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NCT ID: NCT02844348 Withdrawn - Pain Clinical Trials

Impact of Hypnosis on Pain Management During Dialysis on Patients Suffering From Arterial Disease

HYPNODIAL
Start date: February 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

A chronic renal disease can results in the development of cardiovascular complications, including chronic arterial disease ; but a cardiovascular disease may be from a kidney malfunction that will end in end stage renal disease (ESRD). Two thirds of the chronic hemodialysis patients taken in charge in Grenoble in the last years suffered from an arterial disease at a symptomatic stage. Breakthrough pain can appear during the hemodialysis sessions. These sessions induce sudden hemodynamic changes and a peripheral vasoconstriction reaction that increases in particular all pain phenomena related to chronic low limbs ischemia. Therefore, patients have to face pain, sometimes chronic but also breakthrough pain, during the dialysis sessions, in all its dimensions. The analgesic balance through the classical drug treatment is extremely complex, as they are both at risk of overdose and of partial effectiveness. Strict medical treatment remains unsatisfactory, as it takes into account only the expressions of symptoms during dialysis sessions, when most of the time pain is already installed and analgesic treatment is not completely effective. The combination of classic pharmacological treatment with hypnosis, already used in other indications (chronic pain, analgesia, depression and anxiety), may mitigate the painful feeling on patients suffering from arterial disease during the dialysis sessions, with a beneficial impact on their overall quality of life. There is also evidence to suggest that hypnosis may be more effective treating neuropathic or vascular pain, those experienced by our patients, than musculoskeletal pain, like back pain. Hypnosis is a mind-body approach focused on the subject, and not on the disease or the act of dialysis. It can be described at the same time as a modified state of consciousness and a particular intersubjective relation between a practitioner and his patient. The practice of this kind of hypnoanalgesia by the nurses is particularly relevant in hemodialysis, as the trust developed during regular chronic treatment can become an asset to shorten the induction phase and help to install this intersubjective relation. The high incidence of this complication, the difficulties of current pain management and the impact on everyday life for the patients, justify the choice of this approach, where more further research is needed.

NCT ID: NCT02828059 Withdrawn - Pain Clinical Trials

Continuous Wound Infiltration for Diminution of Post-surgery Pain After Caesarean Section

dip-Caesar
Start date: August 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

A medical approach that warrants continuous and reliable local administration of non-opioid analgesic drugs might substantially improve post-surgery pain management in CS, while decreasing the necessity of staff-dependent invasive procedures and the probability of untoward effects following systemic drug exposure. ReadyfusOR® is a formulation comprising a Ropivacain-loaded single-use pump which has been approved for regional application of the analgesic drug, also comprising obstetric interventions. There is, however, scarce scientific information on the efficacy and benefit of this anesthetic drug formulation for pain management following CS by means of continuous wound infiltration.

NCT ID: NCT02815111 Withdrawn - Pain Clinical Trials

Evaluation of Ketamine and Multi-modal Analgesics

Start date: July 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

The purpose of this research study is to see if pain can be better controlled with fewer side effects. The new drug regimen will study several different medicines that have different ways of treating pain.

NCT ID: NCT02542098 Withdrawn - Pain Clinical Trials

Safety, Pharmacokinetics (PK), and Effectiveness of Hydrocodone Bitartrate (HYD) Extended-Release Tablets in Children

Start date: January 2017
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety, pharmacokinetics (PK), and effectiveness of Hydrocodone Bitartrate (HYD) tablets in children with moderate to severe pain requiring around-the-clock opioid analgesics.

NCT ID: NCT02521480 Withdrawn - Pain Clinical Trials

Determination of Analgesic Effect From One Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation(TMS)Treatment Following Vaginal Reconstructive Surgery.

TMS
Start date: July 2015
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

To determine whether real TMS is more effective than sham TMS in reducing pain following surgery

NCT ID: NCT02390440 Withdrawn - Pain Clinical Trials

Exparel for Pain Control During Care of Rib Fractures

Start date: April 2015
Phase: Phase 4
Study type: Interventional

This study is looking at a novel therapy of numbing medication injected directly around the fracture site. The purpose of this study is to determine if the study medication, EXPAREL®, is a viable alternative to current therapies for rib fractures.

NCT ID: NCT02378740 Withdrawn - Pain Clinical Trials

Ketamine in Patients Undergoing Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion

