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Depressive Symptoms clinical trials

View clinical trials related to Depressive Symptoms.

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NCT ID: NCT03699488 Completed - Anxiety Disorders Clinical Trials

Messaging Therapy for Depression and Anxiety: 2 Longitudinal Effectiveness Studies

Start date: February 12, 2015
Phase:
Study type: Observational

Therapies delivered via technology have been developed to improve accessibility, however, there is limited research regarding messaging therapy in particular, and none that we know of utilizing a longitudinal effectiveness design. The aim of two studies was to investigate the overall effectiveness of messaging therapy, identify any contributors to its effectiveness, and to evaluate a dosage effect for this type of treatment.

NCT ID: NCT03659591 Not yet recruiting - Depressive Symptoms Clinical Trials

Triple Aim Psychotherapy: Aimed at Improving Patient Experience, Population Health, and Cost

TAP
Start date: September 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Community mental health programs in publically-funded jurisdictions such as Canada often have limited budgets in order to provide services, which can result in inadequate access to effective treatment for patients. Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) is a gold-standard psychotherapy for depression and anxiety. In order to improve access to treatment, community mental healthcare settings often provide CBT in a group format for patients experiencing mild-to-moderate symptoms. However, typical protocols for delivering group CBT in a community setting nonetheless require a considerable investment of limited clinician time. The Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) developed the Triple Aim, which is a framework describing an approach to optimizing health system performance by simultaneously pursuing three dimensions, namely improving the patient experience of care; improving the health of populations; and reducing the associated per capita costs of care. Adaptive Psychological Training (APT) is a group-based psychotherapy designed with all of the dimensions of the Triple Aim in mind simultaneously. In its development, APT drew heavily upon mindfulness-based approaches. To-date, APT has already demonstrated positive outcomes in pilot research and in community clinical settings. The purpose of the current study is to determine whether for a given population of patients experiencing mild-to-moderate symptoms of depression and/or anxiety, APT can facilitate meaningful change for more patients per time spent by clinicians than can CBT.

NCT ID: NCT03655730 Not yet recruiting - Depressive Symptoms Clinical Trials

Efficacity of Psychological Intervention on Reducing the Suicidal Ideations, Depression Level and Improving Reinsertion

MLADO
Start date: September 24, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Suicide is the third leading cause of death in adolescents and young adults in the United States and the second leading cause in European countries. Depressive disorders are consistently the most prevalent psychiatric disorder among adolescents who attempt suicide with a prevalence ranging from 49% to 64%. Depression in adolescent and young adults is a multifactorial phenomenon, as is the risk of suicidal attempt. To address such problems, effective and accessible treatment is needed, as recommended by the French Health Authority (HAS). Our primary objective is to demonstrate that a weekly psychotherapeutic intervention reduces the depression level. The primary assessment criterion is the variation of the clinician Adolescent Depression Rating Scale (ADRSc) from randomisation to month 6. The study also aims comparing in the 2 randomised groups - ADRS depression global score (clinician and subject) at 0, 3, 9 and 12 months - Number of suicidal attempts and self-harm attempts at 6 and 12 months - Number of drop-out at 6 and 12 months - Beck's Hopelessness Scale at 0, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months - Global score on the GHQ-28 and scores on the 4 subscales (Somatization, Anxiety and Insomnia, Social dysfunction, Depressive mood) at 0, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. - Working AIliance Inventory (WAI) score at 0, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months

NCT ID: NCT03655067 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

Internet-Based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Depressive Symptoms in Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

Start date: October 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This study evaluates the use of an established internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy intervention in a group of adolescents with type 1 diabetes and mild to moderate depressive symptoms. Half of the participants will receive the internet-based intervention while the other half will receive usual care.

NCT ID: NCT03653351 Recruiting - Anxiety Clinical Trials

Brain Stimulation and Enhancing Cognition in Older Adults

Start date: June 27, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The aim of the current research is to evaluate the efficacy of a combination of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to improve cognitive function in individuals with anxiety, depression and/or cognitive complaints.

NCT ID: NCT03652948 Recruiting - Depression Clinical Trials

Meru Health Ascend Mobile Intervention for Depression in Middle Aged and Older Adults

Start date: July 12, 2018
Phase: Phase 2/Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

Using technology to deliver depression interventions is one way could alleviate the public health burden of depression. The study is testing a mobile app intervention program for depression that uses cognitive behavioral skills and mindfulness. This study seeks to obtain feedback on the intervention and refine the intervention and then test the intervention in a larger study. The mobile app intervention called the Meru Health Ascend program consists of the app and therapist support via messaging within the app.

