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Stroke, Acute clinical trials

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NCT ID: NCT03634748 Recruiting - Stroke, Acute Clinical Trials

Thrombolysis in stRoke With Unknown onSet Based on noncontrasT CT

TRUST CT
Start date: September 1, 2017
Phase:
Study type: Observational

Multicentric, observational, registry-based study of 0.9 mg/kg i.v. thrombolysis in wake-up stroke or stroke with unknown onset based on non-contrast CT appearance only

NCT ID: NCT03633422 Recruiting - Stroke, Acute Clinical Trials

Evaluation of Stroke Patient Screening

Start date: September 25, 2017
Phase:
Study type: Observational [Patient Registry]

Background and Rationale: Traditionally, stroke rehabilitation studies have been performed in stroke patients beyond the first one to three months poststroke [Stinear et al. 2013; Veerbeek et al. 2014]. Acknowledging that early stroke rehabilitation should be initiated soon after stroke onset to optimize stroke outcomes, it is has been stressed that stroke rehabilitation trials should be initiated within the first month [Stinear 2013]. Early stroke rehabilitation trials face difficulties regarding patient recruitment with corresponding low enrollment rates [AVERT 2015; Winters 2015]. Explanations are for example priority given to (sub)acute medical interventions, highly dynamic situation at a stroke unit, and a more rapid change in patients' abilities when compared to patients in later stages poststroke. With the low enrollment rates (~7%), the generalizability of study results is questionable. Participant screening methods and procedures for research eligibility are part of the patient selection and recruitment process in clinical trials. However, no information is available regarding screening procedures and methods for these early initiated stroke rehabilitation trials, including reasons for not enrolling patients. This knowledge is essential to improve screening procedures and methods, in order to optimize patient enrollment and with that, increase the generalizability of study results. Objective: The objective of this project is to evaluate screening methods and procedures for stroke rehabilitation research. Study Design: Observational study

NCT ID: NCT03620370 Not yet recruiting - Stroke, Acute Clinical Trials

Normobaric Hyperoxia Combined With Reperfusion for Acute Ischemic Stroke

Start date: September 1, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

NBO is a nonpharmacological measure of neuroprotection. The purpose of our study is to evaluate the safety and efficiency of NBO(Normobaric hyperoxia) in the acute ischemic stroke patients who received endovascular treatment. Looking for more clinical evidence for the ischemic stroke patients who will be treated with NBO in the future.

NCT ID: NCT03618290 Not yet recruiting - Stroke, Acute Clinical Trials

Plasma Free Fatty Acids Profile As A Diagnostic Tool For Acute Ischemic Stroke

Start date: August 30, 2018
Phase:
Study type: Observational

The purpose of the research is to use plasma free fatty acid profiling as a biomarker for ischemic stroke. The plasma free acid profile will be specifically and significantly changed in early stages upon stroke onset, and correlate with the stroke volume and progression determined by imaging techniques.

NCT ID: NCT03602326 Completed - Ischemic Stroke Clinical Trials

Neurodevelopmental Therapy-Bobath Approach in The Early Term of Stroke; Safe and Effective

Start date: May 1, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Early term rehabilitation initiated after stroke should be based on motor learning principles and neural plasticity. To achieve motor learning and neural plasticity, exercises consisting of intense and repetitive training should be given according to the patients' functional level. The neurodevelopmental treatment-Bobath (NDT_B) approach is based on motor learning principles. In literature, studies that show the early term effects of NDT-B on functional recovery are inadequate. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects NDT-B applied in the early term of stroke, on postural control, functional movement, balance and activities of daily living.

NCT ID: NCT03592563 Not yet recruiting - Stroke Clinical Trials

CUHK Brain Health Longitudinal Study

BHS
Start date: September 1, 2018
Phase:
Study type: Observational

The goal of this study is to develop a large longitudinal cohort of individuals diagnosed with or at high risk for brain diseases (both neurological and psychiatric in nature), in order to identify risk factors that contribute to neurological and psychiatric diseases over time. The investigators seek to capture relevant information from medical records, electronically administered questionnaires and follow up phone-based interviews. The investigators expect to eventually have sufficient power from our dataset to examine risk factors for a variety of brain disorders, both individually and in aggregate. Our ultimate goal is to offer scientifically validated ways to preserve and promote brain health by working with our patients' needs and tracking their progress over time.

