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Obesity clinical trials

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NCT ID: NCT03369496 Active, not recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

The Montreal Neighbourhood Networks and Healthy Aging Panel

MoNNET-HA
Start date: July 1, 2007
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

Social networks, social capital, i.e., network-accessed resources, and neighbourhood environments have been shown associated with a range of health behaviours and conditions, including obesity, physical activity, nutrition, and mental health. Research on social capital and health in Montreal has shown the importance of network social capital for a person's subjective health status, sense of control, self-reported physical activity, and obesity. Research has also shown high social capital to reduce health service use, mental health service use, and improve the management of chronic illnesses. Despite advances in the understanding of social capital and its link to health and health service use, most research on social capital is cross sectional and is unable to identify the causal pathways linking social networks and capital to health and health care use. Longitudinal research would strengthen the evidence base for designing interventions to prevent or delay the use of health services, particularly in older adults. This research has three main objectives: (1) transform the original sample of Montreal Neighbourhood Networks and Healthy Aging (MoNNET-HA) households (n=2707) into a panel study, (2) link the MoNNET-HA participant data to their Quebec Health Insurance Registry (Régie de l'assurance maladie (RAMQ)) information, and (3) assess the feasibility of extending the MoNNET-HA panel by one wave to include participant's core network members. Unique about the original MoNNET-HA sample is that it purposefully oversampled older adults (> 64 years old) but remains representative of Montreal adults at various ages and income levels. In addition, MoNNET-HA data is integrated into a GIS database which allows researchers to examine the effects of neighbourhood environmental characteristics on health. By linking MoNNET-HA data to RAMQ, researchers will be able to examine patterns of diagnosed health conditions, (e.g., fractures, depression), pharmaceutical use and adherence, and formal health care use over time. Transforming the cross-sectional study into a panel study would also allow researchers to examine longitudinally the dynamics of health and health care utilization among Panel participants over the life course, and the causal pathways linking neighbourhoods and networks to health and health care use.

NCT ID: NCT03369145 Recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

High-fat Overfeeding, Hepatokines and Appetite Regulation

OVEREAT
Start date: December 11, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The present study will investigate the effect of high-fat overfeeding on a group of liver-secreted proteins linked to worsened blood sugar control, as well as proteins involved in appetite control. Participants will consume both a high-fat diet, consisting of 50% extra calories above their daily required intake, and a control diet, consisting of their normal 'habitual' diet, with each diet lasting seven days. The diets will be undertaken in a randomised order, with a period of three weeks separating the two diets. Blood samples will be taken before and after each diet to measure blood sugar control. Further blood samples will also be taken 24 hours and 72 hours into each diet to see how levels of the liver and appetite-regulating proteins change over the course of the seven days. It is expected that blood sugar control will be worsened by the high-fat diet and this will be accompanied by increases in levels of the liver-secreted proteins and an impaired release of the appetite-regulating proteins into the blood.

NCT ID: NCT03368716 Not yet recruiting - Pediatric Obesity Clinical Trials

Acceptance-based Care for Child Eating and Physical Activity Treatment

ACCEPT
Start date: December 18, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The overarching aims of this project are to develop and pilot test a novel, patient-centered, family model for weight management [Acceptance-based Behavioral Treatment (ABBT)] in children aged 8-12 with obesity and their caregivers. Our aims are (1) to determine the treatment needs of children aged 8-12 with obesity and their families with a focus on executive functioning and (2) to evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of family ABBT.

NCT ID: NCT03365531 Not yet recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

RCT of Caloric Restriction vs. Alternate-Day Fasting in Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

Start date: December 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in patients with diabetes (T2DM) is increasing in prevalence and can lead to cirrhosis. Lifestyle intervention with caloric restriction (CR) is the cornerstone of treatment but remission is variable. Alternatively, the PI has shown alternate day fasting (ADF) is safe and well tolerated in obese patients and there might be additional beneficial effects. The objective is to combine the expertise of the PI with this novel intervention and the expertise of Dr. Cusi in NAFLD to explore the effects of ADF vs CR in patients with NAFLD and T2DM to test the following hypotheses: H1: In patients with NAFLD and T2DM, the ADF intervention will result in more favorable metabolic changes than CR: H1a: Hepatic triglyceride by MRS will decrease more with ADF than CR (Primary Outcome) and remain lower following a period of free living H1b: There will be greater improvements in glucose homeostasis following ADF vs CR H1c: There will be greater improvement in lipid metabolism following ADF vs CR and changes in ketone metabolism will predict changes in hepatic triglyceride content H2: ADF will have similar safety and tolerability and result in a similar degree of weight loss in participants with NAFLD and DM compared to CR

