Search
 

Obesity Clinical Trials

Browse current & upcoming clinical research / studies on Obesity. There are a total of 2039 clinical trials for Obesity in 36 countries with 239 trials currently in the United States. 423 are either active and/or recruiting patients or have not yet been completed. Click the title of each study to get the complete details on eligibility, location & other facts about the study.

Other clinical trials

Definitions
Interventional trials
Determine whether experimental treatments or new ways of using known therapies are safe and effective under controlled environments.
Observational trials
Address health issues in large groups of people or populations in natural settings.
Recruiting
Participants are currently being recruited and enrolled.
Active, not recruiting
Study is ongoing (i.e., patients are being treated or examined), but enrollment has completed.
Not yet recruiting
Participants are not yet being recruited or enrolled.
Enrolling by invitation
Participants are being (or will be) selected from a predetermined population.
Completed
The study has concluded normally; participants are no longer being examined or treated (i.e., last patient's last visit has occurred).
Withdrawn
Study halted prematurely, prior to enrollment of first participant.
Suspended
Recruiting or enrolling participants has halted prematurely but potentially will resume.
Terminated
Recruiting or enrolling participants has halted prematurely and will not resume; participants are no longer being examined or treated.
Not yet recruiting

Obesity



Feel4Diabetes-study

January 2016 - August 2019
The aim of the Feel4Diabetes-study is to develop, implement and evaluate a community-based intervention aiming to create a more supportive social and physical environment to promote lifestyle and behaviour change to prevent type 2 diabetes among families from low and middle income countries and from vulnerable groups in high income countries in Europe.
Sponsor: Harokopio University
Study type: Interventional
January 2016 - November 2016
The purpose of this study is to find out if drinking extra water helps people lose or maintain weight loss and reduce hunger and, if so, what volume of water is most effective and when is it best to drink it.
Sponsor: ThinkWell
Study type: Interventional
October 2015 -
This pilot clinical trial studies a pancreatic nutritional program for helping patients with stage I-III breast cancer who are overweight or obese lose weight. When patients have a high level of sugar in their blood, due to eating sugary foods and/or a sedentary lifestyle, the pancreas needs to work harder to digest the sugar. This can cause weight gain, obesity, and other illnesses. Breast cancer patients who are overweight and obese are more likely to have their breast cancer return. The pancreatic nutritional program is a diet and lifestyle intervention that helps protect the pancreas by keeping blood sugar levels low, and may help patients achieve sustained weight loss, improved health, better quality of life, and possibly a better outcome to their treatment.
Sponsor: City of Hope Medical Center
Study type: Interventional
August 2015 - December 2016
The primary purpose of this study is to quantify activation of regions of the brain associated with taste, appetite, and reward after viewing high sugar and high fat (HS/HF) images compared to control images following ingestion of (1) an artificially sweetened solution, (2) a sucrose solution, and (3) a tasteless control solution in normal weight vs. obese women. This is a repeated measures study design; hence, data are collected on three days corresponding to the three solutions. Body mass index (BMI) is a between subjects measure. 1. After consuming an artificially sweetened solution and a sucrose solution compared to a tasteless solution, viewing HS/HF food images vs. control images will result in higher activation of taste pathways (frontal operulum and anterior insula (FO/AI)) in the brain. 2. After consumption of a sucrose solution compared to an artificially sweetened solution and a tasteless solution, viewing HS/HF food images vs. control images will result in higher activation of regions of the brain associate with appetite (hypothalamus). 3. After consumption of a sucrose solution compared to an artificially sweetened solution and a tasteless solution, viewing HS/HF food images vs. control images will result in higher activation of regions of the brain associated with reward [amygdala, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), Orbitalfrontal Cortex (OFC), and ventral tegmental area (VTA), striatum, insula] in obese but not normal weight women. After consuming an artificially sweetened solution compared to a tasteless solution, viewing HS/HF images vs. control images will result in no differences in activation of reward pathways of the brain.
Sponsor: Pennington Biomedical Research Center
Study type: Interventional
August 2015 - May 2021
Severe childhood obesity is associated with both immediate and chronic health problems and a severe impact on psychosocial development. Medical and behavioural interventions rarely result in the significant, durable weight loss necessary to improve health outcomes. This is a randomised clinical trial where 50 adolescents, 13-15 years of age, will be randomised to either early bariatric surgery (Roux-en-Y gastric bypass) or intensive conservative treatment and possibly surgery as they have become 18 year.
Sponsor: Göteborg University
