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Overweight and Obesity clinical trials

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NCT ID: NCT03192254 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Overweight and Obesity

Understanding Mechanisms of Health Behavior Change

Start date: June 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This research seeks to examine psychological factors that may impact relationship between incentives and health behavior engagement, specifically fruit and vegetable consumption. Additionally, it will compare the impact of two different incentive schedules on behavior engagement, one providing immediate rewards (i.e. rewards received on a daily basis) and another providing delayed rewards (i.e. rewards received at the end of the study period), with a control condition in which no rewards are offered. Study participants will provide reports of their fruit and vegetable consumption each day for three weeks, and in the two incentive conditions, they will receive small monetary rewards for their fruit and vegetable consumption. Following the three week reporting and reward period, participants will complete two additional assessments, measuring psychological constructs and behavior engagement following the cessation of rewards. The study will also examine how cognitive and anthropomorphic factors may contribute to intervention response and the effects on psychological constructs.

NCT ID: NCT03191591 Enrolling by invitation - Physical Activity Clinical Trials

The First 1,000 Days Program: Maternal-Child Obesity Prevention in Early Life

Start date: August 9, 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The First 1000 Days (conception to age 2) is a crucial period for the development and prevention of obesity and its adverse consequences in mother-child pairs and their families. The overall aim of the First 1000 Days program is to work across early-life systems to prevent obesity, promote healthy routines and behaviors, address social determinants of health, and reduce health disparities among vulnerable children and families at the MGH Chelsea and Revere HealthCare Centers, and DotHouse Health. The study aims to simultaneously implement and evaluate an obesity prevention program across early life systems to reduce the prevalence of obesity risk factors within racial/ethnic minority families, close the gap in maternal-child health disparities, and assess and address social determinants of health.

NCT ID: NCT03191331 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Gestational Diabetes

Dietary Intervention, Gestational Weight Gain and Gestational Diabetes.

Start date: June 6, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The aim of this pilot study is to conduct a dietary intervention for overweight (body maas index BMI≥25) and obese (BMI≥30) pregnant women in two maternity care clinics and explore the effect of the intervention on gestational weight gain and the prevalence of gestational diabetes between the intervention and control groups.

NCT ID: NCT03190135 Completed - Physical Activity Clinical Trials

Evaluation of the BOKS Before-school Physical Activity Program

Start date: September 1, 2015
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

BOKS, Build Our Kids' Success, is a before-school physical activity program that has been implemented in over 2,000 elementary and middle schools. Students participate in the program for 12 weeks, two or three mornings per week for about 1 hour per session. This study if a non-randomized control trial seeking to 1) examine the extent to which participation in the before-school BOKS program improves, health, well-being, and performance, and 2) compare the results of a two-day-per-week versus a three-day-per-week program.

NCT ID: NCT03186196 Completed - Clinical trials for Overweight and Obesity

Polymorphism C677T MTHFR and Folate Intake in Inflammatory Biomarkers

Start date: August 1, 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The C677T polymorphism of the MTHFR gene is associated to several biochemicals imbalances, as changes in folic acid serum levels and some inflammatory markers, elevating the oxidative stress and increasing the risk of developing non communicable diseases (NCDs). Thus, a diet containing folate as a main antioxidant nutrient, could reduce not only the oxidative stress, but also has many others benefits for individuals with this genetic alteration, like the anti-inflammatory function, which could help restore the altered serum levels and minimizing or avoiding the development of future diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the C677T polymorphism of the MTHFR gene and the effect of a diet containing folate in the inflammatory markers levels, such as homocysteine, Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukins in women with overweight or obesity. This is an intervention study, double-blind, held in a city in northeastern Brazil, with a sample of 48 adult women (20-59 years old) with BMI among 26.19 kg / m² and 49.64 kg / m². In which we evaluated the TNF-α levels, Interleukins 1β, Interleukin 6, Interleukin 8, Interleukin 12p70, Interleukin 10, homocysteine, folic acid and in addition to these markers evaluation, were made the genotyping for the C677T polymorphism in the MTHFR gene and the food consumption assessment by the 24 hour dietary recall (24HR). For the intervention, the sample was divided by randomization into two groups, each one with 24 indivuals, receiving daily during 8 weeks, a salad with 300g vegetables containing 191 ug of folate for group 1 and 90 ug for group 2.

NCT ID: NCT03182985 Recruiting - Metabolic Syndrome Clinical Trials

The Impact of Time Restricted Feeding (TRF) in Improving the Health of Patients With Metabolic Syndrome

Start date: June 22, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The investigators intend to measure the health impact of a dietary intervention known as time restricted feeding (TRF) on patients with body mass index ≥ 28 and metabolic syndrome (three or more of: increased waist circumference, abnormal cholesterol levels, elevated blood pressure, or elevated blood sugar). The investigators will enroll patients with metabolic syndrome who eat for ≥ 14 hours per day and will ask participants to reduce daily oral intake to 10 hours per day. The investigators will assess the impact of this dietary change using measures obtained before and after a 12 week intervention period, including body mass index, blood pressure, various lab parameters and blood sugar levels (assessed using a continuous glucose monitor). The investigators will assess for compliance with TRF using a Smart Phone application (myCircadianClock (mCC) app).

