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Obesity, Morbid clinical trials

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NCT ID: NCT04844320 Active, not recruiting - Back Pain Clinical Trials

THE EFFECT OF FAST WEIGHT EFFICIENCY AFTER LAPAROSCOPIC SLEEVE GASTRECTOMY ON THE COBB ANGLE IN MORBID OBESE PATIENTS

Start date: April 1, 2021
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Obesity has become an increasingly common health problem today. In this context, although many anatomical, physiological and metabolic problems arising from obesity in morbid obese patients are tried to be solved in daily practice, it has been proven that eliminating obesity is sufficient in the treatment of many diseases. When we look at the literature, it is known that morbid obesity causes deformation and excessive wear in most body joints. When morbid obesity disappears, it has been shown that the previously existing neck, waist, back and knee pains regress. The aim of this study is to reveal the Cobb angle change in morbidly obese patients who achieved rapid weight loss after obesity surgery; To investigate the effect of weight loss on vertebral anatomy.

NCT ID: NCT04841057 Not yet recruiting - Metabolic Syndrome Clinical Trials

Biometabolic Outcomes After Weight Loss Surgery: An Individualized Approach

Start date: July 1, 2021
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Variable outcomes after weight loss surgery are likely attributable to complex, poorly understood mechanisms. Due to the significant impact that morbid obesity has on a patient's health, successful management of obesity and its related comorbid medical conditions is important and thus necessitates continued improved therapies for treating obesity. Although the mechanisms of weight loss after surgical intervention are poorly understood, improved understanding of molecular and metabolic changes that occur after weight loss surgery may offer the ability to provide targeted precision therapy for patients with morbid obesity undergoing surgical therapy. In this proposal, we will combine a clinical trial whereby modifications to the gold-standard for weight loss surgery, the gastric bypass, are evaluated while simultaneously measuring molecular and metabolic changes that occur in response to these weight loss procedures. Through creating variable lengths of bypass intestine after gastric bypass, we will be able to determine the effect of malabsorption on clinical outcomes and mechanisms involved in weight loss after gastric bypass. We will also use two control groups. One will be a surgical weight loss control group and consist of patients undergoing a laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy, a non-intestinal bypass procedure. The other group will consist of patients having non-surgical weight loss therapy. To asses metabolic changes that occur in response to surgical weight therapy and specifically intestinal bypass and malabsorption, we will examine changes in the gut microbiome and plasma gut enteroendocrine hormones. To evaluate molecular pathways that are impacted as a result of gastric bypass and malabsorption, we will measure circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) in the blood. Measurement of miRNAs will provide data on an easily measurable molecular marker for each treatment group. This is a first step in translational exploration of mechanisms of weight loss after surgery by evaluating both clinical and molecular/metabolic outcomes and begin an explorative process towards creating an individualized approach to improving outcomes after weight loss surgery.

NCT ID: NCT04836819 Recruiting - Pain Clinical Trials

Analgesia Management in Bariatric Surgery

Start date: April 8, 2021
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Following laparoscopic bariatric surgery, multimodal analgesia is recommended to avoid the adverse effects of opioids by reducing their use. Although lidocaine, ketamine, and dexmedetomidine have been used as adjuvant analgesics, no studies have evaluated the superiority of their intra- and postoperative infusions as components of multimodal analgesia in bariatric surgery. The present study is aimed to compare lidocaine, dexmedetomidine, and ketamine in multimodal analgesia management following Sleeve Gastrectomy Surgery. Postoperative pain scores, the requirement for additional postoperative analgesia, retching, nausea and vomiting, time to mobilization, and hospital length of stay will be evaluated.

NCT ID: NCT04836598 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Cholecystitis, Chronic

Bikini Scarless Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy for Morbid Obesity as a Day Case.

Start date: November 30, 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Background: Bikini line laparoscopic cholecystectomy is a safe method, used as a scarless cosmetic port technique for gall bladder diseases in morbid obese patients as a day case. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the safety and efficacy of an elective Bikini line laparoscopic cholecystectomy in the morbid obese patients with chronic calcular cholecystitis, and review our experience with Bikini line laparoscopic cholecystectomy as minimal invasive scarless technique. We issued a modifications in order to minimize the number of ports (Brief ports) and modify port sites, using the Bikini line laparoscopic cholecystectomy as a cosmetic and hidden scar laparoscopy for obese patients concerned with aesthetic results and body image. Aiming at faster recovery, decrease pain and improve cosmoses. Bikini Line laparoscopic cholecystectomy is technically safe and effective day surgery procedure for chronic cholecystitis patients with higher patient satisfaction regarding pain and cosmoses. Obesity, intended as BMI 40, does not have any obstacle on the technical feasibility of BLLC.

