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Obesity clinical trials

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NCT ID: NCT02779790 Active, not recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

Meta-analyses of the Effect of Liquid Meal Replacements on Cardiometabolic Risk

Start date: April 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

Obesity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Weight loss is an important therapeutic goal for overweight and obese patients to reduce their risk of developing cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Liquid meal replacements (LMRs) are simple tools that may aid in weight loss and may improve weight-related risk cardiometabolic risk factors. There is a need to synthesize the evidence on LMRs and cardiometabolic risk to inform clinical practice guidelines. The authors propose to conduct a series of systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials to evaluate the effect of LMRs on 4 areas of cardiometabolic risk: markers of adipsoity, glycemic control, established lipid targets, and blood pressure.

NCT ID: NCT02779647 Completed - Clinical trials for To Analyse the Prevalence of Sleep Apnea

Play as a Method to Reduce Overweight and Obesity in Children.

Kids-Play
Start date: October 2012
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Introduction Overweight and obesity are characterised by excess fat, which results in weight gain and is identified by the Body Mass Index (BMI). Studies show that overweight and obesity are the result of a complex interaction between genetic and environmental factors, which begins prenatally. Various studies have shown that physical exercise is an important component of weight loss programmes and that it also benefits the metabolic profile. Other authors have reported that greater weight loss is achieved by a programme that includes both diet and exercise, rather than either of these alone. Aim The aim of this study is to analyse an intervention based on play as a means of improving the body composition of children with overweight or obesity. Design / Method The design of the Kids-Play study is based on cases and controls. The study was conducted in Granada (Spain) from October 2014 to June 2015. The analysis sample of 54 children was divided into two groups: cases, consisting of 27 children, who participated in an intervention programme based on physical activity, play and nutritional advice (to both the child and the parents); and controls, another 27 children, who received only nutritional advice.

NCT ID: NCT02779075 Not yet recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

Exendin-9,39 and Satiety After Bariatric Surgery

Start date: June 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The overall aim of the application is to determine the contribution of the elevated incretin hormone concentrations seen after certain types of bariatric surgery to the regulation of food intake and satiety.

NCT ID: NCT02777762 Not yet recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

Strategies to Promote Physical Activity

Start date: August 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Getting regular physical activity has many health benefits. Current physical activity programs often encourage people to track their physical activity as a way to motivate them to continue being physically active over time. However, not everyone enjoys physical activity, so tracking physical activity may not be very motivating. This research study will evaluate whether a new program—specifically designed to enhance people's enjoyment of physical activity—improves people's attitudes toward physical activity compared to a program that encourages people to track their physical activity with a mobile app.

NCT ID: NCT02777489 Recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

Influence of Carboxypeptidase D (CPD) Gene on Body Weight and Fat Mass Reduction by Perindopril in Obese Subjects

GPD-01-01
Start date: February 2016
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the Carboxipeptidase D (CPD) genotyping as a predictive biomarker of body weight and/or fat mass reduction in obese patients treated with perindopril. There is nonclinical and clinical evidence that a subgroup of human subjects may present a decrease in body weight and/or fat mass following treatment with perindopril. Although the individual characteristics that determine such effect are still unknown, Gene PreDiT SA (Biocant Park, Cantanhede, Portugal) discovered that certain genetic characteristics (e.g., single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of CPD gene) may play a role and potentially could serve as a potential predictive biomarker of response to perindopril. These promising results, along with the fact that perindopril is a medicine already in use in clinical practice, led Gene PreDiT SA to decide to proceed with the development of a theranostic approach for the treatment of obesity. Such theranostic approach consists on the use of CPD genotyping to identify obese subjects that could present improved body weight and fat mass reduction following treatment with perindopril. The current clinical trial aims to prove the concept and provide data to design further confirmatory studies. Additionally this study will evaluate the association between CPD SNPs genotypes and response to perindopril; the effect of perindopril in waist circumference, waist/hip ratio, and BMI and the tolerability and safety of perindopril in the study population.

