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NCT ID: NCT03241485 Not yet recruiting - Pain Clinical Trials

Trial Comparing Intrathecal Morphine With Placebo In Patients Undergoing Robotic Cardiac Surgery

Start date: September 2017
Phase: Phase 4
Study type: Interventional

This is a randomized clinical trial in patients undergoing robotic myocardial revascularization with intraoperative extubation. Patients will be randomized into placebo or intrathecal morphine groups to assess postoperative pain scores and patient satisfaction. Patients will also be assessed for side effects from the intervention.

NCT ID: NCT03228628 Not yet recruiting - Pain Clinical Trials

Nitrous Oxide for Lumbar Puncture

NO for LP
Start date: October 1, 2017
Phase: Phase 4
Study type: Interventional

Lumbar puncture (LP) is a frequent exam that can cause pain and anxiety. In a pilot single-center study, it has been shown that nitrous oxide use during the procedure was able to reduce both pain and anxiety (Moisset et al., Eur J Neurol 2017). The goal of this multi-center trial is to confirm these results in a larger and more heterogeneous group of patients having a LP.

NCT ID: NCT03223246 Not yet recruiting - Pain Clinical Trials

Medication Education for Dosing Safety

MEDS
Start date: August 1, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Acetaminophen and ibuprofen are two of the most commonly used medication products among children <12 years old, and these medications are frequently prescribed for patients leaving the emergency department (ED), but previous studies have shown that parents often leave the ED unsure of how to safely dose these medications at home. This study will be a randomized controlled trial of a brief medication safety intervention, and examining parental knowledge and implementation of appropriate weight-based dosing.

NCT ID: NCT03221439 Not yet recruiting - Pain Clinical Trials

Cognitive Functional Therapy for Chronic Low Back Pain

Start date: August 1, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

There is evidence, of a single randomized controlled trial, that CFT is better than combined manual therapy and motor control exercise for chronic low back pain. However, this study had significant methodological shortcomings regarding the failure to carry out the intention to treat analysis and a considerable loss of follow-up of patients. It is important to replicate this study through a randomized clinical trial with similar objectives in another domain, but correcting these methodological shortcomings. Therefore, the aim of the study is to assess the efficacy of Cognitive Functional Therapy in patients with chronic non specific low back pain.

NCT ID: NCT03219086 Not yet recruiting - Pain Clinical Trials

Spinal Prilocaine for Caesarian Sections

Start date: August 1, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Prilocaine theoretically could provide faster onset because of its lower pKa (7,7) compared to bupivacaine (8,1). The primary objective of this prospective double blind randomized trial is to determine block onset of spinal hyperbaric prilocaine compared to bupivacaine, both with a small dose of sufentanyl as an additive.The primary hypothesis is that a significant larger amount of patients will gain surgical readiness within 8 minutes after spinal injection of prilocaine with sufentanyl compared to bupivacaine with sufentanyl. Surgical readiness is defined as a sensory block level of T5 tested by loss of cold sensation.

NCT ID: NCT03218306 Not yet recruiting - Pain Clinical Trials

Surgical Pleth Index (SPI) Versus Standard Clinical Approach Analgesia

SPIDER
Start date: October 1, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The study is aimed at confronting a surgical pleth index based protocol for intraoperative analgesia in a desflurane based general anesthesia for thyroidectomy, versus a standard clinical approach. A reduction in analgesic consumption and improvement in hemodynamics are expected.

NCT ID: NCT03216707 Not yet recruiting - Pain Clinical Trials

High Definition Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Motor Cortex Versus Insula

Start date: July 15, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Brain stimulation is a technique that can alter cortical function and thus be suitable for treating pain. This is especially when pain is chronic and associated with functional and even structural reorganization of the central nervous system. The idea of using invasive and noninvasive brain stimulation for pain relief is not new. Studies from the 1950s have investigated the brain stimulation for therapeutic use. Direct implantation of electrodes on the cerebral cortex has been carried out by Tsubokawa and colleagues in Japan. Although reported to be effective, it is invasive and involves the implantation of a foreign body into the cranium. Recent advancements in the techniques of non-invasive brain stimulation have improved and have measurable modulatory effects making this an attractive alternative for treating pain

NCT ID: NCT03216629 Not yet recruiting - Pain Clinical Trials

Sorry Not Sorry: Apologizing and Its Effect on Discomfort During Dressing Removal

Start date: August 1, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Use of dressing is common place following surgery, allowing for wounds to be covered and protected. Dressing material with adhesive contact layers or adhesive tape is integral to sealing off the wound. Mechanical stripping of stratum corneum during dressing removal causes pain and discomfort. During dressing removal, practitioners may at times apologize as a function of empathy. Previous study investigated speed of dressing removal and its effect on discomfort during dressing change. In this study, we aim to investigate how empathy expressed in form of saying "sorry" affect the perception of pain during dressing change?

NCT ID: NCT03207360 Not yet recruiting - Pain Clinical Trials

Pain Coping Skills and Meaning-Centered Intervention

Start date: August 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The proposed study seeks to develop and test a novel psychosocial pain management intervention for patients with advanced cancer. It is hypothesized that the intervention will demonstrate feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy. The first aim is to develop a combined pain coping skills training and meaning-centered psychotherapy intervention. The second aim is to test the intervention's feasibility and acceptability as well as preliminary efficacy for improving primary outcomes (i.e., pain, pain interference, and meaning in life) and secondary outcomes. Two efficacious, theory-driven interventions will be integrated to address pain management by teaching pain coping skills with a novel emphasis on enhancing a sense of meaning in life. Participants will be patients with advanced cancer and moderate-to-severe pain. The study will be conducted in two phases. Phase I of the study will be intervention development. The intervention content will be guided by theory and mentoring from a team of leading experts in pain management and meaning-centered psychotherapy. Initial intervention content will be further informed by interviews with patients with advanced cancer. Content will then be refined through an iterative patient testing process. Phase II of the study will be a single-arm pilot trial testing the intervention. The intervention will be delivered in-person and consist of four, 45-to-60 minute therapy sessions. Study measures will be collected at baseline (0 weeks), immediately post-intervention (5 weeks), and 4-weeks post-intervention (9 weeks).

NCT ID: NCT03205579 Not yet recruiting - Pain Clinical Trials

Pain Education to Improve Cancer Pain Management Patients: A Randomized Trial

Start date: July 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Cancer pain is one of the problems of treating cancer pain. Although, there is a WHO analgesic ladder to improve this problem, it is still inadequate pain control. Pain does not affect only physical but also emotional and quality of life. From review literatures we found that patients' knowledge about cancer pain management is inaccurate; for example, fear to use opioid, try to patience of pain, concerning only cancer treatments, which can cause of unfavorable pain management outcome. Therefore, we will conduct the RCT of using pain education by video comparing to conventional face to face pain education by nurse in hospitalized cancer pain patients.We will use 25 MCQs examination for testing pre-post intervention to test level of understanding of patients. The measurements are NRS, ThaiHADs and FACT-G at the first and last day of study. We expect that NRS should improve more than 50% at the seven day of study.