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Obesity clinical trials

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NCT ID: NCT03556059 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Postoperative Complications

Procedure Selection in Obesity and Metabolic Surgery Based on EOSS

Start date: February 2015
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The Edmonton Obesity Staging System (EOSS) is a more comprehensive measure of obesity-related diseases and predictor of mortality than BMI or waist circumference. EOSS is also important in predicting post - operative outcome and 30-day mortality after metabolic surgery. The aim of this study is to determine whether EOSS could be an indicator for procedure selection in obesity and metabolic surgery.

NCT ID: NCT03555110 Recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

Effects of EMDR Therapy in Patients With Severe Obesity

Start date: February 1, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The aims of the study are to perform psychological intervention using EMDR Therapy (Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing Therapy) in the preoperative period, evaluate the personality of each patient through the PFB test (Personality Factor Battery Test) at different times, compare the results obtained in the PFB test at different times of application and verify the existence of changes in the five major Personality Factors: Neuroticism, Extroversion, Socialization, Realization and Openness.

NCT ID: NCT03553927 Recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

Investigating the Physiological Effects of Weight Loss on Male Fertility

Start date: May 16, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of this study is to determine the physiological effects of weight loss on seminal parameters in male participants with reduced reproductive capacity. Learning more about the physiological role of weight loss on reproductive function and metabolic profile of overweight and obese men may give us a better understanding of male fertility and improve the management of patients with reduced fertility. The effects of weight loss on seminal quality are not well understood.

NCT ID: NCT03552367 Recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

Structured Exercise Prescription Program in Obese Children

Start date: December 1, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This controlled clinical trial aims to compare the effects of a multicomponent program that includes structured personalized exercise prescription in children with obesity with a control group that will be enrolled in a multicomponent program without structured personalized exercise prescription. All children will be followed for a period of 6 months. The parameters that will be evaluated between groups are physical fitness, anthropometry, metabolic (glucose oral tolerance curve, lipids, HOMA-IR, ISI-MATSUDA), early cardiovascular damage, inflammatory biomarkers, anxiety and depression scores, and allelic variants related to physical fitness.

NCT ID: NCT03548987 Recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

Research Study Investigating How Well Semaglutide Works in People Suffering From Overweight or Obesity

STEP 4
Start date: June 4, 2018
Phase: Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

This study will look at the change in participant's body weight from the start to the end of the study. This is to compare the effect on body weight in people taking semaglutide (a new medicine) and people taking "dummy" medicine. In addition to taking the medicine, the participant will have talks with study staff about healthy food choices, how to be more physically active and what a participant can do to lose weight. The participant will get semaglutide for the first 20 weeks. Then the participant will get either semaglutide or "dummy" medicine - which treatment the participant gets after the 20 weeks is decided by chance. The participants will need to take 1 injection once a week. The study medicine is injected with a thin needle in a skin fold in the stomach, thigh or upper arm. The study will last for about 1.5 years.

NCT ID: NCT03548948 Recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

Obesity, Iron Regulation and Colorectal Cancer Risk

Start date: July 15, 2015
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Obesity is an independent risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC) although the underlying mechanisms have not been elucidated. Dietary nutrients play a key role in both the prevention and promotion of CRC. While iron is an essential nutrient, excess iron is associated with carcinogenesis. Unlike the systemic compartment, the intestinal lumen lacks an efficient system to regulate iron. In conditions when dietary iron malabsorption and intestinal inflammation co-exist, greater luminal iron is associated with increased intestinal inflammation and a shift in the gut microbiota to more pro-inflammatory strains. However, treatments designed to reduce luminal, including diet restriction and chelation, are associated with lower intestinal inflammation and the colonization of protective gut microbes. Obesity is associated with inflammation-induced, hepcidin-mediated, iron metabolism dysfunction characterized by iron deficiency and dietary iron malabsorption. Obesity is also linked to intestinal inflammation. Currently, there is a fundamental gap in understanding how altered iron metabolism impacts CRC risk in obesity. The investigator's objective is to conduct a crossover controlled feeding trial of: 1) a "Typical American" diet with "high" heme/non-heme iron", 2) a "Typical American" diet with "low" iron, and 3) a Mediterranean diet with "high" non heme iron and examine effects on colonic and systemic inflammation and the gut microbiome.