NCT ID: NCT02777177 Recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

Ecological Momentary Assessment of Behavioral and Psychosocial Predictors of Weight Loss Following Bariatric Surgery

Start date: May 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

Bariatric surgery is a powerful tool for producing significant and durable weight loss. Yet, not all patients achieve initial weight loss success and many patients have weight regain as early as 1-2 years post-surgery. Suboptimal weight loss patterns not fully explained by surgical, demographic, and medical factors has led to greater emphasis on patient behaviors evidenced by clinical guidelines that focus on appropriate eating and physical activity. However, research to inform such guidelines typically has relied on imprecise measures or not been specific to bariatric surgery. There is also little understanding of mechanisms by which psychosocial factors influence outcomes. Thus, there is a need to: (a) measure behaviors and psychosocial factors thought to be related to surgical outcomes (particularly those emphasized in guidelines) using innovative strategies to maximize data quality, (b) determine which behaviors and psychosocial factors are related to outcomes, and (c) explore how psychosocial factors influence weight both directly and via influences on behavior. Our research team was the first to employ innovative mobile health (mHealth) technology within an Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) framework to measure adherence to recommended behaviors at 6 months post-surgery. The investigators propose to build on this work by using EMA to measure behavioral, psychosocial, and environmental factors over a longer period to understand how they predict success and risk after surgery. An NIH-funded multi-sensor PiLR HEALTH platform will integrate objective sensor data measuring behaviors and the environments in which they are performed with self-report information collected via smartphone in real-time and in patients' natural environment. Participants (N=100) recruited from 2 ASMBS-designated centers of excellence will complete a 10-day EMA protocol pre-surgery and at 3, 6, and 12 months post-surgery to assess recommended behaviors [e.g., meal frequency, PA], psychosocial indicators with the most prior evidence of an association with surgical outcomes (e.g., mood/depression), and key environmental factors (e.g., type/quality of the food environment). Participants will also be weighed at the above time points. Along with describing patterns in behaviors and their relation to weight loss, the investigators will test causal models to understand how complex systems of behavioral, psychosocial, and environmental factors affect weight loss, and to identify optimal targets for intervention. This project has the potential to build a much more sophisticated and valid understanding of who is and is not successful after bariatric surgery and why. This new understanding will directly contribute to improved (i.e., specific, consistent, and validated) guidelines for recommended pre and postoperative behaviors, which could lead to improved surgical outcomes. The enhanced understanding will also inform behavioral, psychosocial, and environmental targets for intervention that are mostly likely to improve surgical outcomes.

NCT ID: NCT02773355 Not yet recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

Timely Detection of Pancreatitis Cases as Well as Cases of Suspicion of Serious and Non-serious Adverse Reactions Possibly or Probably Related to Saxenda® in Mexican Patients

Start date: May 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

This trial is conducted in North America. The aim is to investigate timely detection of pancreatitis cases as well as cases of suspicion of serious and non-serious adverse reactions possibly or probably related to Saxenda® in Mexican patients.

NCT ID: NCT02773069 Not yet recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

The Church as a Bridge to Deliver Health Resources Via Telehealth

Start date: June 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The proposed Church Bridge intervention project will provide an innovative, evidence-based and technology supported, health intervention model for Southern, African American, and rural populations who continue to be disparately burdened by obesity and associated co-morbidities (i.e., hypertension, diabetes, cardiovascular disease). By targeting young adults (21-50 years of age) with families, the project will contribute to the long-term reduction of preventable chronic disease and related health care costs for the public.

NCT ID: NCT02769585 Completed - Obesity Clinical Trials

Efficacy of Self-hypnosis for Weight Loss in Type 2 Diabetics

Start date: July 2013
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Randomized study evaluating self-hypnosis versus certified diabetes educator training for weight loss in type 2 diabetics.

NCT ID: NCT02767440 Not yet recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

Families on Track: A Digital Health Behavioral Intervention for Parents Seeking Treatment for Their Child With Obesity

Start date: June 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Current models of outpatient childhood obesity treatment focus on the child's health habits, with limited efficacy. In part, this may be because childhood obesity is highly sensitive to parental lifestyle habits, who are often not a direct target of child obesity interventions. This study aims to target weight loss among overweight parents of 2-16 year old children with obesity enrolled in the Duke Healthy Lifestyles Program (HL) in order to augment child body mass index reduction. The intervention, " Families on Track" is a digital health intervention platform using the Interactive Obesity Treatment Approach (iOTA).