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Depressive Symptoms clinical trials

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NCT ID: NCT04851366 Recruiting - Depressive Symptoms Clinical Trials

Selective Prevention Transdiagnostic Intervention for At-risk Adolescents

PROCARE
Start date: September 1, 2020
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Emotional disorders (anxiety and/or depression) are severely undiagnosed and untreated despite being among the most common mental disorders, particularly at a young age. Half of all mental disorders begin by age 14; three-quarters by age 24, which makes adolescence a particularly crucial stage. In adolescence, prodromal signs of mental disorders and even full-blown clinical conditions often remain undetected, undiagnosed and untreated. However, there is an absence of evidence-based protocols to reach at-risk youth for developing emotional disorders. There is an urgent need for a paradigm shift by developing intervention protocols to early identify and treat at-risk adolescents, thus preventing them from developing severe mental disorders later on in life. Mental health selective prevention is key to helping at-risk adolescents thrive before emotional disorder evolves. To cover this gap, PROCARE is conceptualized as a modularized selective preventive programme for adolescents aged 12 to 18 years. Using personalized medicine approach, PROCARE will allow to tailor intervention protocols according to the particular needs of an individual, but also to identify vulnerable people according to risk factors. Adolescents will be stratified based on risk and resilience status and allocated to a 3-arm intervention trial, delivered as a group, face-to-face or telehealth format, depending on Covid19 restrictions imposed by government. By the very first time, PROCARE as selective intervention for at-risk adolescents will deliver specific add-on modules to tackle risk factors evidenced by adolescents, along with a core intervention. The PROCARE protocol aims to reduce the effect of risk factors and enhance protective factors that will eventually lead to lasting positive effects for adolescents. PROCARE will combine quantitative analysis, with special attention to vulnerable groups in a sex/gender disaggregated way. The PROCARE project is expected to have a far impact ultimately contributing to preventing and reducing the prevalence of mental disorders in the young. The outcomes of PROCARE will contribute to identifying and treating adolescents at risk for emotional mental at an early stage, before they incur personal, societal and economic cost. PROCARE will be culturally-adapted and implemented as a multicenter Randomized-Controlled Trial (RCT). PROCARE will be designed to be an acceptable, scalable, and sustainable selective prevention program.

NCT ID: NCT04841603 Not yet recruiting - Anxiety Clinical Trials

Brief Digital CBT for Mood and Anxiety Symptoms in Acute Psychiatric Inpatients

Start date: April 2021
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

A randomized control trial examining the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of providing access to the MindShift CBT mobile app via tablet for acute psychiatric inpatients.

NCT ID: NCT04840173 Recruiting - Depressive Symptoms Clinical Trials

Beyond Listening: A Music-based Intervention

Start date: August 1, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Study will be conducted to determine if caregivers who use music at home will feel less burden and whether the person they are caring for will demonstrate decreased symptoms of dementia. Caregivers will participate in a series of psycho-educational trainings for six weeks. During this time, caregivers will learn how to use singing, music listening and music with movement with their family member. Caregivers should feel less stressed and a decreased sense of burden. The care recipient should appear happier with less occurrences of depression or restlessness.

NCT ID: NCT04837573 Not yet recruiting - Depression Clinical Trials

Feasibility & Acceptability of a Virtual Sister Circle Intervention for Black Women With Depressive Symptoms

Start date: July 2021
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of a protocol for middle- and older-aged Black women with depressive symptoms.

NCT ID: NCT04832451 Completed - Depressive Symptoms Clinical Trials

Effects of Interpersonal Relational Role Analysis

Start date: November 6, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Introduction: Interpersonal Relational Role Analysis (IRRA) is a psychosocial group intervention that allows individuals to see the problems they experience in interpersonal relationships and interactions in the group environment and to be handled together with group members. Aim: The present study aims to investigate the effects of IRRA on nursing students' depressive symptoms and coping styles. Method: This study was conducted with randomized controlled, pre-test-post-test control group design and follow-up test patterns. Students with depressive symptoms were randomly assigned to control (n=10) or intervention groups (n=10). Intervention group students received 21 weeks of IRRA intervention. Results: It was determined that IRRA had a positive effect on nursing students' depressive symptoms and coping styles. Discussion: This study is the first to evaluate the effects of IRRA on depressive symptoms and coping styles. Our study provides evidence on the effectiveness of IRRA in reducing the depressive symptoms of nursing students and in managing stress. Implications for Practice: IRRA is a practical and useful intervention that mental health nurses can incorporate and use in their clinical practice while helping individuals to become aware of problems in relationships and roles that may impair their mental health.

NCT ID: NCT04830527 Enrolling by invitation - Depressive Symptoms Clinical Trials

EMA Baseline Screening System for Therapists Who Treat Youths With Depressive Symptoms

Start date: November 24, 2020
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Youth depression is a matter of concern worldwide. It affects an important part of the young population around the world and its consequences both physically and mentally make this issue an important research field for psychologists and other health related professionals (Zuckerbrot, Cheung, Jensen, Stein & Laraque, 2018). Two of the biggest challenges that clinicians and researchers face when dealing with youth depression are adherence and the establishment of a therapeutic alliance (TA; Nock & Ferriter, 2005). While several treatments are available to relief depressive symptomatology in youths, a significant number do not access them for a variety of reasons (DiMatteo, Lepper & Corgan, 2000). In the last decades, substantial research has been conducted on how youths and the general population perceive therapy, and different methods have been developed to assess clients and therapists in order to improve outcomes and other aspects of the psychotherapy process, such as feedback tools and real-time measurements like Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) (Shiffman, et al., 2008). With the aid of Information Communication Technologies (ICTs) and eMental Health strategies, feedback and assessment tools can be presented in a friendly manner, providing a novel way to possibly improving adherence rates and TA scores. This study aims to develop and test the effectiveness of an Ecological Momentary Assessment mobile application to improve initial adherence and TA in psychotherapy for youths with depression. The hypotheses for this trial are: 1. Applying an EMA baseline screening application one week before the beginning of treatment for youth depression will significantly improve the TA. 2. Applying an EMA baseline screening application one week before the beginning of treatment for youth depression will significantly improve initial adherence.