NCT ID: NCT03649958 Recruiting - Insomnia Clinical Trials

Neurotechnology Following Traumatic Brain Injury

Cereset
Start date: August 28, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This study seeks to improve symptoms such as pain and sleep problems after concussion, or mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) through a series of 10 office sessions in which musical tones are echoed, or mirrored back in real time, to reflect one's own brain activity. Those who take part in the study will be randomly assigned to receive either tones that are based on their brain activity/brainwaves, or random tones.

NCT ID: NCT03626142 Recruiting - Depressive Symptoms Clinical Trials

Assessing the Effectiveness of Psychiatric Interventions on the Inpatient Unit

Start date: July 9, 2018
Phase:
Study type: Observational

This study will monitor the symptoms of patients who have received an intervention on the psychiatric inpatient unit at Stanford hospital up to 6 months after they have received the intervention. Additionally, the acceptability and feasibility of interventions will be assessed using clinician and patient questionnaires.

NCT ID: NCT03620721 Not yet recruiting - Depressive Symptoms Clinical Trials

Effectiveness and Implementation of a Mindfulness Intervention for Depressive Symptoms Among Adults in a FQHC

M-Body
Start date: March 1, 2019
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The objective of this project is to examine the clinical effectiveness of a mindfulness intervention on reducing depressive symptoms among socio-economically disadvantaged, racial/ethnic minority adults and explore factors related to implementation in a Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC). This research will be used to develop a generalizable model for delivery of streamlined mental health interventions in community based settings that will be broadly disseminated and scalable to other populations. Black and Hispanic adults are more likely than those who are White to receive depression treatment in primary care, where antidepressants are the most commonly offered treatment. However, Black and Hispanic adults are less likely than Whites to find antidepressants acceptable. A mindfulness depression intervention provided within primary care may be more accessible and acceptable for low-income, racial/ethnic minority individuals, a severely underserved population. The investigators will conduct a randomized controlled trial to test the clinical effectiveness of a mindfulness intervention (M-Body) on reducing depressive symptoms, compared to usual care, among low-income racial/ethnic minority adults in a FQHC. The M-Body intervention is based on Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction and has been tailored for the FQHC setting and patient population. Adults (N=330) with depressive symptoms will be recruited from a FQHC in the Chicago, IL area that serves majority racial/ethnic minority individuals (90%) living at or below the poverty line (74%). Half of the patients will be randomized to the M-Body intervention arm where they will receive 8-weeks of mindfulness training led by FQHC staff and the other half will be randomized to usual care. Information on factors relevant to implementation of the intervention in the FQHC will be obtained by convening a series of workgroups and individual interviews with FQHC staff, executive leadership and community stakeholders. Specific Aims: 1) Determine the effectiveness of M-Body on reducing depressive symptoms compared to enhanced usual care for racial/ethnic minority adults in a FQHC; 2) Explore potential mediators (stress related biomarkers, mindfulness) and moderators (age, personal, social, environmental stressors) of the intervention's effect; 3) Conduct a broad assessment of organizational and individual agency factors related to preparation and implementation of the M-Body intervention in a FQHC using a mixed methods approach.

NCT ID: NCT03605524 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Depressive Disorder, Major

Olfactory Training and Emotional State

ENOLFEA
Start date: August 28, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

During the past three decades, researchers have paid particular attention to the study of olfactory disorders in depression. Recent studies have shown that depression is characterized by a change in olfactory and emotional perception resulting in a decrease of the perception of positive stimuli (odors and facial expressions) and an increase in perception of negative stimuli (odors). Moreover, it has also been shown in healthy subjects that the presence of minor depressive symptoms leads to a decreasing of olfactory sensitivity. However, odor discrimination was not impaired in these subjects. This observation suggest the presence of a change in "targeted" olfactory perception in people with depressive symptoms without reporting major depression. In addition, studies in subjects with olfactory disorders (following respiratory tract infections or following Parkinson's disease) have shown an improvement in olfactory function after daily training with odors during 12 weeks. From all these observations, the hypothesis is that an olfactory training could improve the overall olfactory functioning and the emotional perception of the subjects presenting minor depressive symptoms and of the depressed patients.