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Depression clinical trials

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NCT ID: NCT04846790 Enrolling by invitation - Depression Clinical Trials

The Effect of a Combined Nature-based and Virtual Mindfulness Intervention on Perceived Stress in Healthcare Workers

Start date: June 1, 2021
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Rationale: Healthcare workers that care for patients with COVID-19 are at increased risk for stress-related symptoms. When these symptoms are chronic, they can result in burnout and other mental health conditions that can exacerbate the current national health crisis. Social distancing can limit the accessibility of mental health services. Feasible and effective interventions are needed to reduce stress-related symptoms and promote resilience in this population, while adhering to federal and local guidelines to mitigate the transmission of SARS-CoV-2. Objectives: To investigate the feasibility and efficacy of a combined nature-based and virtual mindfulness intervention on stress-related symptoms and psychological resilience in healthcare workers that care for patients with COVID-19. Both components are reported to reduce levels of perceived stress and increase psychological resilience; however, the potential additive effect of their combined delivery is unknown. Methods: Ninety healthcare workers will be randomized into one of three groups: Nature+Mindfulness (n=30), Nature only (n=30), and Control (n=30). All participants will undergo assessments at baseline (week 0), post nature intervention (~week 1), and post mindfulness intervention (~week 3). The two intervention groups will have one final assessment at 2-month follow-up (~week 11). Perceived stress is the primary endpoint and will be assessed with the Perceived Stress Scale. Secondary endpoints include sleep quality, burnout, posttraumatic stress, anxiety, depression, mindfulness, self-efficacy, and psycho-social-spiritual healing. Anticipated Results: We anticipate that participants in the Nature+Mindfulness group will have greater reductions in stress-related symptoms and greater increases in psychological resilience compared with the Nature only and Control groups.

NCT ID: NCT04830527 Enrolling by invitation - Depressive Symptoms Clinical Trials

EMA Baseline Screening System for Therapists Who Treat Youths With Depressive Symptoms

Start date: November 24, 2020
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Youth depression is a matter of concern worldwide. It affects an important part of the young population around the world and its consequences both physically and mentally make this issue an important research field for psychologists and other health related professionals (Zuckerbrot, Cheung, Jensen, Stein & Laraque, 2018). Two of the biggest challenges that clinicians and researchers face when dealing with youth depression are adherence and the establishment of a therapeutic alliance (TA; Nock & Ferriter, 2005). While several treatments are available to relief depressive symptomatology in youths, a significant number do not access them for a variety of reasons (DiMatteo, Lepper & Corgan, 2000). In the last decades, substantial research has been conducted on how youths and the general population perceive therapy, and different methods have been developed to assess clients and therapists in order to improve outcomes and other aspects of the psychotherapy process, such as feedback tools and real-time measurements like Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) (Shiffman, et al., 2008). With the aid of Information Communication Technologies (ICTs) and eMental Health strategies, feedback and assessment tools can be presented in a friendly manner, providing a novel way to possibly improving adherence rates and TA scores. This study aims to develop and test the effectiveness of an Ecological Momentary Assessment mobile application to improve initial adherence and TA in psychotherapy for youths with depression. The hypotheses for this trial are: 1. Applying an EMA baseline screening application one week before the beginning of treatment for youth depression will significantly improve the TA. 2. Applying an EMA baseline screening application one week before the beginning of treatment for youth depression will significantly improve initial adherence.

NCT ID: NCT04717921 Enrolling by invitation - Unipolar Depression Clinical Trials

Assesment of Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer in First Episode Depressive Patients Using Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor

Start date: September 1, 2020
Phase:
Study type: Observational

The aim of this study is to assess the changes in retinal nerve fiber layer due to SSRI treatment in first-attack major depressive patients.

NCT ID: NCT04689568 Enrolling by invitation - Depression Clinical Trials

Improving Depression Via E-Health Access (IDEA) Study

Start date: January 27, 2021
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The researchers are doing this study to learn more about which online self-help resources, including a smartphone app, an online program, or an informational website, primary care patients with depression are likely to choose and whether the chosen tool will improve their depressive symptoms and wellbeing. The researchers would also like to know how likely someone is to use the resources and their satisfaction with the resources.

NCT ID: NCT04684615 Enrolling by invitation - Depression Clinical Trials

Mental Health Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Amish and Mennonite Participants in AMBiGen

Start date: April 20, 2021
Phase:
Study type: Observational

People have had to make a lot of changes to their lives due to the COVID-19 health crisis. Most experts agree that social distancing and other safety measures have taken a toll on people s mental health. Amish and Mennonite communities often have large families. They may have limited access to health care. Their lifestyle is based on interaction and group events rather than technology. So people in Amish and Mennonite communities may experience the pandemic in their own special ways. Objective: To describe the relationship between stress related to the pandemic and self-rated measures of mental health symptoms and distress among Amish and Mennonite people with bipolar disorder and related conditions, and their family members. Eligibility: Adults ages 18 and older who are taking part in the NIMH AMBiGen study (80-M-0083). Design: Participants will be mailed 4 surveys. One survey will ask about depression symptoms. One survey will ask about mania symptoms. One survey will assess a broad range of psychological problems. One survey will assess the impact of COVID-19 on their mental health. They will fill out the surveys 4 times over 24 months. The surveys will not include participants names, just codes. This will help protect privacy. Data collected in 80-M-0083 will be used. This includes data about participants genes, medical conditions, and assessments. Participants will get an 800 number they can call to speak to the research team. They can also write to the team if they prefer. Participants who wish will get referrals for mental health services. Participation will last up to 24 months. There will be an option for recontact in the future.

