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Obesity clinical trials

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NCT ID: NCT03254576 Recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

Cue-Reward Learning and Weight Gain in Youth

Child Learn
Start date: December 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

The objective of the study is to compare children at low risk for obesity (two healthy weight parents) to children at high risk for obesity (two overweight parents) in their response rate to food taste and in their rate of learning using fMRI.

NCT ID: NCT03251833 Not yet recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

The Impact of Obesity on Maternal and Perinatal Outcomes

Start date: September 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

Body Mass Index is an index that is commonly used to classify underweight, overweight and obesity in adults. It is defined as the weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters.The growing epidemic of obesity in our society has become a major public health issue where the proportion of overweight and obese among women aged 15-59 have increased from 68 percent in 2008 to 76 percent in 2015

NCT ID: NCT03250702 Completed - Obesity Clinical Trials

DUCS-DHD Determinants of Hypertension in Tanzania

DUCS-HTN
Start date: March 2014
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

The aim of the Dar es Salaam Urban Cohort Hypertension Study (DUCS-HTN) was to determine the current prevalence, risk factors, and barriers to diagnosis and treatment for hypertension in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Few previous studies in Tanzania have analyzed the modifiable determinants of high BP as well as barriers to diagnosis and treatment of hypertension. DUCS-HTN is a cohort of adults living in the Ukonga ward of Dar es Salaam who had been registered in the Dar es Salaam Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS) in 2011. Due to the large size of Ukonga, the investigators chose to randomly sample two of the seven neighborhoods that compose Ukonga and then conducted a census of these two randomly selected neighborhoods, Mwembe Madafu and Markazi. The investigators attempted to contact all 4896 HDSS participants who were at least 40 years of age and lived in one of these neighborhoods. Trained interviewers conducted face-to-face interviews and physical examinations in participants' homes from March to June 2014. Follow-up visits were conducted from April to June 2015. Among 4896 potentially eligible participants from the HDSS baseline survey, 3604 (74%) were still living at the same address in 2014. Of these, 2290 (64%) enrolled in the DUCS-HTN study. Of the participants enrolled at baseline, 1752 (77%) participated in the follow-up study. Blood pressure measurements Trained interviewers measured blood pressure with digital blood pressure monitors (15 Omron M2 and 5 Beurer BM 40 monitors). Standard, large, and extra-large cuff sizes were used according to the size of a participant's arm. Blood pressure was measured three times with at least a 5-minute rest before the first measurement and 3-minute rests between each subsequent measurement. Blood pressure was taken on the left arm with the participant seated and the arm straight at heart level. Usual blood pressure values were calculated as the mean of the second and third readings. If a second visit was conducted, usual blood pressure values were defined as the mean of the second and third readings at both the first and second visits. Hypertension was defined as SBP≥140 mmHg or DBP≥90 mmHg, or self-reported use of anti-hypertensive medication. Grade I hypertension was defined as SBP of 140 to 159 or DBP of 90 to 99 mmHg; grade II hypertension was defined as SBP of 160 to 179 or DBP of 100 to 109 mmHg; and grade III hypertension was defined as SBP≥180 or DBP≥110 mmHg. Hypertension control was defined as current antihypertensive use and blood pressure of less than 140/90 mmHg. If a participant was found to have grade I or II hypertension, a second visit was scheduled, at least three days later. Those with grade III hypertension at the last reading of the first visit or grade I or II hypertension at the last reading of the second visit were told that they had high blood pressure, advised to see a health professional and were given a referral letter. In addition, a second visit and blood pressure reading was scheduled for a random sample of one-fifth of participants, who were selected for additional blood, urinary, and dietary measurements. Assessment of covariates All participants were administered a socio-demographic and lifestyle questionnaire and had their height, weight, and waist and hip circumference measured. Some demographic information (age, sex, neighborhood, religion, and assets used to create a household wealth index) was previously recorded during the HDSS baseline. Information on household health insurance coverage was collected in 2015 as part of routine HDSS updates. Standard protocols were used to take anthropometric measurements. Participants were weighed with minimal clothing using a digital scale (Seca, Germany) to the nearest 0.1kg and height was measured, with participants not wearing shoes, to the nearest 1cm. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated as the ratio of weight in kilograms to height in meters squared (kg/m2) and categorized according to WHO categories. The Global Physical Activity Questionnaire (GPAQ) was used to assess physical activity for work, transportation, and leisure. The investigators defined physical inactivity according to WHO guidelines. Number of servings of alcoholic beverages consumed was reported over the past 30 days. The investigators assumed 14 grams of alcohol as a standard drink portion size. A household wealth index was created through a principal component analysis of household characteristics and assets, and was categorized into quintiles. In the follow-up visit, participants were asked about their health over the past year and the reasons for not seeking hypertension care. A subsample of ~ one fifth of the participants completed a food frequency questionnaire, two 24-hour dietary recalls, a 24-hour urine collection for sodium, creatinine, protein, and potassium, and had capillary total cholesterol and blood glucose measurements taken.

NCT ID: NCT03249441 Active, not recruiting - Severe Obesity Clinical Trials

Compassion-Focused Therapy for People With Severe Obesity.

