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NCT ID: NCT03579446 Not yet recruiting - Pain Clinical Trials

Levorphanol as A Second Line Opioid in Reducing Pain in Participants With Cancer

Start date: September 7, 2018
Phase: Early Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This early phase I trial studies how well levorphanol works as a second line opioid in reducing pain in participants with cancer that may have spread to other places in the body. Levorphanol may work better in controlling cancer pain.

NCT ID: NCT03562793 Not yet recruiting - Pain Clinical Trials

Communication and Activation in Pain to Enhance Relationships and Treat Pain With Equity

COOPERATE
Start date: August 1, 2018
Phase: Early Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

Chronic pain affects approximately 100 million Americans and 40-70% of Veterans, and amounts to over $600 billion/year in direct medical costs and lost worker productivity. Racial disparities in pain care are well-documented, within and outside VA. Minorities are more likely to be undertreated for pain, are subjected to more urine drug tests, and are referred for substance abuse evaluation more frequently than Whites. Minority patients also exhibit lower levels of engagement and active involvement in their healthcare, which leads to poorer communication with providers and poorer outcomes. COOPERATE is a randomized controlled trial testing an intervention to improve minority Veterans' active participation in their pain care by focusing on 2 essential skill sets: 1) goal-setting and prioritization, and 2) communication skills.

NCT ID: NCT03562481 Not yet recruiting - Pain Clinical Trials

Clinical Trial Comparing Effectiveness of Buffered Versus Unbuffered Local Anesthetic in Children Ages 10-12 Years

Start date: June 2018
Phase: Phase 4
Study type: Interventional

Local anesthesia is an integral part of clinical pediatric dental practice, but it has challenges. It can be uncomfortable for children, and the risk of adverse events limits how much is used. Some evidence suggests benefits of buffering local anesthetics including equal effect with less pain on injection. These findings have not been replicated and validated among pediatric populations, creating a gap in the knowledge base. To address this knowledge gap and contribute to the evidence base on safety and efficacy of local anesthesia in pediatric dentistry, this investigation proposes to compare the anesthetic effects of buffered 1% lidocaine with those of unbuffered 2%, among children. The specific aims of this investigation are to determine differences between buffered 1% and unbuffered 2% lidocaine (both with 1:100,000 epinephrine) used for inferior alveolar nerve block (IAN) anesthesia, in the following domains: 1. Pain experience on injection, time to onset following the administration, and time to recovery [subjective] 2. Blood lidocaine levels 15 minutes following the administration and duration of pulpal anesthesia [objective] Null Hypotheses: 1. No difference exists in anesthetic effectiveness for pulpal anesthesia after intraoral IAN block between buffered 1% Lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine as compared to unbuffered 2% Lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine. 2. No differences exist in peak blood lidocaine levels, pain on injection, time to lip numbness, and duration of anesthesia between the two drug formulations. Randomized subjects will be injected orally for bottom jaw anesthesia, with 3cc of buffered 1% lidocaine (30mg) 1:100,000 epinephrine or 3cc unbuffered of 2% lidocaine (60mg) 1:100,000 epinephrine. The injectable volume of the buffered formulation will include 0.3cc of 8.4% sodium bicarbonate. One faculty member in the Department of Pediatric Dentistry at the University of North Carolina (UNC) School of Dentistry will administer the drugs in the Pediatric Dentistry clinic. The same clinician will administer injection to the same subjects at both visits. Clinicians and subjects will not know which drug formulation is given at which appointment. A clinician will measure the level of discomfort on injection, how long it takes for the lip to be numb, how long it takes for the first molar tooth in that area to be numb, how long it takes the local anesthetic to wear off, and how much of the anesthetic is in the blood.

