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Hypertension clinical trials

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NCT ID: NCT03587103 Not yet recruiting - Hypertension Clinical Trials

Learning Implementation of Guideline-based Decision Support System for Hypertension Treatment: Testing Alternative Antihypertensive Regimens Using ACE-Inhibitors, Calcium Channel Blockers and Diuretics (LIGHT-ACD)

Start date: July 30, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This trial aims to compare the efficacy of several streamlined guideline-based hypertensive medication regimens initiated with Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitor/Angiotensin Receptor Blocker [A], Calcium Channel Blocker [C] and Diuretic [D].

NCT ID: NCT03577990 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Uncontrolled Hypertension

Technology Coaching Intervention for Black Women With Hypertension

Start date: May 2019
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Hypertension (HTN) is a global problem affecting 972 million adults and an important public health burden since it is the main cause of cardiovascular disease and death, and the second leading cause of disability. Disproportionately affected, Black women have the highest prevalence of hypertension in the United States. This research will evaluate potential interventions for possible community-based strategies for controlling hypertension using interactive self-care strategies with coaching and technology. We hypothesize that participants who receive self-care management and interactive coaching with technology will have lower systolic/diastolic BP and better adherence to antihypertensive medication(s) and lifestyle recommendations post intervention compared to participants receiving self-care management alone.

NCT ID: NCT03576885 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Pulmonary Hypertension

Inhaled Nitric Oxide for Pulmonary Hypertension and Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia

Start date: September 2018
Phase: Phase 1/Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) is an effective treatment for pulmonary hypertension (PH) in term and near-term infants. Preterm infants are at risk for early PH that is associated with high risk for bronchopulmonary dysplasia or death. In multiple clinical trials, iNO treatment was not effective for BPD prevention. However, infants were not screened for PH and iNO treatment was not targeted for PH. iNO treatment for PH in preterm infants is controversial due to lack of evidence. The study team hypothesizes that early diagnosis of PH (72-96 hours of life) and iNO treatment will decrease the incidence of death and bronchopulmonary dysplasia and improve oxygenation in extremely preterm infants. 1. To determine if iNO treatment of extremely preterm infants with early pulmonary hypertension as established with echocardiographic evidence at 72-96 hours of age will decrease incidence of death or BPD. 2. To determine if iNO treatment of extremely preterm infants with early PH will decrease the pulmonary artery pressure and improve oxygenation within 72 hours of intervention.

NCT ID: NCT03566654 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Essential Hypertension

Clinical Trial on Remote Ischemic Conditioning and Hypertension(HOPE)

Start date: July 2018
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

Nowadays, the incidence of stroke in China has reached 1.6‰, and this disease has became a primary cause of death in China. One of its major risk factors is hypertension. As shown in the researches, the risk of stroke grows remarkably when the blood pressure increases and there exists a log-linear relationship between them. Systolic pressure and diastolic pressure relate to the risk of stroke independently. Systolic pressure decreasing 10mmHg will reduce the stroke risk by 31% and decrease of 1~3mmHg will reduce the stroke risk by 20~30%. As to diastolic pressure, 5mmHg decrease of it will reduce the stroke risk by 34% and 10mmHg decrease of it will reduce the stroke risk by 56%. In addition, patients with isolated systolic hypertension (SPB≥160mmHg, DPB≤90mmHg) or critical isolated systolic hypertension (SPB=140~159mmHg, DPB< 90mmHg) will suffer a higher risk of stroke than people with normal blood pressure. The ACC has already revised its Hypertension Management Guidelines of standard of diagnosis for hypertension and timing of starting medical treatment in hypertensive patients.Because more and more reseaches shown that people with blood pressure between 120-139/80-89mmHg have higher risk of ASCVSD compared to those with blood pressure lower than 120/80mmHg; However, in China, the diagnostic criteria for hypertension has not been revised yet. Therefore, we still have blind spot in treating such patients who suffer from borderline systolic hypertension at 130~140 mmHg of blood pressure with or without ASCVD or those with the first stage hypertension but refusing to take anti-hypertension drugs. What is more, most of them are middle-aged adults, once they have stroke, it would lead terrible and costly consequences to both their family and the society. Thus, it is necessary to explore new non-pharmacological methods to control blood pressure for reducing the risk of stroke.

NCT ID: NCT03566329 Not yet recruiting - Hypertension Clinical Trials

Magnesium Sulphate Versus Lidocaine for Control of Emergence Hypertension

Start date: July 2018
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

Post-craniotomy emergence hypertension is a common phenomenon that may predispose to development of intracranial hematoma and cerebral edema.The aim of this study is to compare the safety and efficacy of Mgso4 versus lidocaine infusion for control of emergence hypertension after craniotomy.

NCT ID: NCT03563872 Not yet recruiting - Hypertension Clinical Trials

Enhancing Systems of Care to Improve Hypertension Guideline Implementation

Start date: February 2019
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This study is a prospective cluster randomized trial testing a systems-level strategy to implement current American Heart Association hypertension guidelines in African American communities at risk for cardiovascular related health disparities. The trial will take place within an integrated health system serving Detroit and will assess blood pressure control over one year's time.

NCT ID: NCT03558893 Not yet recruiting - Hypertension Clinical Trials

Health Disparities in Hypertension

Start date: September 1, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This study will be the first to distinguish the relative contributions of sleep, circadian and behavioral mechanisms to the non-dipping BP profile in Black adults and will lay the groundwork for optimizing therapies dependent on mechanisms, such as targeting sleep, targeting circadian rhythmicity, or targeting behaviors, and raising the possibility that ideal therapy for hypertension (HTN) may differ by race. This research will ultimately help to improve health and survival in black populations with HTN.

NCT ID: NCT03557502 Not yet recruiting - Hypertension Clinical Trials

Heat Therapy Versus Exercise Training in Hypertension

Start date: October 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This is a clinical trial to determine whether 30 sessions of heat therapy in the form of hot water immersion is better than 30 sessions of traditional aerobic exercise training on blood pressure reduction in people with elevated or Stage 1 hypertension.

NCT ID: NCT03556761 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Hypertension, Pregnancy-Induced

Furosemide for Accelerated Recovery of Blood Pressure Postpartum

ForBP
Start date: June 2018
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled single center investigation of furosemide's effect on postpartum blood pressure control in pregnancies affected by hypertensive disorders of pregnancy

NCT ID: NCT03556085 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension

Venous Sinus Stenting With the River Stent in IIH

Start date: June 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The objective of the study is to show that stenting the transverse-sigmoid sinus with the River stent is safe and has probable benefit to relieve clinical symptoms in subjects with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). The study will enroll 39 IIH subjects with moderate to severe visual field loss or severe headaches that have failed medical therapy. The primary safety endpoint is the rate of major adverse event at 12 months The primary probable benefit endpoint is a composite at 12 months of absence of significant sinus stenosis and clinically relevant improvement.