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NCT ID: NCT04851444 Recruiting - Healthy Clinical Trials

A Study of SI-F019 in Healthy Participants

Start date: April 14, 2021
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

To evaluate the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetic properties of a single intravenous administration of SI-F019 recombinant human bivalent ACE2-Fc fusion protein injection in healthy participants, and provide a basis for the design of subsequent clinical trials.

NCT ID: NCT04850339 Recruiting - Healthy Clinical Trials

First in Human Study of ANXV (Recombinant Human Annexin A5) in Healthy Volunteers

Start date: December 21, 2020
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This is an adaptive, randomised, double-blind, single-centre, placebo-controlled phase I, First in Human study designed to evaluate the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of single and multiple intravenous dosing of ANXV in healthy male subjects.

NCT ID: NCT04846387 Recruiting - Healthy Clinical Trials

Mapping of the Human Brainstem During Continence and Micturition: Noninvasive 7-T fMRI Study

Start date: January 18, 2021
Phase:
Study type: Observational

The lower urinary tract (bladder, bladder neck, urethra and urethral sphincter) has two functions: Storage (Continence) and voiding (micturition). Lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD) includes symptoms in the storage phase (such as urinary frequency, urgency, incontinence) or micturition phase (such as voiding dysfunction, hesitancy and urinary retention), or both. Proper urinary tract function is controlled by a complex network of peripheral and central nervous system. A delicate and complex switch exists between storage of urine and elimination of urine and in humans, the control over this switch is located in brain stem. Although significant research efforts have been utilized to understand supraspinal neural control of LUTs in humans, our understanding of the brainstem in humans is very limited, mainly due to the small size of nuclei. The extensive involvement of the brainstem in LUTS control has urged us to look into a better way to investigate and identify the brainstem nuclei involved throughout the entire bladder cycle, especially in neurogenic patients. To our knowledge, there has been no published study using high-resolution MRI (7 Tesla) to study the role of brainstem specifically in LUT. Brainstem evaluation in regards to LUT function in a thorough and accurate manner using high-resolution techniques is of high priority for benign urology and National Institute of Health. The findings from this proposal will lay the foundation to study of brainstem control in the bladder cycle in neurogenic patients with high-resolution neuroimaging, and will be seminal research in the field. The investigators hypothesize that Grey matter (blood-oxygen-level-dependent BOLD) signals and functional connectivity (FC) evaluation of the brainstem regions involved in continence and micturition are superior in 7T when compared to 3T in humans allowing assessment of the variations between men and women. Brainstem Regions of Interest (ROIs) include Pontine Storage Center (PSC) ("L region of the pons) and PAG are expected to be activated during the storage (continence) phase and Pontine Micturition Center (PMC) ("M" region of the pons) are expected to be activated during the voiding (micturition) phase.

NCT ID: NCT04845646 Recruiting - Healthy Clinical Trials

DDI Study of ASC41 Tablets in HV and the PK, Safety and Tolerability in Subjects With NAFLD.

Start date: March 16, 2021
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of itraconazole, a strong inhibitor), and phenytoin a strong inducer of cytochrome P450 3A on the pharmacokinetics of ASC41, a THR beta agonist tables in healthy subjects. The PK, Safety and Tolerability of ASC 41 in Subjects with NAFLD will also be evaluated. Approximately 24 subjects including 16 HVs and 8 subjects with NAFLD will be enrolled. This study consists of 3 cohorts.

NCT ID: NCT04843449 Recruiting - Healthy Clinical Trials

Study to Evaluate the Effects of Itraconazole and Rifampin on the Pharmacokinetics of ASC40 in Healthy Subjects

Start date: April 4, 2021
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the effects of itraconazole (a strong inhibitor of cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A)) and rifampicin (a strong inducer of CYP3A) on the pharmacokinetics of ASC40 in healthy volunteers.

NCT ID: NCT04841772 Recruiting - Healthy Clinical Trials

Exploring Muscle Breakdown During Exercise Recovery

EMBER
Start date: April 1, 2021
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This study will allow us to explore how muscle responds to heavy exercise. We will characterise rates of muscle protein breakdown and synthesis 24hours after heavy exercise with a post exercise protein polyphenol or placebo supplementation. This will inform strategies to help people recover from heavy exercise.