NCT ID: NCT03553576 Not yet recruiting - Pain Clinical Trials

Drug Concentration and Volume on Adequate Labor Analgesia With PIEB

CADD2
Start date: September 1, 2018
Phase: Phase 4
Study type: Interventional

Neuraxial labor analgesia is performed by the administration of a local anesthetic/opioid mixture in the epidural space. The delivery method is a combination of continuous infusion, provider-administered boluses and patient-administered boluses (patient controlled epidural analgesia [PCEA]) via epidural catheter. Pain during the first stage of labor is primarily due to lower uterine segment and cervical stretching. The pain signals enter the spinal cord through sensory nerves at the T10 through L1 dermatomes. Pain signals from the late first state and second stage of labor also arise from the vagina and perineum. These signals travel with the pudendal nerve and enter the spinal cord at S2-S4. Thus, the anesthetic solution administered through the lumbar epidural catheter must spread cephalad in the epidural space to reach the T10 nerve roots and spinal cord, and must spread caudad to reach the caudal nerve roots in the epidural space. The optimal method for maintaining labor analgesia is unknown. Several studies have demonstrated that PIEB, in combination with PCEA, provide superior maintenance of labor analgesia (less need and longer time to provider intervention, lower local anesthetic consumption, less motor block, and improved patient satisfaction scores) than maintenance with a continuous infusion with PCEA.The mechanism for this difference is not known; however, one suggested mechanism is improved spread of the local anesthetic within the epidural space. Kaynar et al. injected methylene blue dye through a multi-orifice catheter using either a continuous infusion or intermittent bolus and the area of diffusion was measured on a piece of paper. The authors found that intermittent boluses were associated with a greater surface area of diffusion than continuous infusion. In a cadaver study, dye was injected into the lumbar epidural space, and cryomicrotome sections were taken.Dye flowed in rivulets through small channels in the epidural space, as opposed to moving as a unified front. The authors found dye injected at high pressures had more uniform spread through the epidural space, supporting the concept of intermittent epidural injection providing superior analgesia. Epidural infusion pumps capable of delivering PIEB of local anesthetic with PCEA have become commercially available and many studies have attempted to assess the optimal parameter settings (including volume of programmed bolus, bolus interval, rate of bolus administration) to provide superior labor analgesia. Recently we completed a double-blinded randomized control trial evaluating two bolus delivery rates, hypothesizing that those patients randomized to receive higher bolus delivery rates would have improved labor analgesia. However, no difference was found between groups.What is more, both groups had a mean cephalad sensory level to cold of T6. This sensory level is higher than the traditional goal of T10 (upper dermatome level of uterine innervation), but despite the adequate sensory level, a large number of patients required supplemental physician-delivered boluses of local anesthetic during labor. Forty percent of the women in the high-rate group and 36% of the low-rate group required a manual re-dose during labor. This suggests that either a higher volume, or higher concentration of local anesthetic (i.e., higher dose) is needed to maintain adequate labor analgesia. Traditionally higher concentration local anesthetic solutions have been associated with increased motor blockade leading to a higher incidence of instrumental vaginal delivery. Several local anesthetic solutions with varying drug concentrations are available for labor analgesia and are used clinically in the United States. We plan to perform a randomized, controlled, double-blind study to test the hypothesis that patients whose labor analgesia is maintained using PIEB with low-volume bolus (6.25 mL) of a higher local anesthetic concentration solution (0.1% bupivacaine with fentanyl 1.95 mcg/mL) will require less supplemental analgesia (manual provider re-doses) than patients whose PIEB is delivered with a high-volume bolus (10 mL) of lower density local anesthetic solution (0.0625% bupivacaine with fentanyl 1.95 mcg/mL). The aim of this study is to evaluate the association between bolus volume and concentration of local anesthetic during maintenance of labor analgesia with programmed intermittent epidural bolus (PIEB) analgesia. The hypothesis of this study is: patients whose labor analgesia is maintained using PIEB with low-volume bolus (6.25 mL) of higher local anesthetic concentration solution (0.1% bupivacaine with fentanyl 1.95 mcg/mL) will have a longer duration of adequate analgesia (time to first manual re-dose request) than patients whose PIEB is delivered with a high-volume bolus (10 mL) of lower concentration local anesthetic solution (0.0625% bupivacaine with fentanyl 1.95 mcg/mL).

NCT ID: NCT03529331 Not yet recruiting - Pain Clinical Trials

A Study Comparing Recurrent Use of MSIR, Percocet, and Vicodin at Discharge From the ED

Start date: July 1, 2018
Phase: Phase 4
Study type: Interventional

This is a prospective randomized, clinical trial comparing recurrent use of Morphine Sulfate Immediate Release (MSIR), Oxycodone/Acetaminophen (Percocet), and Hydrocodone/Acetaminophen (Vicodin) at discharge from the emergency department for opioid-naive adult patients presenting with moderate-to-severe pain. At discharge, patients will be randomized to receive either 5 mg of Oxycodone/Acetaminophen (Percocet) tablet 4 times a day for 5 days, 5 mg of Hydrocodone/Acetaminophen (Vicodin) tablet 4 times a day for 5 days, or 15 mg Morphine Sulfate Immediate Release (MSIR) tablet 4 times a day for 5 days. At 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months patients' prescription's history will be accessed by using the DoctorFirst Drug Database to determine the recurrent use that will serve as a surrogate marker of likeability and abuse liability of each prescribed opioid.

