Clinical Trials Logo

Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 clinical trials

View clinical trials related to Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2.

Filter by:

NCT ID: NCT03316690 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2

The Interaction Between Metformin and Physical Training

Start date: October 20, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Physical activity is a first line treatment for patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D), however, the vast majority of patients with T2D do not achieve satisfying glycemic control with physical activity alone, which is why pharmacological treatment with metformin is most often initiated. It is known that metformin and exercise both activates 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in skeletal muscle and liver, and the activation of AMPK results in many different metabolic effects, including improvements in glycemic control. Because of this similarity in mechanism of action, an interaction between metformin and exercise is plausible, but knowledge in the area is sparse. Thus, the aim of this study is to assess the effects of training with and without concomitant metformin treatment, in order to investigate whether an interaction between the two occur. Subjects with impaired glucose tolerance will all undergo 12 weeks of training but will be randomized (1:1) to concomitant metformin/placebo treatment in a double-blinded way. Experimental days will be performed before randomisation (before initiation of metformin/placebo treatment), before initiation of the training period and after the training period.

NCT ID: NCT03315988 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2

The Effects of an 8-week Vegan Diet on TMAO Levels and Post-challenge Glucose Levels in Individuals With Dysglycaemia

PYH
Start date: October 4, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The amount of people with diabetes mellitus has now reached over 4 million in the United Kingdom. Type 2 diabetes accounts for the majority of all cases of diabetes and increases the risk of many other diseases such as heart problems. Plant based diets are thought to be an effective way to improve markers of health related to type 2 diabetes and heart disease. One way that a plant based diet improves health could be through reducing waste products that are generated in the gut by the bacteria that break down food as part of the digestion process. For example, the digestion of some meats, fish and eggs results in the creation of a substance called Trimethylamine-N-Oxide (TMAO) which has been linked to worse health outcomes in several studies. However, the full impact on TMAO and blood glucose levels of swapping regular meat consumption for a plant based vegan diet is not fully understood and requires further research. Therefore, the aim of this study will be to develop and undertake a clinical trial to investigate the effects of an 8-week vegan diet on TMAO levels and post challenge glucose levels in individuals with dysglycaemia (drug naïve). The study will be interventional single group prospective trial of adults aged 18-75 years of age from a multi-ethnic population with dysglycaemia (drug naïve). A sample of 29 people will be sought. The dietary intervention (vegan diet) will last 8 weeks. Then, the participants will go back to their normal diet and come for their final visit after a four week follow-up period (week 12). To assess the effectiveness of the intervention, primary and secondary outcome data collected at baseline will be compared with data collected at 1 week, 8 weeks and 12 weeks.

NCT ID: NCT03315780 Not yet recruiting - Type 2 Diabetes Clinical Trials

A Study of the Glucodynamic Effects of Dulaglutide (LY2189265) in Japanese Participants With Type 2 Diabetes

Start date: October 28, 2017
Phase: Phase 4
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the glucodynamic effects of dulaglutide in Japanese participants with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

NCT ID: NCT03315728 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 With Hyperglycemia

Pathways for Health Equity Quality Improvement Strategy

Start date: October 26, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

The PATHWAYS for Health Equity research program builds on the 5-year FORGE AHEAD Indigenous diabetes quality improvement research program (2013 - 2017). PATHWAYS for Health Equity, a 3-year research program (2017 - 2019), is a great opportunity to continue our important collaborative diabetes quality improvement research with an increasing number of Indigenous partnering communities and researchers and key stakeholders (collaborators, policymakers and knowledge-users). Four partnering First Nations communities will join the Pathways program to develop community-driven quality improvement initiatives championed by a Community Facilitator and supported by a Community Data Coordinator.

NCT ID: NCT03315143 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Effect of Sotagliflozin on Cardiovascular and Renal Events in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes and Moderate Renal Impairment Who Are at Cardiovascular Risk

SCORED
Start date: November 30, 2017
Phase: Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

Primary Objectives: To demonstrate that, when compared to placebo in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D), cardiovascular (CV) risk factors, and moderately impaired renal function, sotagliflozin: - Does not increase the risk of cardiovascular events including death from cardiovascular disease, non-fatal heart attack and non-fatal stroke; - Reduces the risk of death from CV disease or hospitalization for heart failure. Secondary Objectives: - To demonstrate that, when compared to placebo in patients with T2D, CV risk factors, and moderately impaired renal function, sotagliflozin: - Reduces cardiovascular events including death from cardiovascular disease, non-fatal heart attack and non-fatal stroke; - Reduces risk of progression of kidney disease; - Reduces cardiovascular events including death from cardiovascular disease and emergency treatment for heart failure; - Reduces death from cardiovascular disease; - Reduces death from any cause. - To assess the safety and tolerability of sotagliflozin.