NCT ID: NCT03180580 Completed - Clinical trials for Overweight and Obesity

School Based Childhood Obesity Feasibility Study

Start date: July 2015
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

In Bangladesh, the prevalence of overweight and obesity among children varies from less than 1% to 17.9% based on different reference standard. In 2014 school based country wide study has been demonstrated that among children (6-15 years of age), 9.6% were overweight and 3.5% children were obese. Childhood obesity is getting increasing attention due to its association with adult obesity and increased risk of co morbidities in adulthood. Childhood obesity is known to be an independent risk factor for adult obesity and once a child is obese, it is difficult to reverse through interventions. This suggests an urgent need to address overweight and obesity levels in childhood. The increasing trend of childhood obesity suggests urgent solution of the problem. There is no evidence of intervention for childhood overweight and obesity exists in Bangladesh. This feasibility study will be able to generate evidence for overcoming this upcoming epidemic in resource poor setting. If the proposed study will be able to address its objective that will create a possibility for developing a large cluster randomized trial in low resource setting like Bangladesh. This study will also give opportunity to our policy makers for advocating to the government of Bangladesh for adopting an obesity control policy for children. The aim of the study is to develop a school based healthy eating and active lifestyles module and assess feasibility and acceptability of the guideline in school setting. Outcome measures/variables: Healthy Eating and Active Living intervention material (Guideline, Tiffin box) Perception of children, parents and policy makers regarding obesogenic behavior Acceptance of children, parents and policy makers regarding planned intervention. Facilitators and barriers of Healthy Eating and Active Living.

NCT ID: NCT03180008 Active, not recruiting - Osteoarthritis Clinical Trials

Fit and Strong! Plus Comparative Effectiveness Trial

Start date: December 2012
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This randomized controlled trial is comparing outcomes of customary Fit and Strong!, to Fit and Strong! Plus, an enhanced version of the program that incorporates weight management. We hypothesize that Fit and Strong! Plus participants will show improved diet behaviors at 2, 6, 12, and 18 months that will be accompanied by a significant 5% weight loss at 6 months and maintained to 18 months, compared to participants in customary Fit and Strong!.

NCT ID: NCT03175081 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Overweight and Obesity

Intraperitoneal Local Anesthetic in Bariatric Surgery Study (iLABS Study)

Start date: April 27, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Obesity is a metabolic disorder that has gradually become a prevalent public health problem and is becoming one of the leading causes of death and disability worldwide. The most efficacious therapy for morbid obesity today is bariatric surgery. Bariatric surgery increases life expectancy by correcting the comorbidities associated with obesity, improves the quality of life, and is associated with reduced morbidity and mortality. There is an increase application of laparoscopic procedures as it is considered to cause less pain than traditional open surgery, smaller incision, reduced blood loss and shorter postoperative stay, which cuts down on hospital cost. However, postoperative pain still exists causing unpleasant experience for the patient and at times causes a delayed discharge. Pain after bariatric surgery is a result of many mechanisms such as tissue injury, abdominal distention, local trauma of the stomach, chemical irritation of the peritoneum, and the pneumoperitoneum and this pain potentially can prolong hospital stay and lead to increased morbidity, and bariatric surgeons are striving to minimize the morbidity of current procedures to improve patient outcomes and this gave rise to the use of intraperitoneal local anesthetics (LA). It was found that the use of intraperitoneal LA in laparoscopic cholecystectomy is safe, and it results in a statistically significant reduction in early postoperative abdominal pain. Many studies were done to evaluate the efficacy of intraperitoneal LA in laparoscopic cholecystectomy, gynecologic procedures and appendectomy but to date there are limited studies done to evaluate the role of intraperitoneal LA in bariatric surgery. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of intraperitoneal instillation of local ropivacaine on postoperative abdominal pain after bariatric surgery. We hypothesized that the administration of intraperitoneal instillation of local ropivacaine would help reduce postoperative pain.

NCT ID: NCT03173755 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Overweight and Obesity

Pain Discomfort Enjoyment Levels During Moderate Exercise

Start date: June 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

In order to better understand how pre-existing pain and also discomfort/enjoyment during exercise may influence physical activity and be related to body weight the investigators are seeking to examine these as they relate to overweight/obesity compared to normal weight individuals. Ultimately, the investigators think that people with obesity may have more and be more sensitive to pain and have lower discomfort tolerance that may lead them to experience exercise more negatively. In the real world, this could result in them stopping exercise sooner or avoiding exercise all together. Therefore it is important for the investigators to begin to understand this issue better. In addition, some preliminary studies in animals suggest that the quality of the diet may influence pain sensitivity. This has yet to be examined in humans. As such the investigators will examine whether self-reported diet quality and also some markers in participants' blood that can tell the investigators about the recent quality of a person's diet, are related to the measures of pain, enjoyment and discomfort during exercise.