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Recurrent Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive clinical trials

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NCT ID: NCT03246906 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Comparison of Triple GVHD Prophylaxis Regimens for Nonmyeloablative or Reduced Intensity Conditioning Unrelated Mobilized Blood Cell Transplantation

Start date: October 15, 2017
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This randomized phase II trial includes a blood stem cell transplant from an unrelated donor to treat blood cancer. The treatment also includes chemotherapy drugs, but in lower doses than conventional (standard) stem cell transplants. The researchers will compare two different drug combinations used to reduce the risk of a common but serious complication called "graft versus host disease" (GVHD) following the transplant. Two drugs, cyclosporine (CSP) and sirolimus (SIR), will be combined with either mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) or post-transplant cyclophosphamide (PTCy). This part of the transplant procedure is the main research focus of the study.

NCT ID: NCT02730195 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive

Pioglitazone and Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor in Treating Patients With Relapsed Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

Start date: May 2016
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial studies how well pioglitazone hydrochloride and tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy works in treating patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) that has come back after a period of improvement (relapsed) after a first TKI discontinuation. TKI may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking certain enzymes need for cell growth. Although TKI therapies are effective against CML, there are residual cancer cells called leukemia stem cells that are able to hide from TKIs. Pioglitazone is a drug approved by the Food and Drug Administration to treat diabetes and has been shown in laboratory studies to increase CML stem cell death when given together with TKI therapy. Giving pioglitazone with TKI therapy may be effective in treating patients with CML.

NCT ID: NCT02728700 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Sirolimus and Mycophenolate Mofetil in Preventing GVHD in Patients With Hematologic Malignancies Undergoing HSCT

Start date: February 2016
Phase: Phase 1/Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This pilot phase I/II trial studies the side effects and how well sirolimus and mycophenolate mofetil work in preventing graft versus host disease (GvHD) in patients with hematologic malignancies undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). Biological therapies, such as sirolimus and mycophenolate mofetil, use substances made from living organisms that may stimulate or suppress the immune system in different ways and stop tumor cells from growing. Giving sirolimus and mycophenolate mofetil after hematopoietic stem cell transplant may be better in preventing graft-versus-host disease.

NCT ID: NCT02381548 Active, not recruiting - Clinical trials for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Phase I Trial of AZD1775 and Belinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Myeloid Malignancies or Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Start date: August 18, 2015
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of WEE1 inhibitor AZD1775 and belinostat when given together in treating patients with myeloid malignancies that have returned after a period of improvement or have not responded to previous treatment or patients with untreated acute myeloid leukemia. WEE1 inhibitor AZD1775 and belinostat may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

NCT ID: NCT02220985 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Selective Depletion of CD45RA+ T Cells From Allogeneic Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Grafts From HLA-Matched Related and Unrelated Donors in Preventing GVHD

Start date: February 3, 2015
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial studies how well selective T cell depletion works in preventing graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, or chronic myelogenous leukemia undergoing donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Removing a subset of the T cells from the donor cells before transplant may stop this from happening.

NCT ID: NCT01822509 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Myelodysplastic Syndrome

Ipilimumab or Nivolumab in Treating Patients With Relapsed Hematologic Malignancies After Donor Stem Cell Transplant

Start date: April 9, 2013
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This phase I/Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of ipilimumab or nivolumab in treating patients with cancers of the blood and blood-forming tissues (hematologic cancers) that have returned after a period of improvement (relapsed) after donor stem cell transplant. Monoclonal antibodies, such as ipilimumab and nivolumab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread.

NCT ID: NCT01527045 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Donor Atorvastatin Treatment in Preventing Severe Acute GVHD After Nonmyeloablative Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Patients With Hematological Malignancies

Start date: September 25, 2012
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial studies how well donor atorvastatin treatment works in preventing severe graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after nonmyeloablative peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) transplant in patients with hematological malignancies. Giving low doses of chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate, before a donor PBSC transplantation slows the growth of cancer cells and may also prevent the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. The donated stem cells may replace the patient's immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells (graft-versus-tumor effect). Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can also cause an immune response against the body's normal cells (GVHD). Giving atorvastatin to the donor before transplant may prevent severe GVHD.

NCT ID: NCT00789776 Active, not recruiting - Clinical trials for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Fludarabine Phosphate, Cyclophosphamide, Total-Body Irradiation, and Donor Bone Marrow Transplant Followed by Donor Natural Killer Cell Therapy, Mycophenolate Mofetil, and Tacrolimus in Treating Patients With Hematologic Cancer

Start date: October 2008
Phase: Phase 1/Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase I/II trial studies the side effects and best dose of donor natural killer (NK) cell therapy and to see how well it works when given together with fludarabine phosphate, cyclophosphamide, total-body irradiation, donor bone marrow transplant, mycophenolate mofetil, and tacrolimus in treating patients with hematologic cancer. Giving chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate and cyclophosphamide, and total-body irradiation before a donor bone marrow transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Giving an infusion of the donor's T cells (donor lymphocyte infusion) may help the patient's immune system see any remaining cancer cells as not belonging in the patient's body and destroy them (called graft-versus-tumor effect). Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Giving mycophenolate mofetil and tacrolimus after the transplant may stop this from happening.

NCT ID: NCT00719888 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Mantle Cell Lymphoma

Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant, Cyclophosphamide, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total-Body Irradiation in Treating Patients With Hematologic Disease

Start date: November 18, 2005
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial studies how well giving an umbilical cord blood transplant together with cyclophosphamide, fludarabine phosphate, and total-body irradiation (TBI) works in treating patients with hematologic disease. Giving chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide and fludarabine phosphate, and TBI before a donor umbilical cord blood transplant helps stop the growth of cancer and abnormal cells and helps stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Giving cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil after transplant may stop this from happening.

NCT ID: NCT00105001 Active, not recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Tacrolimus and Mycophenolate Mofetil With or Without Sirolimus in Preventing Acute Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Patients Who Are Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant for Hematologic Cancer

Start date: November 2004
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This randomized phase II trial studies how well giving tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) with or without sirolimus works in preventing acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in patients undergoing donor stem cell transplant for hematologic cancer. Giving low doses of chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate, and total-body-irradiation before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It also stops the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. The donated stem cells may replace the patient's immune system and help destroy any remaining cancer cells (graft-versus-tumor effect). Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can also make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Giving MMF and tacrolimus with or without sirolimus after transplant may stop this from happening.