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Obesity clinical trials

View clinical trials related to Obesity.

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NCT ID: NCT03673111 Recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

Study of the Gut Hormone Analogue Y14 in Adult Subjects

Start date: May 10, 2017
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

A randomised, placebo controlled Phase I study to investigate investigate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of Y14 in adult subjects.

NCT ID: NCT03672903 Recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

Effect of Different Weight Vests on Body Weight in Obese Individuals

EVO
Start date: September 27, 2018
Phase: Phase 1/Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

Obesity related ailments, such as cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and metabolic disorders are major causes of death in the Western World. The proposed research may result in improved prevention, diagnosis and treatments of obesity and obesity-related disorders. Recently published data show that if a weight is carried by a rodent, this animal will lose body weight and gain an improved glucose control. We aim to confirm these findings in a human model. We plan to let obese subjects carry weight vests and monitor their change in body weight. We will also measure appetite, physical activity and insulin sensitivity to further examine the potential beneficial effects of loading. Blood sampling will be performed to investigate the mechanism of action.

NCT ID: NCT03672227 Enrolling by invitation - Childhood Obesity Clinical Trials

Obesity Prevention in Head Start

Start date: August 24, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Family style dining is a widely-advocated approach by which to feed children in early education settings. While family-style dining is hypothesized to allow children to attend to their hunger and satiety and consume only the amount of food they need to meet their energy needs, children's ability to self-regulate eating in this setting is dependent on a number of factors including early life experiences, the feeding strategies caregivers use during meals, and the eating environment. The goal of this study is to develop and implement a novel curriculum for childcare providers, Mealtime Matters, that addresses the factors that interfere with children's self-regulation of eating and offers caregivers strategies to reduce exposures that promote over-eating in the early education environment. Mealtime Matters will be pilot tested through a randomized controlled trial design with 7 Head Start classrooms, enrolling approximately 72 low-income preschool-aged children. Intervention feasibility and acceptability will be examined, as well as changes in caregiver/child mealtime interactions and children's dietary intake during meals at Head Start. Study results will inform the development of a fully-scaled efficacy trial.

NCT ID: NCT03671733 Recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

Effects of GLP-1 RAs on Weight and Metabolic Indicators in Obese Patients

Start date: September 1, 2018
Phase: Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

This studay evaluates the effect of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist,including Liraglutide,Exenatide and Exenatide Microspheres for Injection,in the treatment of subjects who are overweight or obese.

NCT ID: NCT03670875 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Obesity in Childhood

Non-Pharmacologic Alternatives for Childhood Obesity

Start date: January 8, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Childhood obesity is a global health issue. Mexico has been considered as the country with the higher number of children with obesity. There are not approved drugs to support diet and exercise as the first step to lose weight. Animal models and clinical trials in adults have provided evidence about safety and efficacy of interventions such as: prebiotics, curcumin, and omega- 3 fatty acids. The hypothesis of this study is: that non-pharmacological alternatives could support diet and exercise to decrease the weight of children with obesity.

NCT ID: NCT03669536 Active, not recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

Determinants of Cognitive Impairment Among Geriatrics

Start date: August 1, 2017
Phase:
Study type: Observational

This study aims to explore the determinants of cognitive impairment among Indonesian geriatrics in an Old Age Home.

NCT ID: NCT03667469 Recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

Study of the Life Expectancy of Patients With Metabolic Syndrome After Weight Loss:

LIFEXPE-RT
Start date: May 24, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Background and study aims: Surgical and non-surgical normalization of body weight with obesity leads to a significant improvement in health and regression of metabolic syndrome. But as the reduction in body weight with obesity changes the life expectancy remains not clear enough. The use of endoscopic staplers does not exclude the emergence of serious complications of surgery, for example, including bleeding and leakage in the stapler suture line. Therefore, the advantages of using a band in the bariatrics are justified from a security standpoint. Currently, the gastric bypass is increasingly performed in the version of the mini gastric bypass (MGB). Another name for the procedure: one anastomosis gastric bypass (OAGB). The proposal to use for the staple-free (stepleless or steplerless) creation of a pouch (band-separated gastric bypass) with use for band a vascular prosthesis is justified, but it requires comparison of this method with a stapler variant. An important issue is comparing surgical and non-surgical weight loss with obesity and metabolic syndrome and comparing life expectancy with confirmation of changes in telomere length. This study compares loss of weight, changes in other health conditions that the patient may have (co-morbidities, such as diabetes), telomere length, quality of life, the number of complications and side effects, the degree of complexity of the surgical technique and operating costs of a new laparoscopic band-separated mini- gastric bypass (LBSMGB) procedure compared with the standard stapler (linear cutter) - separated mini-gastric bypass (LSSMGB). Additionally, surgical treatment will be compared with non-surgical treatment (hypocaloric diet therapy). Who can participate? Obese adult patients with a BMI of between 30 kg/m2 and 50 kg/m2. What does the study involve? Participants are randomly allocated to one of three groups. Those in the first (A) group undergo the laparoscopic band-separated mini-gastric bypass procedure. Those in the second (B) group undergo the linear cutter stapler-separated mini-gastric bypass procedure. In three (C) group including standard lifestyle intervention on weight and hypocaloric diet therapy. All patients are then followed up one month after surgery and again after 6 and, finally, 12 months after surgery where the changing body mass index, changes in co-morbidities, change telomere length and quality of life are assessed.

NCT ID: NCT03666182 Recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

Genetics and Fat Taste Sensitivity

Start date: September 1, 2018
Phase:
Study type: Observational

A cross-sectional quantitative study will be carried out; recruiting female, Caucasian participants aged 18-65 years. The relevance of candidate gene studies is disputed. Research has shown associations between genotype and total fat intake. However, food preference is often described as a result of exposure to food types during upbringing. Many single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) have been associated with fat taste sensitivity, the majority of research shows that with a reduced sensitivity comes a higher total fat consumption. This study aims to assess the relationship between rs1761667 genotype, body mass index, fat intake, fat taste sensitivity and fat taste preference.

NCT ID: NCT03666169 Not yet recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

Receiving Genetic Information: A Quantitative Survey

Start date: September 11, 2018
Phase:
Study type: Observational

This study will evaluate the public's response to receiving genetic information via an electronic platform. It will comprise of an internet run quantitative survey.

NCT ID: NCT03666156 Recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

Adult Weight, Genetics and Lifestyle Factors

Start date: September 1, 2018
Phase:
Study type: Observational

Childhood obesity leads to adulthood obesity, demonstrated in many retrospective and longitudinal studies. Genetics as a predictor of obesity is less established. Morandi et al, (2012) assessed whether lifestyle and genetic factors can be used to predict childhood obesity, concluding that genetics had minimal predictive effect. More recently Seyednasrollah, (2017) demonstrated that genetic information, when alongside clinical factors for cardiovascular disease, increased the predictive accuracy of obesity risk in adults. This study aims to investigate if known lifestyle and genetic risk factors are associated with BMI and if they can be used as predictors of overweight/obesity in adults.