Start date: April 2015
Phase: Phase 4
Study type: Interventional

Ketamine is an IV anesthetic with non-opioid analgesic properties that has been shown to reduce pain while also decreasing intraoperative and postoperative opioid requirements when used in subanesthetic doses after a variety of surgical procedures.1 It is a non-competitive antagonist of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, and by this mechanism ketamine is believed to block the development of central sensitization and wind-up phenomenon,2,3 which may be helpful in preventing acute and chronic pain after repetitive insults. In a systematic review of ketamine as an adjuvant to opioid analgesia, low-dose ketamine was found to be a useful addition to standard postoperative pain management practice with opioids in 54% of studies.1 The studies that did not show a significant effect were in patient populations with low opioid requirements. Therefore, it has been suggested that future clinical trials be focused on patient populations with significant post-operative pain, such as spine surgery and major orthopedic surgery not amenable to regional analgesia, and postoperative pain in patients on chronic preoperative opioid therapy.1 There are few studies examining outcomes after ketamine in the perioperative period after spine surgery. Loftus et al randomized patients with a history of chronic preoperative opioid use (i.e., daily opiate use for at least 6 weeks) to intraoperative ketamine versus placebo and found a 30% reduction in morphine consumption at 48 hours and an approximately 25% reduction in visual analog scale (VAS) pain score in the post anesthesia care unit and at 6 weeks.4 Although this study provided evidence that there may be reduction in long-term postoperative pain, additional studies are needed to provide evidence that this effect is sustained beyond the 6-week period. We are interested in examining ketamine more closely in spine surgery because this patient population experiences significant postoperative pain that may be difficult to control due to preoperative opioid use (i.e., opioid tolerance). The investigators chose to study ACDF patients specifically because it is a common spine procedure throughout the United States and the patients have significant opioid requirements postoperatively. In a study examining the effects of the low dose ketamine for postoperative IV PCA fentanyl after cervical and lumbar surgery, patients in the placebo group (and thus only receiving fentanyl PCA) reported mean VAS scores of 4-5 with movement while receiving opioids.5 Further, while previous studies have shown an opioid-sparing effect of ketamine as measured by opioid consumption and a decrease in pain as measured by VAS scores, no study to our knowledge has examined quality of recovery after intraoperative ketamine infusion. The Quality of recovery (QoR-40) score was developed by Myles et al to assess quality of recovery after anesthesia based on forty questions in five dimensions,6 and this score has been shown to be a reliable and valid outcome for patients undergoing both spine and cranial surgery.7 QoR-40 is also of interest because it should be able to provide a global assessment of the possible benefit or harm of using ketamine in patients by simultaneously characterizing the detrimental side effects as well as the positive benefits of ketamine when used as an infusion at subanesthetic levels (studies thus far have shown that there are minimal side effects such as hallucinations).1,4 Significance: Previous studies have shown an opioid-sparing effect of ketamine, however further research is warranted in patients whose pain may be difficult to control and whether this effect is sustained. ACDF patients experience significant pain post-operatively, and ketamine may improve their quality of recovery due to its opioid-sparing effects and prevention of chronic pain. Further, patient centered outcomes as measured by the QoR-40 have not been reported in the literature when ketamine, or other opioid sparing anesthetics, have been administered. This study will not only determine if the "moderate" dose of ketamine is beneficial or detrimental to the recovery of patients but also whether it can improve long term patient function, presumably by decreasing central pain sensitization. In addition, this study will set the stage for further RCT's examining other analgesic strategies in cervical spine surgery patients (i.e., intraoperative lidocaine infusions, volatile anesthetic vs. propofol as the primary hypnotic, COX-2 inhibitors, pregabalin, etc.). The overall goal would be to develop a multi-faceted regimen that decreases the postoperative inpatient opioid requirements of these patients and may facilitate long term recovery. The research questions:Does ketamine improve the quality of recovery at 24 hours after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF)? The hypothesis: the investigators hypothesize that ketamine will improve the quality of recovery after ACDF surgery

NCT ID: NCT02336308 Withdrawn - Pain Clinical Trials

A Randomized, Double-Blind Study of Placebo vs. Ketamine For Use During Dressing Changes in Critically Ill Burn Patients

Start date: January 2015
Phase: Phase 4
Study type: Interventional

Burn-related pain is severe and often difficult to manage. Healthcare workers struggle with keeping burn patients comfortable, especially when these patients undergo dressing changes of their burn wounds of their skin since these procedures often cause severe pain. Patients with burn wounds frequently require high doses of opioids (narcotics) and calming (anxiolytic) agents to the extent that clinicians must weigh the risks associated with these doses against achieving adequate analgesia and comfort. The biggest risk is over-sedation to cause breathing troubles. Inadequate pain control during these procedures heightens pain perception, anxiety, and fear surrounding the experience and may lead to patients experiencing additional psychological disorders like depression, acute stress disorder (ASD), and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Therefore, therapeutic options for better management of pain and anxiety during these procedures need to be identified. This study will address whether the addition of ketamine during dressing changes improves patients' pain control and comfort and whether this leads to favorable psychological outcomes. The study is designed to compare ketamine with placebo when they are added to usual care (opioids and anxiolytics) during dressing changes. The main outcomes of the study will be the amount of opioid and anxiolytic agents each group receives during their procedure; the presence of pain-related anxiety shortly after the procedures; blood markers of stress during the procedures; and the presence of depression, anxiety and stress disorders prior to discharge. This study will assess whether the early administration of ketamine reduces pain and anxiety to prevent the need for high doses of opioids and anxiolytics. A total of 30 patients will be enrolled.

NCT ID: NCT02240602 Withdrawn - Pain Clinical Trials

Optimal Dose of i.v Oxycodone for Postoperative Pain After Laparoscopic Colorectal Surgery

Start date: July 2015
Phase: Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

Postoperative pain control is required after major abdominal surgery, including laparoscopic colorectal surgery. Intravenous oxycodone is widely used for postoperative acute pain control mainly in Europe. The aim of this study is to evaluate the optimal dose of intravenous oxycodone for pain control after laparoscopic colorectal surgery in Korean.

NCT ID: NCT02230735 Withdrawn - Pain Clinical Trials

Bupivacaine Injections Into Uterosacral Ligaments During Robotic Assisted Total Hysterectomies

Start date: August 2014
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Will patients that receive injections of Marcaine into the uterine nerve via the uterosacral ligaments experience less pain postoperatively, need less narcotic pain medication and return to activities of daily living sooner.