NCT ID: NCT04834635 Recruiting - Obesity, Morbid Clinical Trials

The FundoRingOAGB Versus Non-wrapping (Non-banded) Standard Method of Laparoscopic One Anastomosis Gastric Bypass

FundoRingMGB
Start date: March 29, 2021
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Currently, one anastomosis gastric bypass (OAGB) or mini-gastric bypass (MGB) is a common bariatric procedure for treating obesity. Weight gain after surgery is a big problem in bariatric practice. Therefore, adjustable bands and rings are used, for example, "FobiRing". But foreign material can cause complications - the erosion of the stomach wall. For this reason, surgeons avoid the use of various mechanical devices on living tissues. The greatest criticism is of the OAGB for the likelihood of biliary reflux. In case of reflux of bile into the esophagus after surgery, as a rule, a second operation is required with conversion OAGB to the Roux-en-Y method. In addition, along with obesity, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are steadily increasing world weight and antireflux surgery must be performed simultaneously with bariatric surgery in obese patients. In these cases, most often in bariatric practice, hiatus cruroraphy is performed, and less often fundoplication using the fundus of the excluded part of the stomach. We hypothesize that total fundoplication can not only treat GERD but also significant prevent the return of weight like after a banded gastric bypass and prevent postoperative bile reflux in the esophagus. The aim study is to compare primary outcome as weight loss after total wrapping of the fundus of the gastric excluded part (FundoRing) and non - wrapping (non - banded) standard method of laparoscopic one anastomosis gastric bypass and measure secondary outcome: bile reflux in the esophagus and GERD symptoms. Methods: Adult participants (n=100) are randomly allocated to one of two groups: Experimental surgical bariatric procedure in the first (A) group: patients (n=50) undergo the laparoscopic one anastomosis gastric bypass with the total wrapping of the fundus of gastric excluded part and suture cruroplasty if present hiatal hernia (FundoRingOAGB group); Active comparator surgical bariatric procedure in the second (B) group: patients (n=50) undergo the laparoscopic one anastomosis gastric bypass and with only suture cruroplasty if present hiatal hernia (OAGB group).

NCT ID: NCT04826055 Active, not recruiting - Obesity, Morbid Clinical Trials

Biliary Limb as a Percentage From the Small Intestine Rather Than Fixed Length in Loop Bypass Surgery for Morbid Obesity

Start date: March 25, 2021
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

in all loop bypass bariatric procedure (mini gastric bypass & single anastomosis sleeve jejunal bypass), biliary limb is fixed length. we do it as a percentage from total small intestine length rather than fixed length

NCT ID: NCT04823767 Completed - Obesity, Morbid Clinical Trials

Single Anastomosis Sleeve Iejenal Bypass in Obese Patient With Hiatus Hernia

Start date: April 12, 2020
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

single anastomosis sleeve jejunal bypass with hiatal repair for morbid obesity with reflux manifestations

NCT ID: NCT04814147 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Obesity-Associated Insulin Resistance

Role NLRP3 Inflammasome in Weight Loss Following Sleeve Gastrectomy in Morbidly Obese Patients

BARIAMITRI
Start date: March 16, 2021
Phase:
Study type: Observational

Epidemiological studies show a very rapid increase in the epidemic of obesity in the Caribbean population. 6 out of 10 adults are overweight and 1 out of 4 is obese. Most are women. Consequences : harm to health and possible reduction in life expectancy due to the association with many cardiovascular comorbidities. Adverse effects of obesity on the cardiovascular and endocrine systems are attributed a chronic low-grade inflammatory state in obese patients. Visceral adipose tissue is largely responsible for the inflammatory syndrome. Obesity can also induce the formation of multi-protein platforms called inflammasomes also activated by mitochondrial production. Morbid obesity treatment with sleeve gastrectomy is an effective long term therapeutic for weight loss but also beneficial in terms of insulin resistance and cardiovascular complications. Some patients nevertheless remain resistant to the beneficial cardio-metabolic effects of bariatric surgery. However, the mechanisms that regulate the extent of weight loss and its stabilization after bariatric surgery are still poorly understood. Our study aims to describe the evolution of postoperative weight loss and the place of preoperative inflammation in its amplitude. The hypothesis is that the level of inflammation in visceral fat before surgery determines the extent of postoperative weight loss in obese women who have undergone sleeve gastrectomy.

NCT ID: NCT04807959 Completed - Obesity Clinical Trials

Evaluation of the Effectiveness of a Comprehensive Visceral Adiposity-Focused Anti-Obesity Program

Start date: October 27, 2016
Phase:
Study type: Observational

A retrospective review of body composition outcomes of participants of a comprehensive visceral-fat focused anti-obesity program. Data from approximately 2000-2500 participants are expected to be included in the study.

NCT ID: NCT04805476 Completed - Clinical trials for Bariatric Surgery Candidate

Prophylactic Use of Noninvasive Ventilation in the Postoperative Period of Bariatric Surgery

Start date: March 1, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Comorbidities associated with severe obesity determine an important public health problem. Few methods are considered potentially effective for the treatment of severe obesity and the clinical relevance of bariatric surgery is growing, as well as the number of procedures performed. The insertion of the physiotherapist in the multiprofessional team responsible for performing the surgical procedure is essential from the preoperative screening and evaluation to the prevention and treatment of postoperative complications. Therefore, the physiopathological aspects involved with severe obesity, the technical aspects and risks of the surgical procedure, as well as the physiotherapeutic techniques that have scientific proof must be known by the physiotherapist responsible for the surgical follow-up of the patient. In this context, the use of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) in the postoperative period of bariatric surgery has ample therapeutic potential. The present research project aims to evaluate the immediate prophylactic use of NIV on the respiratory and functional recovery of the patients.