Study type: Interventional
August 2015 - November 2016
Opioid sparing anesthesia is extremely important in the post-operative obese population. With more and more obese patients entering the operating room a multi-modal approach to analgesia is crucial. Finding effective alternatives to opioid therapy is the rationale of this proposal. Literature involving ketamine and magnesium in bariatric surgical patients is very sparse.
Sponsor: Milton S. Hershey Medical Center
Study type: Interventional
August 2015 - August 2021
Evaluation of the subchondral mineralization plate after excess weight loss in patientes undergoing bariatric operation by means of CT-osteoabsorptiometry.
Sponsor: Spital Limmattal Schlieren
Study type: Observational
August 2015 - February 2019
The study will examine the role of adipose tissue in vitamin D physiology, particularly its role as a depot. the study is randomized double blind and placebo controlled.
Sponsor: University of Tromso
Study type: Interventional
July 2015 - December 2020
Some individuals smoke with the perception that smoking helps control body weight. Smokers gain an average of as much as 10 pounds in the months following smoking abstinence, with heavier and more-dependent smokers gaining more weight. Mean weight gain may be as much as 13 pounds at one year and 21 pounds over 5 years. Actual weight gain following smoking abstinence has been commonly associated with smoking relapse. The use of a pharmacologic agent to address weight concerns and weight gain while the smoker focuses on the behavioral aspects of stopping smoking offers an attractive clinical option. The current research program involves the use of lorcaserin (an FDA-approved weight loss medication) to prevent post cessation weight gain in overweight or obese smokers who all receive varenicline. The Mayo Clinic Nicotine Research Program will randomize 60 nondiabetic, overweight or obese adult smokers to active lorcaserin or placebo for 24 weeks; all of the subjects will receive open-label varenicline for 12 weeks. The primary aim of this study is to assess the efficacy of a 24-week course of lorcaserin for decreasing weight gain after stopping smoking. Secondary aims will assess the efficacy of a 24-week course of lorcaserin for attenuating increases in waist circumference and BMI after stopping smoking. In addition, we will assess the efficacy of the combination of 24 weeks of lorcaserin and 12 weeks of varenicline on smoking abstinence rates.
Sponsor: Mayo Clinic
Study type: Interventional
July 2015 -
This goal of this randomized controlled effectiveness trial is to compare the effectiveness of a peer-led health lifestyle intervention (Peer GLB) versus usual care services in two supportive housing agencies in New York City (Pathways to Housing [PTH] and Federation Employment and Guidance Service [FEGS]) serving diverse clients with serious mental illness who are overweight or obese. The intervention follows the Group Lifestyle Balance curriculum derived from the Diabetes Prevention Program and that has been shown to help people achieve clinically significant weight loss (equal to or greater than 5% weight loss of initial weight). The intervention will be delivered by trained peer-specialists employed at the supportive housing agencies and supervised by the study team. Peer GLB is a 12-month group intervention that focuses helping people lose weight by improving people's diet and increasing their physical activity and consists of weekly core group sessions (3 mo.), bi-monthly transitional group sessions (3 mo.), and maintenance monthly sessions (6 mo.). We plan to enroll 300 clients with serious mental illness who are overweight/obese (BMI equal to or greater than 25) from our two supportive housing agencies. Clients will be randomized to either the Peer-led healthy lifestyle intervention or usual care conditions. The primary outcome for this study is achieving clinically significant weight loss (equal to or greater than 5% weight loss from baseline weight) at 12 and 18 months post randomization. The secondary outcomes for this study include overall reductions in weight, waist circumference, blood pressure, and improvements in physical activity, self-efficacy, recovery and health-related quality of life. Repeated assessments will be at baseline, 6, 12 and 18 month post randomization. Primary Hypothesis: Peer GLB participants will have a higher proportion of persons achieving clinically significant weight loss (equal to or greater than 5% weight loss) at 12 and 18 months than UC participants. Secondary Hypothesis: At 6, 12, and 18 months post-randomization, there will be significant reductions in average weight, waist circumference, blood pressure, and significant improvements in physical activity, self-efficacy, recovery, and health-related quality of life in Peer GLB compared to UC.
Sponsor: Columbia University
Study type: Interventional
Page  
Home  •  Browse by Condition  •  Search Clinical Trials
The information found on this site has been provided by clinicaltrials.gov in accordance with their terms & conditions. Neither we (inclinicaltrials.com), the United States Government, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health, National Library of Medicine, nor any of its agencies, contractors, subcontractors or employees of the United States Government make any warranties, expressed or implied, with respect to data found on this site, and, furthermore, assume no liability, or the results of such use, of any part of the data.