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Cardiovascular Disease clinical trials

View clinical trials related to Cardiovascular Disease.

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NCT ID: NCT05072483 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Cardiovascular Disease

Natural History Study of CADASIL

Start date: October 27, 2021
Phase:
Study type: Observational

Small vessel diseases are conditions characterized by the narrowing of small arteries leading to an imbalance of blood supply upon demand. This results in a progressive chronic hypoperfusion with detrimental outcomes for the affected organ system and for the patient. Recent advances in genetic evaluation have identified several genetic variants causing cerebrovascular small vessel diseases. These diseases have common clinical presentation including recurrent strokes, progressive white matter degeneration, and debilitating dementia. The link between these pathologies is defects in the tunica media of arteries, which is composed mainly of vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMCs). CADASIL (cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarct and leukoencephalopathy) is caused by mutations in NOTCH3. The disease is of slow onset, with initial clinical manifestations in the third and fourth decade of life, but progressive and fatal. Predominant clinical features include migraine with aura (atypical or isolated), strokes, memory loss, and multiple psychiatric symptoms including dementia. Currently, CADASIL is considered the most common hereditary subcortical vascular dementia. However, treatments are symptomatic therapyand there is little prospect of future therapies to directly address causation and block progression. We propose to characterize the etiology and natural history of CADASIL subjects through comprehensive clinical and molecular characterizations. Subjects will be seen at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) every three years for nine years for a total of four NIH Clinical Center visits.

NCT ID: NCT04993794 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Coronary Artery Disease

Additive Anti-inflammatory Action for Critically Ill Patients With Cardiovascular Surgery (Xuebijing) IV

Start date: January 1, 2021
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

XueBiJing, a Chinese herbal derived therapeutic, has been approved to treat severe infections (sepsis) in critically ill patients (China Food and Drug Administration; Beijing, China, Number Z20040033). Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) will produce large amounts of inflammatory mediators and oxygen free radicals, which causes the lipid peroxidation damage and mononuclear cell migration, thus aggravating organ inflammation and damage. Therefore, exploring new methods to prevent and alleviate organ injury caused by CPB is an important topi in clinical practice. However, little knowledge is regarding the effect of Xuebijing injection on CPB-related organ injury. To answer these questions, the authors conducted this randomized trial to compare XueBiJing with placebo in critically ill patients with cardiovascular surgery.

NCT ID: NCT04977583 Not yet recruiting - Hypertension Clinical Trials

Unmet Social Needs Study

Start date: February 1, 2022
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The impacts of unmet social needs, such as homelessness, inconsistent access to food, and exposure to violence on health are well-established, especially for cardiovascular disease. A limited but growing body of evidence suggests that screening for and addressing these needs - also referred as social determinants of health -- in clinic settings helps to connect patients to resources to address unmet needs and has the potential to improve health outcomes. Veterans carry a high burden of unmet needs. At present, VA systematically screens for only two unmet needs; homelessness and food insecurity. The investigators propose to assess the efficacy of systematically screening Veterans for nine unmet needs (i.e., housing, food insecurity, utility insecurity, transportation, legal problems, employment, safety, stress, and social isolation), and compare the effect of referral mechanisms of varying intensity on Veterans' connection to resources, reduction of unmet needs, treatment adherence, reduced preventable hospitalizations, and clinical outcomes.

NCT ID: NCT04939311 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Cardiovascular Disease

Immunomodulation Using VB-201 to Reduce Arterial Inflammation in Treated HIV - VITAL HIV Trial

Start date: July 1, 2022
Phase: Phase 1/Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This study is a double blinded, placebo-controlled, randomized, parallel group study, designed to compare the efficacy and safety of VB-201 80mg taken orally once daily to placebo for anti-inflammation in HIV-infected subjects.

NCT ID: NCT04927429 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Cardiovascular Disease

Technical Development of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Start date: October 27, 2021
Phase:
Study type: Observational

Background: In the U.S., over 6.5 million people have heart failure. Researchers want to develop new testing methods for cardiovascular problems using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to improve the clinical diagnosis and management of people with heart failure. Objective: To develop and test new methods for imaging the heart and blood vessels using MRI. Eligibility: People ages 18 years and older who are having an MRI of their heart or blood vessels. Healthy volunteers are also needed. Design: Participants will be screened with a medical history. Participants will have a physical exam and blood tests. They will have an electrocardiogram (ECG) to measure the heart s electrical activity. Then they will have their scheduled MRI scan. The MRI scanner is a large, hollow tube. Participants will lie on a table that moves in and out of the tube. During the MRI, they may have contrast dye injected through an intravenous line inserted into their arm or hand. ECG may be used to monitor their heartbeat or coordinate pictures with their heartbeat. A flexible belt may be used to monitor their breathing. A finger probe may be used to track their heart rate and/or oxygenation level. Their blood pressure may be measured. Pictures may be taken of their blood vessels, heart, and lungs before, during, and after they get medicine to increase blood flow. They may lie flat and pedal a stress bicycle to increase their heart rate. Participation will last for 5 years. During that time, participants may receive a yearly survey about their health. They may be contacted for an optional follow-up MRI within 2 years of their MRI.

