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Metabolism and Nutrition Disorder clinical trials

View clinical trials related to Metabolism and Nutrition Disorder.

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NCT ID: NCT03548987 Recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

Research Study Investigating How Well Semaglutide Works in People Suffering From Overweight or Obesity

STEP 4
Start date: June 4, 2018
Phase: Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

This study will look at the change in participant's body weight from the start to the end of the study. This is to compare the effect on body weight in people taking semaglutide (a new medicine) and people taking "dummy" medicine. In addition to taking the medicine, the participant will have talks with study staff about healthy food choices, how to be more physically active and what a participant can do to lose weight. The participant will get semaglutide for the first 20 weeks. Then the participant will get either semaglutide or "dummy" medicine - which treatment the participant gets after the 20 weeks is decided by chance. The participants will need to take 1 injection once a week. The study medicine is injected with a thin needle in a skin fold in the stomach, thigh or upper arm. The study will last for about 1.5 years.

NCT ID: NCT03548935 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Metabolism and Nutrition Disorder

STEP 1: Research Study Investigating How Well Semaglutide Works in People Suffering From Overweight or Obesity

STEP 1
Start date: June 4, 2018
Phase: Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

This study will look at the change in participants' body weight from the start to the end of the study. The weight loss in participants taking semaglutide (a new medicine) will be compared to the weight loss of participants taking "dummy" medicine. In addition to taking the medicine, participants will have talks with study staff about healthy food choices, how to be more physically active and what you can do to lose weight. Participants will either get semaglutide or "dummy" medicine - which treatment participants get, is decided by chance. Participants will need to take 1 injection once a week. The study medicine is injected with a thin needle in a skin fold in the stomach, thigh or upper arm. The study will last for about 1.5 years. Participants will have 15 clinic visits and 10 phone calls with the study doctor.

NCT ID: NCT03479892 Recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

A Research Study Looking at a New Study Medicine (NNC0194-0499) for Weight Control in People With Overweight or Obesity

Start date: March 13, 2018
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This study looks at a new study medicine for weight control in people with overweight or obesity. The aim of this study is to see if the study medicine is safe for people to take. The study also looks at how fast the body removes the study medicine. The participants will either get NNC0194-0499 (the study medicine) or placebo (a formula that looks like the medicine but does not have active ingredients). Which treatment the participants get is decided by chance. The participants will get 1 or more injections into the skin of stomach area once each week for 12 weeks. The study will last for about 4 to 5 months. The participants will have 18 visits to the clinic.

NCT ID: NCT03479762 Recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

In Market Utilisation of Liraglutide Used for Weight Management in the UK: a Study in the CPRD Primary Care Database

Start date: April 13, 2018
Phase:
Study type: Observational

This study is conducted in Europe. The aim of this study is to investigate usage of liraglutide for weight management in clinical practice using the CPRD (Clinical Practice Research Datalink) primary care database.

NCT ID: NCT03451968 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Metabolism and Nutrition Disorder

Amino Acid Metabolism in Fed Surgical Critically Ill Patients

Start date: June 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Introduction Sarcopenia is defined as progressive generalized loss of skeletal muscle mass, strength and function. Sarcopenia due to lack of physical activity is a known phenomenon and is usually observed as a normal part of aging or in certain diseases and pathogenic processes. Major associated factors causing development of sarcopenia may be summarized as interactions of environmental and hormonal factors, underlying diseases, activation of inflammatory pathways, mitochondrial dysfunction, reduced satellite cell numbers, and loss of neuromuscular junctions. Intensive care acquired weakness (ICU-AW) known formerly as critical illness polyneuropathy, is a diagnosis that becomes more common as survival rates from long ICU hospitalization are more prevalent. It is characterized by a primary axonal degeneration, without demyelination, that typically affects motor nerves more than sensory nerves. ICU-AW affects the limbs (particularly the lower extremities) in a symmetric pattern. Weakness is most notable in proximal neuromuscular areas (e.g., the shoulders and hip girdle). In addition, involvement of the respiratory muscles can occur and can impede weaning from mechanical ventilation. The pathophysiological mechanisms of ICU-acquired weakness are believed to be multifactorial. Some suspected factors include dysfunctional microcirculation and hyperglycemia. It has been shown that tight glucose control in ICU patients reduces the risk for ICU-AW (although it has been associated with other adverse events). Sodium channels channelopathy is also a researched cause for ICU-AW. Muscle loss in the ICU are usually related to bedridden condition and lack of mobility, increase in ubiquitination and inadequate protein administration associated with large negative nitrogen balance. In addition mechanical ventilation contributes greatly to this problem. This has been particularly relevant in post trauma/surgical long stayer patients. In the past years great progress was made in the investigation of protein balance, breakdown and synthesis using stable isotope tracers in various medical conditions. In a research performed in PICU (1-5) and ICU (6, 7) regarding the measurement of plasma amino acid during critical illness, stable phenylalanine, tyrosine leucine, arginine and citrulline isotope were used intravenously without any safety issue problem. Another study was performed on adults suffering from COPD with matched healthy adults, using stable isotopes of phenylalanine, tyrosine leucine, isoleucine and valine (8). During the study the isotopes were given parenterally as well as enterally. The study showed significant change in splanchnic extraction of various amino acids and higher turnover of BCAA in COPD patients. Using the theory that supplemental milk can compensate for the elevated turnover of BCAA in COPD patients, using the isotope analysis demonstrated that this theory was proven wrong and the conclusion was that alterations are present in BCAA metabolism despite normal plasma levels in normal weight COPD. Further research is needed to find a way to compensate for it. These studies and other recent studies (9-19) show us the safety regarding the use of stable isotope tracers whether IV or PO, while giving us the opportunity to assess the metabolism of amino acid in all sorts of pathological states. Hypothesis & Aim of the study We think that based on current literature, there are important differences between critically ill patients and healthy population in the amino acid profile and distribution in the body as well as synthesis and breakdown. The aim of the study is to measure these differences in long ICU stayers (above 7 days) admitted in the ICU after surgical/trauma injury, and to try and help aiming future treatment and research in this field.

