Clinical Trials Logo

Obesity clinical trials

View clinical trials related to Obesity.

Filter by:

NCT ID: NCT03527446 Not yet recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

Acute and Chronic Metabolic Flexibility in Individuals Living With Obesity: The i-FLEX Study

i-FLEX
Start date: May 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Regular exercise is a cornerstone in the prevention and the management of cardio-metabolic risk factors. Some of the beneficial effect of exercise training occurs through metabolic flexibility' enhancement. Metabolic flexibility is the ability to respond or adapt to conditional changes in metabolic demand, and previous literature has shown that individuals living with obesity have an impaired metabolic flexibility compared to lean individuals. However, there is a lack of empirical evidence on the impact of sprint interval training on metabolic flexibility and whether this translates into clinically meaningful outcomes. This study will evaluate the impact of 4-week sprint interval training in normal weight individuals as well as individuals living with obesity on acute and chronic metabolic flexibility, irisin secretion and insulin sensitivity.

NCT ID: NCT03527420 Not yet recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

DNA Methylation and Vascular Function

Start date: January 1, 2020
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The main objective is to examine DNA hypomethylation as an underlying mechanism for the increased production of inflammatory cytokines and the impaired vascular function in obese individuals and as a potential target for nonpharmacological preventive/therapeutic interventions such as aerobic exercise.

NCT ID: NCT03527394 Recruiting - Pediatric Obesity Clinical Trials

Motivation to Change Lifestyle Habits in Youth With Obesity

RMI-Family
Start date: November 6, 2017
Phase:
Study type: Observational

Approximately one-third of Canadian children have excess weight, putting them at increased risk of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, bone and joint problems, and some forms of cancer. Because current therapies for managing obesity have modest success, there is a need to develop and test innovative strategies to enhance pediatric weight management. Using a novel interview designed to measure motivation to change lifestyle habits, interviewers will conduct separate and structured 1-on-1 interviews with youth with obesity and parents. By applying principles of motivational interviewing, trained interviewers will ask youth and their parents about their motivation to change lifestyle habits related to diet and physical activity. Subsequently, interview data will be used to examine predictors of clinically-meaningful outcomes over time, including changes in weight status, lifestyle habits, health care utilization, and attrition. The investigators will also measure a number of variables related to weight management, including dietary intake, physical activity, anthropometry, and psychosocial health.

NCT ID: NCT03527368 Not yet recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

The Time-Restricted Intake of Meals Study

TRIM
Start date: May 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

TRIM is a randomized, controlled feeding study to evaluate if eating earlier in the day vs. later in the day impacts weight and glucose homeostasis.

NCT ID: NCT03526783 Completed - Obesity Clinical Trials

MGB/OAGB Versus RYGB After Failed Sleeve

Start date: October 2014
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Sleeve Gastrectomy is the most performed bariatric procedure worldwide. But a growing number of data documents that some patients have to be surgical revised due to weight regain or gastro-esophageal reflux disease. This study elaborates weather Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) or Mini/One anastomosis gastric bypass (MGB/OAGB) is a better second step procedure after failed sleeve gastrectomy.

NCT ID: NCT03526263 Not yet recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

Endoscopic Gastric Mucosal Devitalization (GMD) as a Primary Obesity Therapy

GMD
Start date: May 20, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Rapid metabolic improvements seen with sleeve gastrectomy are likely a result of changes in gastric origin. The gastric mucosa is an endocrine organ that regulates satiation pathways and is a complex regulator of food intake as well as lipid and glucose metabolism. This study aims to assess the efficacy and safety of endoscopic selective gastric mucosal devitalization (GMD) for the management of obesity and its related comorbidities.

NCT ID: NCT03526237 Completed - Obesity Clinical Trials

Novel Intervention Linking Public Housing With Primary Care to Prevent Diabetes

SHAPE-Up
Start date: April 24, 2015
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

(Sisters Health And Primary CarE Uniting and Preventing Diabetes; aka SHAPE UP) will consist of: 1) Neighborhood DPP Intervention: group DPP sessions and individual coaching; 2) Preventive Care Coordination to FQHC: referral, navigation assistance, patient activation, linkage to primary care (community initiated referrals) and linkage to DPP program (FQHC initiated referrals)

