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Coronary Artery Disease clinical trials

View clinical trials related to Coronary Artery Disease.

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NCT ID: NCT05427084 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Coronary Artery Disease

Canagliflozin Targeting Vascular Inflammation

CANTORSING
Start date: September 2022
Phase: Phase 2/Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

CANTOR SING is a pilot single center double blinded randomized study. The investigators will compare the effect of canagliflozin (300 mg daily - intervention arm) vs. placebo (control group) on the FDG aortic uptake in patients with stable CAD (over 60 days post-myocardial infarction) after a 6-month period of treatment. The investigators plan to enroll 8 patients in each arm (total sample size: 16 patients). Primary endpoint is the change in FDG aortic uptake between baseline and 6 months in each arm.

NCT ID: NCT05424705 Active, not recruiting - Clinical trials for Coronary Artery Disease

Prediction of Atherosclerotic Plaque Progression

PPP
Start date: January 15, 2015
Phase:
Study type: Observational

To predict coronary atherosclerosis progression in patients with acute coronary syndrome by the use of intracoronary imaging methods. To investigate the ability of NIRS to detect vulnerable plaque characterized by the presence of OCT-defined TCFA To study the influence of gene polymorphisms (in genes playing role in vessel dilatation) on the progression of coronary atherosclerosis and clinical outcomes

NCT ID: NCT05423379 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Coronary Artery Disease

XIENCE Skypoint Large Vessel Post Approval Study

SPIRIT XLV PAS
Start date: November 4, 2022
Phase:
Study type: Observational

SPIRIT XLV PAS is a prospective, single arm, multi-center, US and OUS post-approval observational study to evaluate the continued safety and effectiveness of the XIENCE Skypoint Large Vessel Everolimus Eluting Coronary Stent System (EECSS) Large Vessel (LV) sizes (diameter 4.5 mm and 5.0 mm) during commercial use in a real-world setting.

NCT ID: NCT05421169 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Coronary Artery Disease

Diastolic Hyperemia-Free Ratio in Patients With CAD

ICE-HEAT
Start date: June 30, 2022
Phase:
Study type: Observational [Patient Registry]

The investigators aimed to identify the value of concordance between the diastolic hyperemia-free ratio (DFR) and fractional flow reserve (FFR) during pre-interventional and post-interventional period using a 0.014" COMET II Pressure Guidewire

NCT ID: NCT05418556 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Coronary Artery Disease

Tailored Versus Coventional AntiPlaTelet Strategy Intended After OPTIMIZEd Drug Eluting Stent

OPTIMIZE-APT
Start date: July 30, 2022
Phase: Phase 4
Study type: Interventional

Objectives: To assess the safety of tailored antiplatelet therapy (short DAPT followed by P2Y12 inhibitor alone strategy) in patients who received optimized DES implantation guided by intravascular imaging (IVUS or OCT) Hypothesis: Tailored antiplatelet strategy (short DAPT followed by P2Y12 inhibitor alone) is superior to conventional antiplatelet strategy in terms of clinically relevant bleeding and noninferior for ischemic composite adverse events in patients who received intravascular imaging-guided optimized DES implantation. (Optimized stent evaluated by on-site IVUS/OCT could act as an essential criterion for decision making for tailored antithrombotic strategy)

NCT ID: NCT05417893 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Coronary Artery Disease

Non-inferiority Clinical Trial to Compare the Safety and Performance of MeRes100 Sirolimus-eluting BioResorbable Vascular Scaffold System Versus Contemporary DES Platforms in Patients With de Novo Coronary Artery Lesions

MeRethonRCT
Start date: October 15, 2022
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This is a prospective, open-label, multicentre, randomized, non-inferiority clinical trial to compare the safety and performance of MeRes100 Sirolimus-eluting BioResorbable Vascular Scaffold System versus Contemporary drug-eluting stent platforms in patients with de novo coronary artery lesions at 60 investigational sites globally (including India). The primary objective of this study is to evaluate safety and performance of MeRes100 BRS in comparison with XIENCE family EES/Resolute ZES/Synergy EES/BioMime/Metafor/Proficient family SES in patients with de novo coronary artery lesions with reference vessel diameter of ≥2.75 mm to ≤4.0 mm and lesion length ≤34 mm. Subject's Clinical/Telephonic Follow-up will be taken at [Time Frame: 30 days (± 7 days) clinical follow-up, 6 month (± 28 days) clinical follow-up, 1 year (± 28 days) clinical follow-up, 2 years (± 28 days) telephonic follow-up, 3 years (± 28 days) clinical follow-up, 4 years (± 28 days) telephonic follow-up and 5 years (± 28 days) clinical follow-up]

NCT ID: NCT05417763 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Coronary Artery Disease

Sensor-equipped Ultrathin Pressure Microcatheter Versus Pressure Wire for Physiological Measurements

SUPREME II
Start date: February 25, 2022
Phase:
Study type: Observational

TruePhysio pressure microcatheter is a novel device for evaluating the functional significance of coronary stenosis, and has been validated in the previous SUPREME study (NCT03541577). This study will further evaluate the safety and efficacy of the physiological indices measured by the TruePhysio pressure microcatheter, with respect to the physiological indices measured by the Pressure Wire.

NCT ID: NCT05417217 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Coronary Artery Disease

The Effect of Continued Mechanical Ventilation on the Occurrence of Myocardial Ischemia

VENTMICS-II
Start date: September 1, 2022
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The goal of this study is to examine the influence of mechanical ventilation on the occurrence of myocardial ischemia in patients undergoing endo-CABG.

NCT ID: NCT05416385 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Cardiovascular Diseases

Carotid Intraplaque Neovascularization Combined With Stress Echo

CIRCE
Start date: August 16, 2021
Phase:
Study type: Observational

The root cause of heart attacks and strokes is atherosclerosis, the hardening and thickening of blood vessels due to the presence of "plaque" which is a build-up of fat and cholesterol in the walls of vessels. To diagnose heart disease, patients receive a stress test to find out if they require surgery. Up to 52% of patients receiving an angiogram (surgery) to look at plaque blockages in the heart are found to be normal (no blockage). Patients who are suspected of having heart disease often undergo a stress test, which helps cardiologists decide if the patient has heart disease, but stress tests can give false results. In Ontario alone, 90% are stress tests are found to be normal and patients are sent home with little follow-up. Of these 3-5% (~4,000 patients/year) will have a major cardiovascular event (heart attack, surgery, or death) within 3 years. We need to improve the stress test accuracy to reduce cardiac outcome. We now know that it is not just the total amount of plaque that leads to heart attacks and strokes, but the composition of the plaque that can lead to breakage causing a heart attack. Plaques are soft and fragile, and typically contain fat and small leaky blood vessels within their cores. If we are able to identify patients that have leaky plaques using ultrasound, we may be able to improve the accuracy of stress testing. We propose a study looking at the combination of stress testing (assessing heart function) and neck ultrasound (assessing plaque composition), to identify patients at risk for cardiovascular events (heart attacks and death). We will enrol patients from 6 sites across Canada and follow-them for cardiac outcome for 3 years.

NCT ID: NCT05415085 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Coronary Artery Disease

Culprit-first in Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

Start date: May 1, 2021
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The aim of this study is to assess the impact of culprit-first versus culprit-last percutaneous coronary intervention on the door to balloon time and clinical outcomes in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction.