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NCT ID: NCT05012670 Active, not recruiting - Healthy Clinical Trials

Mass Balance Recovery, Metabolite Profile, and Metabolite Identification of [14C]-Paxalisib in Healthy Male Subjects

Start date: August 18, 2021
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

Single-centre, open-label, non-randomised study to assess the mass balance recovery, PK, metabolite profile, and metabolite identification of a single oral dose of 14C labelled paxalisib ([14C] Paxalisib) in healthy male subjects.

NCT ID: NCT05009420 Active, not recruiting - Healthy Clinical Trials

Validation of Avocatin b as a Biomarker of Food Intake

AVOC5
Start date: July 19, 2021
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The primary objectives are to - Identify avocatin b (C17 lipid) in plasma of individuals that consumed 1 avocado. - Confirm no avocation b present in the plasma of individuals that avoided avocado intake for 7 days. - Determine the effect of an overnight fast on avocation b detection.

NCT ID: NCT04985006 Active, not recruiting - Healthy Clinical Trials

Effect of Exercise Intensity on Epigenetic Response in Healthy Young Adult

Start date: October 1, 2020
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Aerobic exercise has been shown to trigger a variety of body responses which then trigger physiological adaptations. One of the physiological adaptations that occur is an increase in mitochondrial biogenesis. Mitochondria are organelles in cells that play a role in providing energy. An increase in the number of mitochondria will increase the supply of energy for muscle cell contraction, so that muscles do not get tired easily (Oliveira & Hood, 2019). Mitochondrial biogenesis is known to be regulated by Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator-1 alpha (PGC-1α), by inducing transcription of genes encoded by the nucleus and mitochondria (Islam et al., 2018). Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator-1 alpha is a protein which encoded by the PPARGC1A gene. PPARGC1A gene expression itself can be influenced by microRNA, a short non-coding RNA that can regulate gene expression by suppressing or degrading the target gene (Domańska-Senderowska et al., 2019). In vitro studies show that PPARGC1A gene is a direct gene target of miR-23a (Sun LY et al., 2014). In human studies, aerobic exercise has been shown to reduce miR-23a levels in human muscles immediately after exercise (Ringholm et al.2011). Another study found an increase in muscle PGC-1 alpha levels after exercise (Henriette Pilegaard et al., 2003). In addition to being detectable in muscle, both miR-23a and PGC-1 alpha can be measured in blood plasma. However, whether exercise can reduce miR-23a levels while increasing PGC-1 alpha levels, still needs further research. Therefore, this study aims to examine whether aerobic exercise will reduce miR-23a levels and PGC-1 alpha levels. In addition, this study will also compare whether exercise intensity affects the expression of miR-23a and PGC-1 alpha. In this study, measurements will be made on blood plasma to reduce the level of invasiveness. Subjects will be asked to come to the laboratory three times. The first meeting consisted of an examination, while in the second and third meetings the subjects would be asked to run at a moderate or high intensity. Blood sampling will be done before and after exercise.

NCT ID: NCT04979351 Active, not recruiting - Healthy Clinical Trials

The Effect of Post Colonoscopy Abdominal Massage on Abdominal Pain, Distension, Discomfort and Patient Satisfaction

Start date: November 9, 2020
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Background: Abdominal pain, distension, and discomfort are the most frequently seen side effects after colonoscopy. These side effects can cause physical and mental results and increased workloads and care costs. Additionally, the satisfaction of the patients with the colonoscopy process may affect their willingness to undergo repeated colonoscopies in the future which may be required for the surveillance of colon malignity. Currently, there are no studies evaluating the effects of abdominal massage on post colonoscopy these abdominal symptoms. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of post colonoscopy abdominal massage on abdominal pain, distension, discomfort, and patient satisfaction. Methods: This study was designed as a prospective randomized controlled study. Participants meeting inclusion criteria will be assigned to intervention and control groups using a random number generator. Participants assigned to the intervention group will receive abdominal massages twice a day after colonoscopy, and participants assigned to the control group will receive only "routine care". The abdominal pain, distension, discomfort, and satisfaction levels of the patients will be evaluated using the Visual Analogue Scale. Conclusions: New approaches are needed to improve the physiological and psychological health levels of patients after colonoscopy and help them return to their daily life activities and social lives faster. The trial will provide valuable evidence to inform clinical application and help evaluate the effects of the use of the relevant intervention.