NCT ID: NCT04662021 Enrolling by invitation - Clinical trials for Anxiety Depression Disorder

Aerobic Training Versus Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Management of Anxiety

Start date: December 10, 2020
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Anxiety and depression disorders (ADD) have the highest overall prevalence rate among psychiatric disorders in young females. Its manifestations are disabling, distressing a substantial negative impact on the quality of life. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of cognitive-behavioral therapy and physical therapy on female students with mild to moderate anxiety and depression.

NCT ID: NCT04639557 Enrolling by invitation - Clinical trials for Dual-generation Intervention for Mothers With Depression

Building Regulation in Dual Generations - Telehealth Model

BRIDGE
Start date: September 1, 2020
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Families who experience maternal mental illness and a variety of chronic stressors are currently underserved by the parenting programs. The investigators propose that impairments in maternal self-regulation, which result in unsupportive parenting, directly impact children's own self-regulation and neurobiology, leading to risk for intergenerational transmission of mental illness. The objective of this study is to develop and evaluate a program that is targeted at improving underlying self-regulatory mechanisms in both mothers with depression and their 3- to 5-year-old children. It is hypothesized that children exposed to maternal mental illness will have greater self-regulatory deficits across emotional and behavioural domains compared to children not exposed to mental illness. The effects of maternal mental illness are expected to be compounded for children of mothers reporting a higher degree of chronic stressors, including poverty, housing instability, violence, and low social support. Further, it is hypothesized that taking a dual-generation intervention approach to addressing self-regulatory mechanisms underlying psychopathology at the level of the mother, child, and dyad (i.e. parenting interactions) will improve both maternal capacities and child outcomes. A feasibility study has been conducted in-person (NCT04347707). Results from this trial showed positive effects on child and mother well-being as well as parenting skills. Our current study will be conducted remotely due to the COVID-19 pandemic to adhere to public health guidelines to reduce in-person contact and physical distance. The objectives for this study are two-fold: 1) establish a better understanding of the self-regulatory processes that are altered in preschool-aged children exposed to maternal mental illness, and determine the mediating role of parenting behaviours, as well as the moderating impact of chronic stress exposure; and 2) evaluate a novel dual-generation intervention for mothers with mental illness using a virtual format and their 3- to 5-year-old children based on existing gold-standard evidence-based approaches.

NCT ID: NCT04635618 Enrolling by invitation - Depression Clinical Trials

Psychotherapy Strategies for the Treatment of Professionals and Students From Essential Services With High Levels of Emotional Distress in the Context of COVID-19

Start date: November 5, 2020
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The study consists in a pragmatic superiority randomized controlled trial comparing different strategies of psychotherapy for professionals and students from essential services with high levels of emotional distress during the COVID-19 pandemic in Brazil. Therapeutic strategies to be evaluated are Brief Cognitive Behavioral Telepsychotherapy, Brief Interpersonal Telepsychotherapy and Telepsychoeducation, as an active control. Note: This study was approved by the Ethics and Research Committee of the Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre and is originally registered at Plataforma Brasil, a Brazilian study registration platform (under CAAE: 30608420.5.0000.5327). Recruitment began in May 28th 2020.

NCT ID: NCT04632082 Enrolling by invitation - COVID Clinical Trials

Telepsychoeducation for the Prevention of Emotional Distress in Professionals and Students From Essential Services in the Context of COVID-19

Start date: November 5, 2020
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

A pragmatic superiority randomized controlled trial comparing Telepsychoeducation plus personalized videos vs. Telepsychoeducation without personalized videos for the prevention of future emotional distress in professionals and students from essential services with low to moderate levels of emotional distress in Brazil. Note: This study was approved by the Ethics and Research Committee of the Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre and is originally registered at Plataforma Brasil, a Brazilian study registration platform (under CAAE: 30608420.5.0000.5327). Recruitment began in May 28th 2020.

NCT ID: NCT04609371 Enrolling by invitation - Depression, Anxiety Clinical Trials

PanDirect: Self-care Tools and Telephone Coaching for Depression and Anxiety During Pandemics

Start date: October 21, 2020
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

During pandemics older adults with chronic physical conditions are a particularly vulnerable population for unmet mental health needs. This is a consequence of a number of factors which include decreased access to their doctors because of restrictions in visits in order to decrease risk of disease transmission and because doctors are seconded to provide medical services in areas of high priority. Since Public Health authorities worry that pandemics may be a reality of the future, this study is being operationalized during the present COVID-19 pandemic in order to see what can be learned about different ways to provide mental health care under such constraints. The study offers evidence-based approaches to managing feelings of anxiety or depression that may have existed prior to the onset of a pandemic, or that have arisen during a pandemic. It uses principles of cognitive behavioural therapy in which participants are offered self-care tools to help them develop strategies for dealing with their various symptoms. These tools have already been shown by the team to be effective in other contexts in studies DIRECT-sc (Effectiveness of a supported self-care intervention for depression compared to an unsupported intervention in older adults with chronic physical illnesses) and CanDIRECT (Effectiveness of a telephone-supported depression self-care intervention for cancer survivors). The present study, PanDIRECT (Assisting Family Physicians with Gaps in Mental Health Care Generated by the COVID-19 Pandemic), aims to answer the following questions: 1. Can these tools be used in the community care of mental health problems during pandemics? 2. Are they acceptable to patients? 3. Using a randomized control trial, does lay-coaching of use of these tools improve their use and patient outcomes? 4. Do family practitioners value patient information sent to them at the end of the trial