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NCT ID: NCT03222596 Active, not recruiting - Pain Clinical Trials

The Impact of Exercise Training on Living Quality in Multiple Sclerosis Individuals

Start date: July 14, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The most common symptom displayed in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) is a pronounced sense of fatigue that can have negative effect on functional ability and quality of life (QOL). An important goal of researchers and clinicians involves improving the QOL of individuals with MS, and the exercise therapy represents potentially modifiable behavior that positively impacts on pathogenesis of MS and thus the QOL. However, the main barrier for its application is low motivational level that MS patients experience due to fatigue with adjacent reduced exercise tolerability and mobility, and muscle weakness. Getting individuals with MS motivated to engage in continuous physical activity may be particularly difficult and challenging, especially those with severe disability or Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS 6-8). Till now, researchers have focused their attention mainly on the moderate or vigorous intensity of exercise and on cardiorespiratory training in MS patients to achieve improvements in daily life quality, less indicating the exercise content, and most importantly, breathing exercises. In addition, it is investigators intention to make exercise for MS patients more applicable and accessible, motivational and easier, but most important, productive. Investigators think that MS patients experience more stress with aerobic exercise or moderate to high intensity programme exercise, and can hardly keep continuum including endurance exercise, or treadmill. Hypothesis: Investigators hypothesis is that 4-weeks of continuous low demanding or mild exercise programme with specific content and an accent on breathing exercise can attenuate primary fatigue in MS patients, especially in those with more severe disability or EDSS from 6-8, and provide maintenance of exercise motivation. Investigators also propose that important assistant factor for final goal achievement is social and mental support of the exercise group (EDSS from 0-8) led by a physiotherapist. This will help to maintain exercise motivation and finally make better psychophysical functioning, and thus better QOL.

NCT ID: NCT03222154 Completed - Pain Clinical Trials

EFFECTS OF SHOCK WAVE THERAPY IN WOMEN WITH PAIN IN TRAPÉZIO MUSCLE

Start date: July 1, 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The study consisted of 60 women who had pain-point pains in the upper fibers of the trapezius muscle. They had a medical age of 22.8 years, with a body mass index of 22.8 kg / cm2.They underwent an initial assessment, with a visual analogue pain scale, followed by an assessment of pain threshold, and manual muscle strength.Then, they were allocated into three groups: control group with 20 volunteers without intervention, placebo group with 20 volunteers with shock wave simulation and an intervention group with 20 volunteers with shock wave therapy. All volunteers were evaluated immediately after the protocol (post evaluation) and 48 hours after the intervention protocol (48 hour evaluation). A mixed ANOVA of repeated measurements was used for intra and intergroup comparisons, followed by tukey post hoc. Significance was set at 5% (p <0.05).

NCT ID: NCT03222050 Completed - Pain Clinical Trials

Effectiveness of Distraction Techniques on Pain Intensity During Immunization Among Infants

Start date: November 2015
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

A study to assess and compare the effectiveness of Distraction techniques on Pain intensity during Immunization among Infants in selected hospital of Ambala, Haryana.

NCT ID: NCT03221439 Not yet recruiting - Pain Clinical Trials

Cognitive Functional Therapy for Chronic Low Back Pain

Start date: August 1, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

There is evidence, of a single randomized controlled trial, that CFT is better than combined manual therapy and motor control exercise for chronic low back pain. However, this study had significant methodological shortcomings regarding the failure to carry out the intention to treat analysis and a considerable loss of follow-up of patients. It is important to replicate this study through a randomized clinical trial with similar objectives in another domain, but correcting these methodological shortcomings. Therefore, the aim of the study is to assess the efficacy of Cognitive Functional Therapy in patients with chronic non specific low back pain.

NCT ID: NCT03221413 Recruiting - Pain Clinical Trials

Transcranial Alternating Current for Oscillopathies

tACS_EEG
Start date: May 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The need for non-invasive, non-pharmacological and cost-effective therapeutic options has revived the use of transcranial current stimulation, either direct (tDCS) or alternating (tACS), in a wide range of pathologies and cognitive disturbances. Results, although often promising, are not unequivocal, possibly due to different stimulation parameters and sites, or non-homogenous patient selection. tDCS has been widely applied but few studies have focused on tACS which has the advantage of potentially entraining brain oscillations at the same frequency of stimulation. This overcomes the basic mechanism of tDCS which deploys anodal or cathodal currents to broadly excite or inhibit supposedly dysfunctional underlying cortex. Whether a stimulation paradigm based on sound neurophysiological markers could provide a better and longer-lasting clinical outcome has not yet been ascertained. The investigators aim to establish, with a trans-disease approach, categories characterized by defective EEG oscillatory activity and related dysfunctional networks. This classification, expected as the result of the first stage of this project, will guide the stimulation paradigm: categories with a pathologically low-band EEG prevalence will be treated with high-frequency tACS, and vice-versa, while the stimulation site will correspond to the defective sites of pathological EEG band maps. Parkinson's disease (PD), the EEG marker of which is a shift towards fast frequencies, and neuropathic pain (NP), with an EEG prevalence of slow bands, will be considered. In order to categorize pathologies on the basis of their EEG frequencies, EEG power spectrums will be derived from resting EEG, and cortical oscillatory reactivity will be assessed by EEG-TMS (electroencephalographic-Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation) co-registration. This method appears to elicit state-dependent brain oscillatory response and is expected to support power spectrum data. The identified prevailing EEG band will be used subsequently to reconstruct scalp EEG band distribution. tACS paradigms will be tailored according to these findings: the anode will be placed over the scalp area corresponding to the dysfunctional rhythm and frequency will be set in order to correct the prevailing EEG band (slow stimulation if fast frequencies prevail, and vice-versa). The translational element of this research proposal will consist of its clinical application in day-to-day practice for the benefit of people with the target conditions. The patient-groups, after undergoing the neurophysiology studies, will be tested with disease-specific scales and a neuropsychological battery. A 2-weeks tACS, either real or active sham, protocol will then be performed (30 minutes/day, 5 days/week), associated with an ad hoc rehabilitation protocol (60 minutes/day 5 days/week). During the last day of stimulation, patients will be tested again with the disease specific scales, neuropsychological battery and standard EEG to detect EEG frequencies modifications. At 4-weeks follow up, the same tests and EEG recording will be carried out, to assess the persistence of after-effects. The expected result is a valid, non-invasive and cost-effective stimulation paradigm based on sound neurophysiologic markers which transcend traditional disease classifications.