NCT ID: NCT03364413 Recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

Brain's Response to Chocolate

Start date: January 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

The purpose of this study is to test how the brain responds when individuals eat enjoyable foods such as chocolate. Eating certain foods can make one want to keep eating even when feeling full, caused by dopamine in the brain. The researchers believe this dopamine response can be measured by looking at the individual's eye.

NCT ID: NCT03364335 Not yet recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

The Effect Of NS-0200 and NS-0300 Versus Placebo on Weight In Obesity

Start date: January 2018
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This is a 24-week study to evaluate the effects of two fixed-dose combinations of leucine and sildenafil or two fixed-dose combinations of leucine, sildenafil and metformin compared to placebo. The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the percentage change in body weight in subjects from Baseline/Visit 2 (Day 1) to Study Termination/Visit 8 (Day 168/Week 24).

NCT ID: NCT03364205 Completed - Obesity Clinical Trials

Solution Focused Approach in Adolescents (SFA)

SFA
Start date: September 2, 2013
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Aims-objectives: This study assessed the effect of the Solution Focused Approach (SFA) interview technique on overweight/obese adolescents' nutrition-exercise attitudes and behaviors. Background: Obesity is a serious health problem for all age groups, particularly adolescents; therefore, it is important for adolescents to develop healthy nutrition habits, acquire exercise behaviors. Unless healthy nutrition-exercise behaviors are acquired, obesity can develop in adolescence, continue in adulthood. Focusing on solutions can be effective for overweight/obese adolescents to develop healthy nutrition-exercise behaviors. Design: A pretest-posttest randomized-controlled trial design was used. Methods: The study included 32 overweight/obese adolescents (16 for intervention group, 16 for control group) aged12-13 years who attended a health center, met the inclusion criteria. The SFA interview technique was applied to the intervention group. Eight solution-focused interviews were conducted with each adolescent at two-week intervals (interview length 30 to 45minutes). For each group, anthropometric, metabolic measurement follow-ups were conducted in the first and sixth months. The data were evaluated using independent samples t-test, Mann-Whitney U, Wilcoxon test respectively for normally, non-normally distributed variables. The categorical variables were compared using chi-square test. The value p<0.05 was accepted to be statistically significant.

NCT ID: NCT03363581 Not yet recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

Food Preference Following Bariatric Surgery

Start date: December 15, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) decreases appetite, caloric intake, glycemia, and body weight, all of which are maintained long term.It is controversial whether, after RYGB, patients choose to eat less high fat and sugary foods in favor of lower energy dense alternatives. Therefore the proposition to use direct measures in humans after RYGB to test the hypothesis that the selection and intake of foods varying in fat content and glycemic index, as well as the pattern of ingestion within and across meals, changes in a manner that leads to beneficial outcomes on body weight.

NCT ID: NCT03363542 Recruiting - Visceral Obesity Clinical Trials

The Effects of Increased Fiber Diet Consumption on Outcomes of Subjects With Visceral Obesity

Start date: October 1, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The investigators propose to undertake a controlled dietary intervention study in UAE subjects with visceral obesity to examine the feasibility of a diet rich in fruits, vegetables and/or whole-grain fiber in the UAE population. The research will also investigate the longer-term influence of increased fruits, vegetables and fiber consumption on health and its capacity to sustain lifestyle change.

NCT ID: NCT03361644 Not yet recruiting - Weight Loss Clinical Trials

The Role of High Intensity Interval Training in the Treatment of Adolescent Obesity

Start date: December 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The study will compare the effects of High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) with Moderate Intensity Continuous Training (CMIT) as part of a lifestyle intervention program on BMI change in adolescents age 12-16 with obesity.