NCT ID: NCT03528369 Not yet recruiting - Pain Clinical Trials

A Phase 2 Clinical Trial to Examine the Comparative Effects on Osteoarthritic Knee Pain of CGS-200-1, CGS-200-5, and CGS-200-0

Start date: May 14, 2018
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This is a multi-center, randomized, double-blind clinical trial to examine the comparative effects on OAKP of CGS-200-1 (1% Capsaicin content) (N=40), CGS-200-5 (5% Capsaicin content) (N=40), and CGS-200 Vehicle (no Capsaicin) (N=40) in subjects with OA of the knees according to the 1986 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria. Assigned doses will be applied at the clinic for 60 minutes on each of four consecutive days. Subjects will be randomized to one of the three Arms in this study: CGS-200-1 or CGS-200-5 or CGS-200 Vehicle (CGS-200-0). All subjects will receive 4 consecutive days of treatment and will then be followed up until the Day 94 visit. Even though both knee(s) will receive application of study test materials, with regard to reduction in WOMAC pain and VAS pain score associated with study treatments, only one knee will be indicated as the "Study Knee". This will be the knee with the highest WOMAC pain score at screening. If both knees have equal WOMAC pain scores at baseline, then the right knee will be considered the "Study Knee" with regard to WOMAC pain and VAS pain score reduction. Data will be collected from Day 1 through Day 5 and then again on Days 19, 35, 64 and 94 for efficacy, tolerability, and safety measures. The Investigators, all site staff and Clinical Research Organization (CRO) personnel (except the Medical Monitor providing safety oversight) directly involved in the study will remain blinded to the treatment assignment throughout the trial.

NCT ID: NCT03498820 Not yet recruiting - Pain Clinical Trials

Analgesia-Nociception Index Guided Intraoperative Remifentanil Administration Versus Standard Practice:Evaluation of Perioperative Opioid Use

MONIDOL-ANI
Start date: May 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This study compares two groups of patients undergoing a gynecological surgey under general anesthesia: one group in which intraoperative analgesia is guided by the Analgesia-nociception index, and another group in which intraoperative analgesia is managed as in standard practice. The objective is to assess if the Analgesia Nociception Index may result in a decrease in total analgesic drugs consumption, a decrease in post-operative pain and in chronic pain development.

NCT ID: NCT03497039 Not yet recruiting - Pain Clinical Trials

A Study to Characterize Diclofenac's Plasma and Knee Exposure After Application of Diclofenac Gel to the Knee of Subjects With Osteoarthritis That Have a Scheduled Arthroplasty

Start date: July 10, 2018
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the exposure of diclofenac in the plasma and in the knee joint following topical administration of DDEA gel 4 gram (g) applied twice daily for 7 days

NCT ID: NCT03495531 Not yet recruiting - Pain Clinical Trials

Virtual Reality in Obstetric Patients

Start date: May 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of this study is to determine if non-invasive distracting devices (Virtual Reality headset) are more effective than the standard of care (i.e., no technology based distraction) for preventing anxiety and pain scores in women who are undergoing child laboring procedures. The anticipated primary outcome will be a reduction of pregnant females overall anxiety and pain scores before and after such procedure(s), including but not limited to epidural/combined spinal epidural (CSE), IV placement and/or labor.

NCT ID: NCT03481166 Not yet recruiting - Pain Clinical Trials

Women Empowered Through Education to Breastfeed

Start date: May 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The experience of breastfeeding-related pain is common for postpartum women, but is not often anticipated as part of the postpartum experience. This feasibility randomized controlled trial aims to examine the effectiveness of a nurse-led educational intervention using anticipatory guidance among pregnant women wishing to breastfeed on breastfeeding outcomes, breastfeeding-related pain, and maternal satisfaction.