NCT ID: NCT03308721 Recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

Research Study Investigating Study Medicine (NNC9204-1177) for Weight Management in People With Overweight or Obesity

Start date: October 16, 2017
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This study looks at a new study medicine for weight management in people with overweight or obesity. The aim of this study is to find out how safe and tolerable the study medicine is. The study also looks at how the study medicine behaves in the body and how it is removed from the body. Participants will either get NNC9204-1177 (the new study medicine) or placebo (a formula that looks like the study medicine but does not have active ingredients). Which treatment participants get will be decided by chance. NNC9204-1177 has not been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration. Its use in this study is experimental. Participants will get 1 or more injections into the skin of the stomach area once each week for 12 weeks. The study will last for about 5 months. Participants will have 19 clinic visits with the study doctor. At certain times during the study, participants will have blood draws and 3 different kinds of electrocardiograms. Participants will answer mental health questionnaires. Women: Women cannot take part if pregnant, breast-feeding or plan to become pregnant during the study period.

NCT ID: NCT03240757 Completed - Clinical trials for Metabolism and Nutrition Disorder

Metabolic and Functional Impact of Various Breakfast Models

Start date: July 14, 2009
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

In the present study the investigators compared the hormonal and metabolic effects of three meal loads very popular among Italian eating habits, both in the resting- and exercising state. Given the lack of time is considered a common barrier to exercise adherence, we wanted to identify a low dose of exercise capable to produce health benefits in the post-absorptive status elicited by three commonly consumed meal-models in Mediterranean countries. To this end, healthy young volunteers firstly underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and three meal tolerance tests. Secondly, in an extra set of experiments, subjects cycled at low intensity for the last 20 minutes of the same glucose/meal tolerance test. Glycemia, insulinemia, ghrelinemia, lipidemia, and satiety were measured throughout OGTT and each test-meal load.

NCT ID: NCT03235102 Completed - Obesity Clinical Trials

Awareness, Care and Treatment in Obesity Management

Start date: August 3, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

This study aims to assess barriers that prevent obesity patients from receiving adequate care for their condition. The non-interventional study will be administered in the form of a 30-minute, cross-sectional, online survey to various respondents. There is no experimentation involved in the process of data collection, and each survey poses minimal human risk. The study will evaluate lifestyle habits and weight management strategies perceived and/or practiced by each of 3 stakeholders in obesity: Patients (People with obesity), Providers, and Employers. A customized survey will be administered to each of the 3 stakeholders, and data will be analyzed based on respondents' answers.

NCT ID: NCT03223493 Completed - Obesity Clinical Trials

Awareness, Care & Treatment in Obesity Management (ACTION) Study

ACTION
Start date: October 29, 2015
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

The ACTION (Awareness, Care, and Treatment In Obesity management) study aims to identify perceptions, attitudes, behaviours, and potential barriers to effective obesity care across three respondent types: 1) People with Obesity, 2) Healthcare Providers and 3) Employer Representatives in the US. Data is collected via online surveys using a cross-sectional, US-based stratified sample design.

NCT ID: NCT03121885 Active, not recruiting - Hypoxia Clinical Trials

Human Metabolic Dynamics at Rest and During Aerobic Exercise Under Normobaric Normoxic and Moderate Hypoxic Conditions

Start date: January 1, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The aim is to define in detail metabolic pathways at rest and during aerobic exercise in normal and healthy men and women under normobaric normoxic and moderate hypoxic conditions, using metabolomics technologies based on minimally invasive sampling relying on gas chromatography and mass spectrometry.