start date: September 23, 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Regaining upper extremity function is very important for stroke survivors to increase their independence and ability to perform activities of daily living (ADLs). Outpatient stroke rehabilitation currently takes place in a therapy clinic, however access can be limited by financial resources and transportation difficulties. The Feasibility of Home-Based Virtual Reality Rehabilitation for the Upper Extremity in Subacute and Chronic Stroke Study seeks to explore the safety, usability, and efficacy of a home based virtual reality biofeedback system to promote distal upper extremity (wrist and hand) recovery after stroke. The purpose of the study is to assess the feasibility of using a home-based virtual reality system to increase the dose of upper extremity rehabilitation in subacute and chronic stroke patients.

NCT ID: NCT03558659 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Obstructive Sleep Apnea

Positional Therapy to Treat Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Stroke Patients

Start date: June 5, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been found to be very common in stroke patients. Obstructive sleep apnea has been found to impede stroke rehabilitation and recovery. However, currently, there are few treatment options for OSA in stroke patients. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the current therapy commonly used for OSA in the general population, however stroke patients are not highly compliant with this device. Therefore, we have decided to propose a more feasible alternative to treating obstructive sleep apnea through positional therapy. Positional therapy involves using a device to prevent patients from sleeping on their backs, since this position has been found to exacerbate obstructive sleep apnea. Therefore, we hypothesize that stroke patients who use the positional therapy belt will experience improvements in the severity of OSA.

NCT ID: NCT03558542 Not yet recruiting - Stroke Clinical Trials

Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation in Chronic Stroke

Start date: June 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This study is aimed to determine the effects of an accompanying structured cardiopulmonary rehabilitation program along with a neurorehabilitation program on the quality of life, care-giver burden and overall well-being of the patients.

NCT ID: NCT03555734 Active, not recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

Umbrella Review and Updated Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Pulses/Legumes and Incident Cardiometabolic Diseases

Start date: November 21, 2017
Phase:
Study type: Observational

The European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) guidelines have not made any specific recommendations regarding dietary pulses. To update the recommendations, the Diabetes and Nutrition Study Group (DNSG) of the EASD commissioned an umbrella review and updated systematic review and meta-analysis using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) approach to summarize the available evidence from prospective cohort studies of the association between dietary pulses/legumes and cardiometabolic disease outcomes (incident cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, hypertension and overweight/obesity).