NCT ID: NCT03314246 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2

Development and Implementation of Ramadan Fasting Algorithm for Singaporeans With Type 2 Diabetes

FAST
Start date: April 3, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Background: Ramadan fasting is a religious observance carried out by Muslims all over the world. During Ramadan, Muslims abstain from eating, drinking, and smoking during daylight hours. Although Muslims who are ill, including patients with diabetes, are exempted from fasting, many devoted Muslim patients still insist on fasting despite being advised not to by their healthcare providers. Concerns have been raised over how the practice of fasting may affect the metabolic control of Muslim patients with diabetes. Furthermore, it has also been postulated that the act of fasting may increase the risk of hypoglycemia or glucose toxicity. Although practice algorithms and suggestions on the use of glycemic therapies during fasting have been discussed internationally. they are not generalizable as the observances of Ramadan, duration of fasting and the food ingested differ from one country to another. Aims: This study aims to develop and implement a clinical practice dose-adjustment algorithm dedicated to the care of Singaporean patients with diabetes who fast during Ramadan. Hypothesis: The use of clinical practice dose-adjustment algorithm can improve both clinical and humanistic outcomes of patients with type 2 diabetes who wish to fast during Ramadan. Methods: This is a prospective, randomized, interventional study involving patients with type 2 diabetes who wish to fast for at least 10 days during Ramadan. Eligible patient attending a primary care institution or an outpatient specialist clinic of a tertiary institution will be approached to participate in the study. Consented patients will be randomized to either intervention arm or control arm. Patients in the control arm will receive usual care while patients in the intervention arm will be given additional education session on Ramadan fasting related diabetic management advice and an algorithm that was developed by the study team members based on international guidelines, to guide them on self-management during Ramadan. The primary outcomes will be change in HbA1c. Secondary outcomes include change in fasting blood glucose, post prandial blood glucose, medication adherence and humanistic outcomes. The safety outcomes include self reported incidence of major and minor hypoglycemia as well as hyperglycemia during Ramadan month. All outcomes will be measured at baseline, during Ramadan and at 3 month post Ramadan. Significance: The validation of the algorithm through this study will ensure effective and safe fasting of patients with type 2 diabetes during Ramadan.

NCT ID: NCT03313960 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2

A Randomized Controlled Trial Evaluating One Drop | Premium With Afrezza vs. One Drop | Premium Alone

Start date: October 5, 2017
Phase: Phase 4
Study type: Interventional

The A-One study is a prospective, randomized controlled trial evaluating the use of the One Drop | Premium 'On Track' in combination with Afrezza treatment on the glycemic control, treatment adherence, social-cognitive barriers to adherence, and treatment satisfaction of people with Type 2 diabetes (T2D) and a hemoglobin A1c (A1c) of 7.5-10.5% already prescribed an injectable rapid-acting insulin.

NCT ID: NCT03313856 Completed - Clinical trials for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Effect of Oral Administration of a Herbarium Mixture (Guazuma Ulmifolia and Tecoma Stans) on Metabolic Profile in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

GUATECO
Start date: January 10, 2010
Phase: Phase 2/Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

To evaluate the effect of oral administration of herbarium mixture Guazuma ulmifolia (GU) and Tecoma stans (TS) on metabolic profile in type 2 diabetic patients.

NCT ID: NCT03313752 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Type2 Diabetes Mellitus

Effects of SGLT2 Inhibition on Myocardial Insulin Sensitivity

DapaHeart
Start date: December 1, 2017
Phase: Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

A Phase III, single-centre, randomized, 2-arm, parallel-group, double blind, placebo-controlled study, consisting of a screening phase (Days -14 to -1), a 4-week double-blind, placebo-controlled treatment phase and a 4-week follow-up phase. Subjects: Type 2 diabetic patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) not requiring revascularization, with sub-optimal glycemic control (HbA1c 7.5-8.5%) on their current anti-hyperglycemic regimen Subjects will be randomized in a 1:1 ratio to dapagliflozin or placebo. Subjects will undergo screening assessment in the 14-day period preceding administration of the first dose of study drug on Day 1. Primary Objective The primary objective is to assess the effect of dapagliflozin on myocardial insulin sensitivity Secondary Objective The secondary objective is to assess global heart function, and metabolic systemic effects of dapagliflozin, and glycemic control. The study aims to enroll patients with type 2 diabetes with poor glycemic control, and with coronary artery disease not requiring revascularization, who have already undergone, under routine cardiological assessment, a positron emission tomography (PET) 13NH3 scan in order to assess the cardiovascular function. Thus, the study aims to assess whether the improvement in cardiac metabolism obtained with dapagliflozin is greater than that obtained with normal clinical practice (according to Standards of Care).

NCT ID: NCT03313297 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2

Glucocorticoids and Skin Healing in Diabetes (GC-SHealD)

GC-SHealD
Start date: December 1, 2017
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

The study aims to investigate effects of inhibiting glucocorticoid activation on skin function and wound healing in patients with type 2 diabetes. Half of patients will be given a drug to inhibit glucocorticoid activation and the other half will be given a placebo.