NCT ID: NCT03548935 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Metabolism and Nutrition Disorder

STEP 1: Research Study Investigating How Well Semaglutide Works in People Suffering From Overweight or Obesity

STEP 1
Start date: June 4, 2018
Phase: Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

This study will look at the change in participants' body weight from the start to the end of the study. The weight loss in participants taking semaglutide (a new medicine) will be compared to the weight loss of participants taking "dummy" medicine. In addition to taking the medicine, participants will have talks with study staff about healthy food choices, how to be more physically active and what you can do to lose weight. Participants will either get semaglutide or "dummy" medicine - which treatment participants get, is decided by chance. Participants will need to take 1 injection once a week. The study medicine is injected with a thin needle in a skin fold in the stomach, thigh or upper arm. The study will last for about 1.5 years. Participants will have 15 clinic visits and 10 phone calls with the study doctor.

NCT ID: NCT03548103 Recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

Green Tea Extract for Obesity of Psychiatric Patients

GEOP
Start date: May 20, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Obesity or metabolic syndrome is becoming a global epidemic and common health problem, leading to the increase of associated comorbidities such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and certain cancers. This phenomenon is also a serious problem among psychiatric patients due to the increase use of second generation antipsychotics and mood stabilizers such as lithium or valproic acid. These metabolic abnormalities can be regarded as medical comorbidities, and have an impact not only on physical health and increased hospital length of stay, but also on a lower functional outcome, low self-esteem and poorer quality of life and non-compliance to antipsychotics. Green tea is one of the most popular beverages in the world and is believed to have beneficial effects in prevention and treatment of many diseases, such as cancer-prevention, adjunct to chemotherapy for malignancy, to reduce mental and physical stress and improve memory function, to increase bone mineral density, and to decrease body weight. Since weight gain is a common and undesirable side effect with psychiatric medications, the management of it becomes an important issue in clinical practice. In this clinical trial, we will use decaffeinated green tea extract to treat overweight patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study design.

NCT ID: NCT03545360 Recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

Safety and Efficacy of the BTL-703 Treatment for the Non-invasive Lipolysis

Start date: March 1, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The study will evaluate safety and efficacy of the BTL-703 device for the non-invasive lipolysis.

NCT ID: NCT03543644 Recruiting - Healthy Clinical Trials

Strategies To OPpose SUGARS With Non-nutritive Sweeteners Or Water (STOP SUGARS NOW) Trial

Start date: May 31, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Health authorities recommend a reduction in added sugars from sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) due to risk of obesity and diabetes. As a sugar-reduction strategy, finding the ideal SSB replacement is of utmost importance. Those who are already consuming SSBs might not easily replace it with water and therefore non-nutritive sweetened beverages (NSBs) present a sweetened alternative though guidelines recommend water instead of NSBs as a replacement for SSBs. Recent evidence suggests that saccharine , a non-nutritive sweetener, which is not found in NSBs, might induce glucose intolerance by altering gut microbiota in humans. It is currently not known if replacing SSBs with NSBs (which contain low-calorie sweeteners other than saccharine) or water will have any effect on the human gut microbiota and any downstream diabetic risk. The investigators plan to undertake a randomized controlled cross-over trial in 75 healthy adults to assess the effect of replacing SSBs with equal amounts of NSBs or water for 4 weeks on the composition and diversity of human gut microbiota, changes in glucose tolerance and total body fat in those who regularly drink SSBs. Each participant will act as their own control receiving each of the three interventions of SSB, NSB and water for four weeks in random order, each period separated by a four-week wash-out period. All study visits will occur at the Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Centre at St. Michael's Hospital. This study will contribute to knowledge that will inform dietary guidelines and public policy with regards to the best possible replacement for SSBs. It will also shed light on the potential mechanism of the adverse effects of NSBs and if the replacement of SSBs by NSBs or water are in fact similar with respect to their effect on gut bacteria and any downstream diabetic risk.