NCT ID: NCT04911153 Not yet recruiting - Metabolic Syndrome Clinical Trials

Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Risk in Post-9/11 Veterans

Start date: November 1, 2021
Phase:
Study type: Observational

Heart disease and diabetes are leading causes of death and disability in the US, especially among Veterans. Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a disabling condition that also affects many Veterans. New research suggests that PTSD further increases the risk of developing heart disease and diabetes. What causes this increased risk is unknown. However, individuals with PTSD are often less physically active and make more unhealthy dietary choices than individuals without PTSD. Maintaining a physically active lifestyle, staying physically fit, and eating a healthy diet may be important for reducing the PTSD related risk for heart disease, diabetes and disability. The proposed research seeks to assess how important these lifestyle factors are for reducing the risk of heart disease, diabetes and disability in Veterans with and without PTSD. A better understanding of these lifestyle factors and cardiometabolic health in Veterans will help to clarify how lifestyle interventions can best be applied to the prevention and treatment of long-term disability in Veterans. Aim 1: To examine physical activity participation as a mechanism linking PTSD to cardiometabolic health and functioning in post-9/11 Veterans. This study will longitudinally assess associations between PTSD diagnosis, physical activity, cardiometabolic health, and functioning over time in 250 TRACTS participants. H1-1: Total self-report physical activity will mediate the effects of PTSD on cardiometabolic health and functioning over time, such that lower physical activity will increase the detrimental effect of PTSD on cardiometabolic health and functioning. H1-2: physical activity intensity will moderate the effect physical activity has on cardiometabolic health and functioning. Aim 2: To examine diet quality as a mechanism linking PTSD to cardiometabolic health and functioning in post-9/11 Veterans. This study will longitudinally assess associations between PTSD diagnosis, diet quality, cardiometabolic health, and functioning over time in 200 TRACTS participants. H2: Self-report dietary intake will mediate the effects of PTSD on cardiometabolic health and functioning over time, such that a poor diet will increase the detrimental effect of PTSD on cardiometabolic health and functioning. Supplemental Aim: To validate the use of a self-report clinical measure of physical activity against objective measure obtained via accelerometry. Objective measurement of physical activity is not often accessible or feasible for VA providers (e.g., time constraints). It is essential that quick self-report physical activity measures accurately reflect the physical activity of Veterans. This study will compare data from a self-report clinical physical activity measure to objectively measured physical activity/sedentary time (i.e., accelerometry), cardiorespiratory fitness, cardiometabolic health, functioning, and PTSD symptom severity in 100 post-9/11 Veterans. H1A-1: Self-report and objective measurement of physical activity will be significantly correlated. H1A-2: Both self-report and objectively measured physical activity/sedentary time will be associated with cardiorespiratory fitness, cardiometabolic health, functioning, and PTSD symptom severity.

NCT ID: NCT04798430 Enrolling by invitation - Clinical trials for Familial Hypercholesterolemia

Long-term Efficacy and Safety of OLE LIB003 in HoFH, HeFH, and High-risk CVD Patients Requiring Further LDL-C Reduction

LIBerate-OLE
Start date: December 3, 2020
Phase: Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

The study is to assess the long-term safety, tolerability, and efficacy after 48 and 72 weeks with monthly (Q4W [<31 days]) dosing of subcutaneous (SC) LIB003 300 mg administered in patients with CVD or at high risk for CVD (including HoFH and HeFH) on stable diet and oral LDL-C lowering drug therapy who completed one of the LIB003 Phase 3 base studies.

NCT ID: NCT04778891 Completed - Clinical trials for Cardiovascular Diseases in Old Age

The Impact of Comprehensive Medication Management Services on Clinical Outcomes in Patients With Cardiovascular Diseases at Primary Care Level

Start date: January 8, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Patients with established cardiovascular disease (CVD) often have multiple medications that increase the risk of prevalence of drug therapy problems (DTP), subsequently leading to unfavourable clinical and health outcomes. By providing Comprehensive Medication Management (CMM) services to patients within a healthcare system, pharmacists assess patients' medication-related needs, identify and prevent DTP, develop individualized care plan for each individual patient and evaluate and monitor outcomes. Thus, the CMM services delivered at the primary care level in collaboration with general practitioners and other healthcare providers could address this problem and by optimizing therapy improve patients' clinical outcomes and quality of life. Studies have shown that patients with chronic diseases have the greatest benefit from the CMM services. The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of CMM services on clinical and humanistic outcomes in patients with established CVD. The study will employ prospective, longitudinal, pre- and postintervention study with a 1-year patient follow-up.

NCT ID: NCT04749927 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Cardiovascular Disease

Deep Learning of Retinal Photographs and Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease

Start date: October 11, 2020
Phase:
Study type: Observational

The research team has developed a deep learning algorithm that predicts anthropometric factors from fundus photographs and an algorithm that predicts cardiovascular disease risk. Fundus photographs are taken for various cardiovascular diseases (myocardial infarction, heart failure, hypertension with target organ damage, high-risk dyslipidemia, diabetic patients, and low-risk hypertension patients), and a deep learning algorithm for predicting developed anthropometric factors will be validated. Fundus photographs will also be taken twice in the first year, and additional fundus photographs will be taken two years later. Major cardiovascular events will be followed up for 5 years to verify the deep learning algorithm predicting cardiovascular disease risk prospectively.

NCT ID: NCT04726722 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Cardiovascular Disease

Evaluation of a Personcentered Internet-based CBT Program for Stress, Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms in Patients With Cardiovascular Disease

Start date: February 2022
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

To evaluate a nine-week adaptable and person-centred I-CBT program that can be directed towards stress, anxiety and depressive symptoms in persons with CVD.