NCT ID: NCT04822194 Not yet recruiting - Depressive Symptoms Clinical Trials

Neural Mechanisms of Enhancing Emotion Regulation in Bereaved Spouses

Start date: May 2021
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This study investigates the underlying mechanisms of a novel emotion regulation intervention among recently bereaved spouses. More specifically, this study examines how thinking about an emotional stimulus in a more adaptive way can affect the relationship between psychological stress, psychophysiological biomarkers of adaptive cardiac response, and brain activity. The emotion regulation strategy targeted is reappraisal, specifically reappraisal-by-distancing (i.e., thinking about a negative situation in a more objective, impartial way) versus reappraisal-by-reinterpretation (i.e., thinking about a better outcome for a negative situation than what initially seemed apparent). The study seeks to determine if relatively brief, focused reappraisal training in bereaved spouses will result in reduction of self-reported negative affect, increases in respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA; a measure of heart rate variability reflecting adaptive cardiac vagal tone), and changes in neural activity over time. Reappraisal-by-distancing is expected to lead to greater changes in these variables relative to reappraisal-by-reinterpretation. Additionally, it is expected that across time decreases in self-reported negative affect, increases in RSA, and changes in neural activity will in turn lead to reductions in depressive symptoms and grief rumination. Finally, it is expected that distancing training will lead to reductions in depressive symptoms and grief rumination that are mediated by changes in the targeted neurobiological and behavioral mechanisms.

NCT ID: NCT04815681 Recruiting - Anxiety Clinical Trials

Evaluating an Online Wellness Intervention for Greek Adolescents

Start date: March 22, 2021
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The investigators are evaluating the effects of an online single-session mental health intervention (the Common Elements Toolbox; COMET). To evaluate COMET, the investigators are conducting a randomized controlled trial with Greek adolescents attending high school in the Attica region in Greece. Students will be randomized to the COMET condition or to an active control condition. Primary outcome measures (depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms, subjective well-being) will be measured at two weeks post-intervention, four weeks post-intervention, and eight weeks post-intervention. The investigators will evaluate COMET as a universal intervention (using the full sample) and as a targeted intervention (analyzing those who reported elevated depressive symptoms or anxiety symptoms at baseline).

NCT ID: NCT04804917 Recruiting - Depressive Symptoms Clinical Trials

3-year Follow-up of the Mind My Mind RCT

MindMyMindFU
Start date: March 22, 2021
Phase:
Study type: Observational

This is a three-year follow up of a previously completed randomized clinical trial (RCT) of a transdiagnostic cognitive and behavioral (CBT) program ("Mind My Mind" [MMM]) compared to management as usual (MAU) in youth with emotional and behavioral problems. The effectiveness trial (Clinical Trials Identifier: NCT03535805) evaluated an intervention for help-seeking youth with emotional and behavioral health problems below the threshold for referral to specialized treatment. The experimental intervention MMM consisted of 9-13 weekly, individual therapy sessions delivered by psychologists in a non-specialist school-based setting. The CBT-methods were organized in modules for anxiety, depression and/or behavioral problems, and the therapy was completed within 17 weeks. The MAU was enhanced by two care-coordination visits to help coordinate the usual care in the four municipalities in Denmark. The trial was conducted in four diverse municipalities in Denmark. The aim of this study is to determine the long-term effects of the transdiagnostic, modular CBT program ("Mind My Mind" [MMM]) compared to management as usual (MAU). The three-year follow-up of the RCT of MMM versus MAU is nested in a larger study of help-seeking youth screened for eligibility and stratified into three groups with increasing severity of problems. Youths with an intermediate level of problems were included in the RCT. We screened 573 help-seeking youths, and we included and randomized a total of 396 youths (age 6-16 years, with anxiety, depressive symptoms, and/or behavioral problems) to MMM (n=197) or MAU (n=199). The study participants comprise the 396 youths and their parents who participated in the RCT. We will use the help-seeking population and the background population in the four municipalities as reference groups. The follow-up study does not include an intervention. The long-term outcome of MMM versus MAU will be investigated using parent-reported questionnaires administered in average three years after random allocation to intervention. All study participants are followed in the Danish national registries.

NCT ID: NCT04787809 Recruiting - Anxiety Clinical Trials

Living Well: A Digital ACT Intervention

Start date: February 19, 2021
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Depression and anxiety are frequently comorbid and share mechanisms contributing to dysfunction. Transdiagnostic approaches, such as Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, streamline intervention and allow a broader population to benefit in a cost-effective fashion. Brief ACT interventions targeting at-risk individuals have the potential to prevent negative outcomes. Delivering these in a digital format overcomes attitudinal and structural barriers to accessing treatment.