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NCT ID: NCT03737227 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Lumbar Intervertebral Motion

Lumbar Intervertebral Motion in Asymptomatic Male Participants

Start date: December 1, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The investigators aim to analyze the physiological segmental motion of the lumbar spine during flexion and extension cinematographic recordings of asymptomatic individuals.

NCT ID: NCT03733743 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2

Day-night Rhythm in Muscle Metabolism of Prediabetics

Start date: July 9, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This study evaluates the existence of a day-night rhythm in skeletal muscle energy metabolism in prediabetic subjects. Subjects will stay at the research facility for 44 hours with a standardized living protocol during which several measurements of skeletal muscle and whole body energy metabolism will be performed.

NCT ID: NCT03732898 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Parkinson's Disease (PD)

Coordinated Reset Deep Brain Stimulation

RESET-DBS
Start date: November 30, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The study will explore the viability of an alternative programming strategy in Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) for patients with Parkinson's Disease (PD).

NCT ID: NCT03732820 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer

Study on Olaparib Plus Abiraterone as First-line Therapy in Men With Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer

Start date: October 31, 2018
Phase: Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety (including evaluating side effects) of combination of olaparib and abiraterone versus placebo and abiraterone in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) who have received no prior cytotoxic chemotherapy or new hormonal agents (NHAs) at metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) stage.

NCT ID: NCT03730909 Recruiting - Type1diabetes Clinical Trials

The Effect Lactate Administration on Cerebral Blood Flow During Hypoglycemia

Start date: June 11, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

It is thought that altered brain lactate handling is involved in the development of impaired awareness of hypoglycemia (IAH), i.e. the inability to timely detect hypoglycemia in people with type 1 diabetes (T1DM). Infusion of lactate diminishes symptomatic and hormonal responses to hypoglycemia in patients with normal awareness of hypoglycemia (NAH), resembling the situation of patients with IAH. It is unknown whether this attenuating effect is due to brain lactate oxidation or the result of lactate-induced alterations of global and regional cerebral blood flow (CBF). Normally, hypoglycemia causes a redistribution of CBF towards the thalamus, from where the sympathetic response to hypoglycemia is coordinated, but in IAH this effect is absent and global CBF is increased. We hypothesize that lactate infusion in patients with NAH will result in blunting of thalamic activation and/or enhanced global CBF. If so, these results may help delineating the pathogenesis of IAH which eventually creates new avenues to protect against the morbidity associated with hypoglycemia and IAH. Study design: Single-blind placebo controlled, randomized cross-over intervention study Study population: T1DM patients with NAH (n=10) Intervention: On two separate occasions, patients with T1DM and NAH will undergo a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic-hypoglycemic glucose clamp with or without the infusion of exogenous lactate. ASL-MRI will be applied to measure global and regional changes in CBF. Main study parameters/endpoints: The change in regional thalamic CBF in response to intravenous lactate infusion compared to placebo, during hypoglycemia

NCT ID: NCT03729739 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Coronary Artery Disease

Functional Assessment by Virtual Online Reconstruction. The FAVOR III Europe Japan Study

FAVOR III EJ
Start date: November 2, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Quantitative Flow Ratio (QFR) is a novel method for evaluating the functional significance of coronary stenosis. QFR is estimated based on two angiographic projections. Studies have shown a good correlation with the present wire-based standard approach Fractional Flow Reserve (FFR) for assessment of intermediate coronary stenosis. The purpose of the FAVOR III Europe Japan study is to investigate if a QFR-based diagnostic strategy will results in non-inferior clinical outcome after 12 months compared to a standard pressure-wire guided strategy in evaluation of patients with chest pain (stable angina pectoris) and intermediate coronary stenosis.

NCT ID: NCT03729661 Not yet recruiting - Breast Cancer Clinical Trials

Exploratory Study on Therapy for Breath Hold in Radiotherapy

Start date: December 1, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Due to breathing and other motions, tumours, such as breast and lung cancer, as well as their surrounding organs (e.g. the heart), move, which poses a challenge for radiotherapy treatment. Reducing or even stopping breathing, e.g. by irradiating during inspiration, is a way to decrease tumour and organ motion resulting in a reliable target coverage with smaller margins. These smaller margins can result in a better sparing of normal tissues. Furthermore, in some patients, during inspiration, the heart may move away from the target volume making it possible to better spare the heart. Finally, during inspiration, the lung volume is larger and the lung density is lower, which can lead to a lower dose to the surrounding normal lung tissue. Reduction of radiation dose to normal tissues leads to less radiation-induced toxicity. This makes treating breast and lung cancer patients in breath hold (BH) conditions an attractive strategy. Standard BH durations in RT treatment are around 20 seconds, which is not enough to perform a complete CBCT. The health status of lung cancer patients is generally worse compared to breast cancer patients, making it more difficult to treat this patient group during breath hold. Nasal High Flow Therapy (NHFT) is a non-invasive system that provides controlled oxygen concentrations and low levels of positive pressure via a nasal interface. NHFT improves oxygenation in diverse patient groups, and is increasingly used as an alternative to mechanical ventilatory support. It has been shown to be a safe device in several clinical situations and patient populations, such as COPD patients, but also in apneic conditions under general anesthesia.

NCT ID: NCT03729297 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Salivary Gland Cancer

Cabozantinib in Advanced Salivary Gland Cancer Patients

Cabo ASAP
Start date: September 5, 2018
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

Phase 2 clinical trial on the efficacy of cabozantinib in locally advanced, recurrent and/or metastatic salivary gland cancer patients.

NCT ID: NCT03728998 Recruiting - Sepsis Clinical Trials

Non-invasive Measurement of CO in Patients With Uncomplicated Sepsis

Start date: May 1, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Little is known about the optimal fluid therapy of patients with uncomplicated sepsis. Most recommendations are extrapolated from studies performed in patients with septic shock. Therefore, it is unknown how effective our current fluid therapy is. Furthermore, current therapy is not tailored to individual needs. The aim of the current study is to investigate the added value of non-invasive measurements of (dynamic) circulatory parameters in the treatment of a convenience sample of sepsis patients presenting to the ED.

NCT ID: NCT03728855 Not yet recruiting - Patient Safety Clinical Trials

Effects of Self-administration of Medication During Hospitalization on Medication Safety, Adherence, and Patient Satisfaction in Dutch Hospitals

MIEB
Start date: November 1, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

During hospitalization, medication administration errors (MAEs) occur daily in health care and can lead to serious harm. Improvement of medication safety is a major concern to policymakers and health care workers. Inpatient self-administration of medication (SAM) during hospital admission could be a way to reduce MAEs. Therefore the aim of this study is to determine the effect of inpatient self-administration of medication on the number of medication administration errors during hospitalization.