NCT ID: NCT03525002 Recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

Dopamine Action on Metabolism in Relation to Genotype

Start date: May 2018
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

Obesity is a widespread disease with increasing prevalence and associated with serious secondary complications. So far, the origin of the disease, regardless of an existing positive energy balance, is not fully understood. In addition to environmental factors, the genetic background plays an important role in the pathogenesis of obesity. Of common genetic polymorphisms, variants in the fat mass and obesity associated gene (FTO) locus have the highest effect size on body weight. Animal and first clinical studies indicate that FTO variants interact with dopamine signaling in the brain, thus influencing the risk of overweight. In fact, preliminary results indicate that enhancing dopamine signaling with the dopamine agonist bromocriptine, depending on the FTO genotype, either induces weight loss or has a neutral effect on body weight. The planned clinical trial serves to develop a genotype-specific and thus individualized therapy approach for obesity. The influence of dopamine agonist therapy on weight loss as a function of the FTO (rs8050136) genotype is to be tested. Here, the greatest weight loss is expected to occur in subjects carrying the homozygous risk-allele (AA). So far, there are only a few established conservative therapy forms of obesity, so that bariatric interventions with an increasing rate are necessary to achieve weight loss and thus a reduction in overall morbidity and mortality. Among the approved drug therapies for obesity, bromocriptine is commonly used. In addition, some interventions require injections. An early, conservative individualized, genotype-specific treatment with little side-effects would enable simple treatment of obesity. Study design: 150 obese (BMI > 30) subjects (50 / study center) will be enrolled in the study. The subjects will be stratified according to their FTO genotype (rs8050136). Subjects will be randomized into placebo or bromocriptine treatment group. Treatment will last for 18 weeks and a follow-up will be performed 30 weeks after baseline.

NCT ID: NCT03524469 Recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

Studying Infant Nutrition and Blood Sugar

Start date: June 1, 2018
Phase:
Study type: Observational

The purpose of this study is to learn about how breast milk from mothers with insulin-resistance may be different. Investigators are specifically studying insulin concentrations in breast milk. Investigators are also studying how insulin in breast milk might affect a baby's intestines and pancreas.

NCT ID: NCT03523403 Recruiting - Inflammation Clinical Trials

Obesity-related Health Benefits of Apples

Start date: October 12, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Obesity is characterized by an underlying inflammatory state in which various inflammatory signaling molecules, termed cytokines, affect metabolic processes central to type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease; leading causes of disability and death in Ontario. Such obesity-associated inflammation is partly due to the movement of endotoxin (i.e. lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a cell wall component of Gram-negative bacteria) from the gut microbiota to the blood, resulting in elevated blood levels of LPS (a condition termed metabolic endotoxemia) that stimulates inflammation. Digestion of a high-fat meal increases blood LPS and is subsequently associated with inflammation and metabolic impairments. However, in this context, little is known about how the consumption of bioactive-rich foods, such as whole apples, can improve impaired inflammatory and metabolic responses in overweight and obese individuals. Apples are a key commodity to study given that they are Ontario's predominant fruit crop with the apple industry valued at approximately $400 million, they require little food preparation, and they are common in the diet year-round. There are some, but limited, reports of potential apple-induced health benefits related to reductions in inflammation and improved metabolic responses in lean/healthy individuals, but work in overweight and obese individuals is especially lacking. Thus, to address the gap in our understanding of how daily apple intake may improve the health consequences of obesity, we will conduct a randomized clinical trial in which overweight and obese adults will consume three Ontario-grown Gala apples (approximately 300 g) as part of their typical diet in one sitting (i.e. acute consumption) and/or daily for six weeks (i.e. chronic consumption). The Acute Apple Consumption phase of the study will follow a randomized crossover design in which participants' rate of gastric emptying, efficacy of dietary lipid digestion and absorption, and production of inflammatory cytokines and biomarkers of metabolism will be assessed before and after consuming a high-fat meal (designed to provide 1 g fat/kg body weight) with or without three apples in one sitting. The Chronic Apple Consumption phase of the study will follow a randomized, controlled, parallel-arm design in which participants' (fasting) production of inflammatory cytokines and biomarkers of metabolism, as well as their gut microbiota profile, will be assessed before and after consuming three apples (or no apples) daily for six weeks. We hypothesize that the consumption of three whole apples in one sitting and daily for six weeks will improve these parameters in overweight and obese individuals at risk of developing chronic metabolic diseases.