NCT ID: NCT04840095 Recruiting - Healthy Clinical Trials

Dynamic Connectivity Under Metabolic Constraints

Start date: June 19, 2015
Phase: Phase 4
Study type: Interventional

In this study, we investigate the impact of insulin resistance on the acceleration of brain aging, and test whether increased neuron insulin resistance can be counteracted by utilization of alternate metabolic pathways (e.g., ketones rather than glucose). This study has three Arms, which together provide synergistic data. For all three Arms, subjects are tested in a within-subjects design that consists of 2-3 testing sessions, 1-14 days apart, and counter-balanced for order. During each session we measure the impact of fuel (glucose in one session, ketones in the other) on brain metabolism and associated functioning. For Arms 1-2, our primary experimental measure is functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), which we will use to trace the self-organization of functional networks following changes in energy supply and demand. Arm 1 tests the impact of endogenous ketones produced by switching to a low carbohydrate diet, while Arm 2 tests the impact of exogenous ketones consumed as a nutritional supplement. For Arm 3, we use simultaneous magnetic resonance spectroscopy/positron-emission tomography (MR/PET) to quantify the impact of exogenous ketones on production of glutamate and GABA, key neurotransmitters. Subjects will be given the option to participate in more than one of the Arms, but doing so is not expected nor required. Prior to scans, subjects will receive a clinician-administered History and Physical (H&P), which includes vital signs, an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), and the comprehensive metabolic blood panel. These will be used to assess diabetes, kidney disease, and electrolytes. If subjects pass screening, they will be provided the option to participate in one or more Arms, which include neuroimaging. To provide a quantitative measure of time-varying metabolic activity throughout the scan, based upon quantitative models of glucose and ketone regulation, as well as to be able to implement safety stopping rules (see below), we will obtain pin-prick blood samples three times: prior to the scan, following consumption of the glucose or ketone drink, and following completion of the scan. To assess effects of increased metabolic demand, we measure brain response to cognitive load, transitioning from resting-state to spatial reasoning through a Tetris task. To assess effects of increased metabolic supply, we measure brain response to glucose or ketone bolus.

NCT ID: NCT04835857 Recruiting - Healthy Clinical Trials

Comparison of Cuff-Less Wrist Wearable Blood Pressure Device to Cuff Based Blood Pressure Measuring Devices

Start date: January 1, 2021
Phase:
Study type: Observational

(1) To compare cuff-less wrist wearable radial artery blood pressure measurements utilizing ViTrack(developed by Dynocardia) to the cuff based commercially available blood pressure device, in healthy volunteers with normal or high blood pressure.

NCT ID: NCT04832165 Recruiting - Healthy Clinical Trials

Inspiratory Muscle Training on Diaphragm Thickness, Inspiratory Muscle Pressure and Physical Function

Start date: April 4, 2021
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Fatigue of the respiratory muscles is one of the limitations of exercise at high intensity, although the mechanisms that explain it are not yet clear. This fatigue would cause a decrease in physical performance and could limit the functional capacity of the subject. In this sense, it has been shown that specific training of respiratory muscles, especially inspiratory muscles, improves their strength and resistance both in healthy people and in people with pathologies; managing to improve the quality of life and both physical and sports performance. This study, which follows the quantitative method and proposes an analytical, experimental, longitudinal and prospective design (with the aim of conducting a randomized clinical trial), proposes an intervention based on performing a specific training of inspiratory muscles for 8 weeks, taking 30 maximum inspirations at 60% of the PIM (maximum inspiratory pressure), 2 times a day for 5 days a week; with the aim of assessing the effects on inspiratory function, cardiorespiratory fitness when performing a stress test (Harvard step test) and diaphragm thickness measured by ultrasound. 40 healthy subjects between 18 and 25 years old will be recruited and divided into two groups: an experimental group (n = 20) and a control group (n = 20).

NCT ID: NCT04827472 Recruiting - Healthy Clinical Trials

Study to Evaluate the Safety/Tolerability, Pharmacokinetics, and Pharmacodynamics After Intravenous DWJ1521 Administration in Healthy Adult Volunteers

Start date: January 20, 2021
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

The safety/tolerability and pharmacokinetic properties of DWJ1521 are evaluated after single intravenous administration of DWJ1521 in healthy adults. The safety/tolerability and pharmacokinetic properties of DWJ1521 single intravenous administration and DWP14012 single oral administration in healthy adults are compared.