NCT ID: NCT03219086 Not yet recruiting - Pain Clinical Trials

Spinal Prilocaine for Caesarian Sections

Start date: August 1, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Prilocaine theoretically could provide faster onset because of its lower pKa (7,7) compared to bupivacaine (8,1). The primary objective of this prospective double blind randomized trial is to determine block onset of spinal hyperbaric prilocaine compared to bupivacaine, both with a small dose of sufentanyl as an additive.The primary hypothesis is that a significant larger amount of patients will gain surgical readiness within 8 minutes after spinal injection of prilocaine with sufentanyl compared to bupivacaine with sufentanyl. Surgical readiness is defined as a sensory block level of T5 tested by loss of cold sensation.

NCT ID: NCT03218306 Not yet recruiting - Pain Clinical Trials

Surgical Pleth Index (SPI) Versus Standard Clinical Approach Analgesia

SPIDER
Start date: October 1, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The study is aimed at confronting a surgical pleth index based protocol for intraoperative analgesia in a desflurane based general anesthesia for thyroidectomy, versus a standard clinical approach. A reduction in analgesic consumption and improvement in hemodynamics are expected.

NCT ID: NCT03218098 Completed - Pain Clinical Trials

Post-Operative Pain After Uniportal Vats Lobectomy: Does A Smaller Incision Result In Better Recovery?

Start date: January 2014
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Post-Operative Pain After Uniportal Vats Lobectomy: Does A Smaller Incision Result In Better Recovery? Postoperative pain control remains one of the most common problems after major lung resection. Pain is considered a major independent factor responsible for increased perioperative morbidity and mortality: in particular, in patients with preoperative compromised clinical conditions. In fact, acute pain may compromise the patient's mobilization and the secretion's clearance with secondary possible bronchial obstruction and parenchymal lung infection. Today, the treatment of postoperative pain after lung resection is based on association of the pharmacological therapy, including systemic use of opioids and non-steroid drugs, epidural analgesia, intercostal nerve block and cryoanalgesia with the minimally invasive surgery, like use of mini-thoracotomy, a thoracoscopic approach or intercostal nerve protection with the use of muscle sparing. In the literature, reduced tissue damage consequent to the use of limited surgical approaches is reported to be significantly effective in decreasing early postoperative pain. Thus, the use of a minimally invasive surgery for lung resections has proved to produce more tolerable pain and allow quicker functional recovery and lower postoperative complications. The aim of this prospective randomized study was to evaluate the equivalency of a smaller incision (4 cm) when compared to a longer length (8 cm) of incision performing uniportal VATS lobectomy in terms of postoperative pain results. Primarily, to evaluate the differences of operative time between the groups. Secondly, to investigate the differences of pain scores between the two groups and the impact of pain reduction on functional results.

NCT ID: NCT03217682 Recruiting - Pain Clinical Trials

Impact of Massage Therapy and Music Therapy on the Quality of Life of Hospice Patients

Start date: July 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This is a cohort study where subjects will receive either massage therapy or music therapy interventions to evaluate their impact on hospice patients.

NCT ID: NCT03216707 Not yet recruiting - Pain Clinical Trials

High Definition Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Motor Cortex Versus Insula

Start date: July 15, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Brain stimulation is a technique that can alter cortical function and thus be suitable for treating pain. This is especially when pain is chronic and associated with functional and even structural reorganization of the central nervous system. The idea of using invasive and noninvasive brain stimulation for pain relief is not new. Studies from the 1950s have investigated the brain stimulation for therapeutic use. Direct implantation of electrodes on the cerebral cortex has been carried out by Tsubokawa and colleagues in Japan. Although reported to be effective, it is invasive and involves the implantation of a foreign body into the cranium. Recent advancements in the techniques of non-invasive brain stimulation have improved and have measurable modulatory effects making this an attractive alternative for treating pain