CFT
Start date: September 15, 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This study aims to explore the effectiveness of a group psychotherapy intervention using Compassion-Focused Therapy (CFT) in adults with severe obesity. In particular, it aims to evaluate the principle that CFT can be used to reduce levels of shame and self-criticism in adults with severe obesity OBJECTIVES: The objective of the current study is to assess and compare a CFT group intervention to Treatment as Usual (TAU) with regard to psychological functioning, specifically self-compassion, shame, self-criticism, emotional eating and mood.

NCT ID: NCT03249324 Active, not recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

Preventing Obesity in Military Communities: Mother-Baby

Start date: November 2014
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Women with pre-pregnancy obesity, women who exceed recommended weight gain during pregnancy, and children who experience rapid and excess growth during the first year of life are all at risk for subsequent obesity. The purpose of this study is to examine creative cognitive strategies to promote healthy weight gain during pregnancy, creating a sound substrate of metabolic programming for the critical first six months of life. A trans-disciplinary approach utilizing a patient- and family-centered intervention and active patient engagement with counseling for positive gain will work with women to shape lifestyle during pregnancy and postpartum, and when feeding their infants in the first 6 months of life. It is hypothesized patient engagement with counseling for positive gains will successfully mitigate excess weight gain in both pregnancy and infancy compared to usual care. Moreover, data will be examined to assess whether psychological variables, work and school climate, and social support factors influence body weight gain trajectories and/or weight loss during and after pregnancy.

NCT ID: NCT03248921 Recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

The Impact of Obesity on Postoperative Outcomes Following Cardiac Surgery

OPOS
Start date: November 2014
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

The purpose of this study is to identify measures of obesity, functional capacity, and specific biomarkers that may be predictive of obesity and post-operative outcomes.

NCT ID: NCT03248804 Completed - Obesity Clinical Trials

Effect of Soy Protein and Colorado Diet on Weight Loss and Maintenance

Start date: March 10, 2015
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Dietary protein is a key element of most effective weight loss regimens. This study will investigate the effects of consuming soy protein on body composition and cardiometabolic health within the context of an effective weight loss and maintenance program called the Colorado Diet.

NCT ID: NCT03248414 Recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

Investigation of Anti-obesity Properties of Lactobacillus Sakei in Obese Human Subjects

Start date: August 10, 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

In this study, we are going to investigate the efficacy of Lactobacillus Sakei on reduction of fat mass assessed by DEXA compared to plaebo.

NCT ID: NCT03248219 Recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

The Sleep in Pregnancy Study

SiP
Start date: March 15, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) insidiously worsens metabolic function, heightens insulin resistance (IR), and in pregnancy is thought to precipitate gestational diabetes, preterm birth, growth restriction, gestational hypertension, and preeclampsia. Despite the fact that sleep disturbances are common during pregnancy, SDB remains under-recognized, under-diagnosed, and poorly understood, particularly in pregnancies affected by obesity. Sixty percent of pregnancies are now affected by obesity, yet the relationship between SDB, patterns of glycemia, and insulin resistance (IR) in obese pregnant women is a neglected area with major therapeutic implications to improve maternal and infant health. Using a prospective design in which diet and gestational age are highly controlled, the investigators propose to measure SDB (apneas/hypopneas) in obese pregnant women using an ambulatory sleep monitoring system. In parallel, robust patterns of glycemia will be measured with a continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS), followed by a 75g oral glucose tolerance test to measure insulin action. The investigators global hypothesis is that worse SDB in part accounts for higher 24-hour patterns of glycemia in obese normal glucose tolerant (NGT) pregnant women in their 3rd trimester. We will test the hypothesis that: 1) In obese NGT pregnant women at 32-34 weeks gestation on a controlled eucaloric diet, higher apnea hypopnea index (AHI) will be positively associated with 24-hour glycemia measured by a CGMS and that, 2) Higher AHI in obese NGT pregnant women at 32-34 weeks gestation on a eucaloric controlled diet will be associated with higher insulin resistance measured by a 75g oral glucose tolerance test (Matsuda Model). Early identification and treatment has the potential to decrease long-term maternal cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

NCT ID: NCT03246997 Recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

Project Powerfood: Promoting Food Security, Equity, and Health

Start date: June 21, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Project Powerfood is a pilot program aimed at addressing food insecurity and food access in primary care through the implementation of a food prescription program in collaboration with a number of community partners. The objectives of this project are: 1. Implement screening for food insecurity in adult and pediatric primary care practices at Mount Sinai. 2. Provide fresh fruit and vegetable "prescriptions" to be redeemed for farm shares from local partner, the Corbin Hill Food Project. Prescriptions will provide 50% off of a fruit and vegetable box. Participants will have the option to purchase 2 boxes per month for 6 months. 3. Pilot prescriptions with 50 adult patients with poorly-controlled diabetes and 50 obese children who are food insecure and/or receive SNAP and/or WIC benefits. Examine/evaluate: 1. Feasibility of program in a busy primary care practice 2. Outcomes before and after the intervention (at baseline, 6 and 12 months), including diet, diabetes control, and body mass index (BMI) 3. Outcomes in a comparison group (that will receive the food prescriptions beginning at 6 months)