NCT ID: NCT03574467 Completed - Stroke, Acute Clinical Trials

Functional Outcomes of The Bobath Approach on Patients With Brain Tumors: Comparison With Stroke Patients

Start date: February 15, 2018
Phase:
Study type: Observational

The aim of this study is to examine the functional recovery results of the Bobath (NDT) approach in patients with primary brain tumors and compare the results with those of stroke patients.

NCT ID: NCT03574038 Not yet recruiting - Stroke, Acute Clinical Trials

Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation as a Neuroprotection in Acute Stroke

TESSERACT
Start date: September 1, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This proposal is a prospective, single-center, dose-escalation safety, tolerability, feasibility and potential efficacy study of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in acute stroke patients with substantial salvageable penumbra due to a large vessel occlusion who are ineligible for intravenous thrombolysis and endovascular therapy.

NCT ID: NCT03569059 Recruiting - Stroke, Acute Clinical Trials

Robot Assisted Virtual Rehabilitation for the Hand Post Stroke (RAVR)

RAVR
Start date: July 1, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This study investigates the effects of intensive, high dosage task and impairment based training of the hemiparetic hand, using haptic robots integrated with complex gaming and virtual reality simulations. There is a time-limited period of post-ischemic heightened neuronal plasticity during which intensive training may optimally affect the recovery of motor skills, indicating that the timing of rehabilitation is as important as the dosing. However, recent literature indicates a controversy regarding both the value of intensive, high dosage as well as the optimal timing for therapy in the first two months after stroke. This study is designed to empirically investigate this controversy. It is evident that providing additional, intensive therapy during the acute rehabilitation stay is more complicated to implement and difficult for patients to tolerate, than initiating it in the outpatient setting, immediately after discharge. The robotic/VR system is specifically designed to deliver hand and arm training when motion and strength are limited, using adaptive algorithms to drive individual finger movement, gain adaptation and workspace modification to increase finger and arm range of motion, and haptic and visual feedback from mirrored movements to reinforce motor networks in the lesioned hemisphere.

NCT ID: NCT03545477 Recruiting - Parkinson Disease Clinical Trials

Assessment of the Rehabilitative Effects of Curved-walking Training in Stroke, Parkinson and Orthopaedic Populations

Start date: January 1, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The recovery of walking ability is crucial to promote independence in daily living and is one of the major goal of neuromotor rehabilitation. Currently, standard rehabilitative programs are usually based on straight-walking training (SWT) and the assessment of their effects is performed through functional scales based on straight-walking trajectories, e.g. Timed Up and Go (TUG), 10 meters walking test (10mWT). Curved-walking training (CWT) may be interesting to provide an ecological and challenging context during rehabilitation. Indeed, CWT is based on demanding neural processes that drive an asymmetrical contribution at lower limb level, challenging balance ability and complex adaptation such as body weight shifting in response to centrifugal force and production of different step lengths. Up to now, literature has investigated CWT in healthy adults in terms of muscular activation, kinematics and kinetics of the movement. Results showed that CWT needs a different biomechanical strategy with respect to SWT. Nevertheless CWT has not been investigated in pathological adults. The present study aims at assessing the effectiveness of a rehabilitative physical therapy based on CWT with respect to traditional SWT for the recovery of locomotor abilities in neurological and orthopaedic patients. The hypothesis is that a training based on curved-walking is ecologically meaningful and may be superior with respect to standard training in improving balance, walking abilities, and independence in activity of daily live of patients. A secondary aim of the project is to propose an innovative functional scale based on the timed up and go on curved trajectory (CTUG), and to determine its reliability and responsiveness, establishing the minimum Detectable Change (MDC) and the Minimal Clinically Important Difference (MCID). A single-blind randomized controlled study is being carried out on three different populations: - Post-acute stroke patients - Idiopathic Parkinson Disease - Femoral fracture A healthy group is also being recruited to provide reference values of CTUG. For each of the three populations, subjects are randomized into two groups. The experimental one performs a novel rehabilitative program composed by a 30-minute training on curved trajectory ("S" trajectory composed by two semicircle with a radius of 1.2 m) in addition to usual care. The control group performs an equal dose of traditional treatment on straight trajectories. Both groups undergo 20 90-minutes sessions of training (three times a week for seven weeks). Participants are evaluated at baseline (T0), after training (T1), and at a three-months follow-up visit (T2). The primary outcome measure is the 10mWT (minimal clinically important difference of 0.16 m/s identified by Tilson and colleagues). On the basis of this measure, a sample size of 70 subjects for each population was computed.