NCT ID: NCT04965337 Active, not recruiting - Healthy Clinical Trials

Study to Evaluate Safety, Tolerability and Pharmacokinetics of ASC42 in Chinese Healthy Subjects

Start date: July 11, 2021
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This is a Phase I Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Dose Escalation, Single Center Bridging Study to Evaluate Safety, Tolerability and Pharmacokinetics of ASC42 in Chinese Healthy Subjects.

NCT ID: NCT04946903 Active, not recruiting - Healthy Clinical Trials

A Study to Evaluate the Pharmacokinetics and Safety Between HCP1902 and Co-administration of RLD2007, RLD2008

Start date: June 10, 2021
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the pharmacokinetic characteristics and safety between HCP1902 and co-administration of RLD2007/RLD2008 in healthy volunteers

NCT ID: NCT04916795 Active, not recruiting - Healthy Clinical Trials

A Study To Investigate The Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics, Safety And Tolerability Of Single Dose Vupanorsen In Healthy Chinese Adults

Start date: June 17, 2021
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This is a Phase 1, randomized, parallel-cohort, open-label study to characterize the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, safety and tolerability of vupanorsen following 80 mg and 160 mg single subcutaneous dose in healthy Chinese adults with elevated fasting triglyceride.

NCT ID: NCT04899674 Active, not recruiting - Healthy Clinical Trials

A Study in Healthy Men and Women to Test Whether BI 1358894 Influences the Amount of Bupropion in the Blood

Start date: June 30, 2021
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

The main objective of this trial is to investigate the relative bioavailability of a single dose of bupropion when given alone (Reference) compared with co-administration (Test) with BI 1358894 in healthy volunteers.

NCT ID: NCT04894305 Active, not recruiting - Healthy Clinical Trials

A Study of Ad26.COV2.S in Healthy Adults (COVID-19)

Start date: May 21, 2021
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of this study is to assess the safety and reactogenicity of Ad26.COV2.S (0.3 milliliter [mL] versus 0.5 mL) and to demonstrate non-inferiority (NI) of Ad26.COV2.S (0.3 mL versus 0.5 mL), 28 days after vaccination.

NCT ID: NCT04867655 Active, not recruiting - Healthy Clinical Trials

Acute Effect of Orange Juice Mixed With Oat β-Glucan on Bioavailability of Polyphenols in Healthy Individuals

Start date: July 10, 2019
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Brief summary Orange juice is the most widely consumed fruit juice, accounting for around a third of the total fruit juice market and is a rich source of vitamin C and bioactive compounds, predominantly flavonoids. Current research into the health effects of fruit juice consumption has presented some conflicting conclusions. Although potential health benefits have been attributed to the anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties of the bioactive components in juice, other studies have suggested that the benefits of consuming orange are outweighed by the negative implications of the high sugar content leading to increases in blood glucose and insulin. At the same time it is well established that supplementation with a mean dose of 5g of β-Glucan, a soluble fibre derived from cereals such as oats or barley, significantly reduces insulin and glucose in healthy subjects and metabolic compromised individuals. Thus, the formulation of an OJ beverage with an added β-Glucan supplement may be a useful strategy to attenuate the detrimental impact of high sugar content. However, while delaying the absorption of glucose brings about favourable effects on post-prandial glycemia, dietary fibre may also reduce the bioavailability of some beneficial compounds, including polyphenols. So far, it remains unclear how addition of β-Glucan impacts bioavailability of orange juice flavanones. Thus, this study aims to determine how the bioavailability of orange juice polyphenols of healthy adults is affected mixing orange juice with 3 g and 6 g of oat β-Glucan.