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Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease clinical trials

View clinical trials related to Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

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NCT ID: NCT03584269 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

Innovation in NOn Invasive Ventilation in COPD Patients Treated by Long Term Oxygen Therapy

INOV-LTOT
Start date: June 28, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The aim of this study is to investigate the efficacy of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) on nocturnal hypoventilation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who are on long term oxygen therapy (LTOT) at home.

NCT ID: NCT03577002 Not yet recruiting - Cancer Clinical Trials

Team-based Versus Primary Care Clinician-led Advance Care Planning in Practice-based Research Networks

Start date: January 1, 2019
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This project compares two models of the Serious Illness Care Program (SICP) in primary care: clinician-focused SICP and team-based SICP. Discussion and planning for serious illness care can help patients identify what is most important to them and assure they receive care that best matches their goals and values, such as spending more time at home or not being in pain.

NCT ID: NCT03568747 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

Efficacy and Mechanism of NIV in Relieving Dyspnea After Exercise in Patients With Stable Severe COPD

Start date: May 1, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Exertional dyspnea is a major cause of exercise limitation and anxiety, and contributes importantly to reduced quality of life for patients with COPD. The aim of this study is to determine the efficacy and mechanism of NIV with a dual-limb circuit plus oxygen therapy in relieving exertional dyspnea in patients with severe COPD, so as to provide a guidance for clinical use for NIV.

NCT ID: NCT03567772 Completed - Clinical trials for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

Videogame Assisted Pulmonary Rehabilitation in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

Start date: February 1, 2014
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Pulmonary rehabilitation programs (PRP) are a key factor of comprehensive management of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Interactive game-based systems have been proposed to improve effects and/or compliance to PRP. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of wiifit nintendo as a PRP tool in COPD patients with a randomized controlled trial methods. The patients were divided into experimental (EG) and control (CG) group. The EG performed wiifit program (yoga, strength training, aerobic exercise) twice a week for 6 weeks, the CG performed cycle ergometer twice a week for 6 weeks. The investigators evaluated pre and post treatment: Six-minute walking test, Transitional Dyspnea Index, and Saint George Respiratory Questionnaire.The hypothesis are the EG able to show improvement in exercise tolerance, dyspnea, and quality of life.

NCT ID: NCT03566667 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

Beta-blockers to Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

Start date: June 12, 2018
Phase: Phase 4
Study type: Interventional

Background: In patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and concomitant cardiovascular conditions cardio-selective beta-blockers reduce mortality and can be used without significant negative effects on lung function or respiratory symptoms. Observational studies indicate that beta-blocker therapy in COPD even without overt cardiovascular disease, is associated with reduced risk for mortality and COPD exacerbations. Aim: The overall purpose of our study is to examine the benefit of general beta-blocker therapy on important patient-oriented measures in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Our primary hypothesis that treatment with beta-blockers in patients with COPD and no comorbid heart disease at baseline can prevent a Composite measure of hospitalizations due to cardiovascular diseases, COPD exacerbations and death. Population: 1700 patients with C OPD. Inclusion criteria are FEV1/FVC < 70, age >40 years and sinus rhythm 50-120/min. Exclusion criteria include hypersensitivity against metoprolol, atrioventricular (AV) block II or II or sick sinus syndrome without pacemaker, atrial fibrillation or flutter, clinical signs of or previously known cardiovascular disease, systolic blood pressure < 90, severe asthma, present beta-blocker therapy or ongoing COPD exacerbation. Intervention: Metoprolol at a target dose of 100 mg in addition to standard COPD care. Control: No placebo control. Randomized, pragmatic un-blinded controlled study where the control Group receives standard COPD care. Outcome: The primary outcome is a composite measure of all-cause mortality, C OPD exacerbations, and cardiovascular events after one year. Endpoint data from Swedish national registries and clinical follow-up. Importance: Beta-blocker treatment to attenuate morbidity in patients with COPD could have great clinical and social importance at a low cost.

NCT ID: NCT03564028 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

Energy Conservation Technique in COPD Patients

UpstAIR
Start date: July 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterised by non-reversible bronchial obstruction associated with systemic disorders and comorbid factors. Dynamic hyperinflation during an exercise increase dyspnea and can reduce exercise capacity. Stair climbing is associated with prolonged dynamic hyperinflation and severe dyspnea in COPD patients. The aim of this study is to carry out the effect of an energy conservation technique on dyspnea to facilitate stair climbing.

NCT ID: NCT03555097 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

Effects of Non-invasive Ventilation on Respiratory Mechanics and NRD in Patients With Stable COPD

Start date: July 1, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic respiratory disease characterized by persistent respiratory symptoms and airflow limitation. Pervasive dynamic pulmonary hyperinflation (DPH) and intrinsic positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEPi) can increase inspiratory threshold load and respiratory effort, leading to abnormal changes in respiratory mechanics and neural respiratory drive (NRD). Non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) is not only widely used in respiratory failure, but also is one of the important lung rehabilitation strategies. Several studies have reported that the use of biphasic positive airway pressure (BIPAP) mode for NPPV can improve ventilation, reduce NRD, improve NRD coupling, significantly reduce inspiratory muscle load and relieve symptoms. However, relatively few studies are reported that the NPPV is used in COPD patients without non-respiratory failure. Therefore, we suppose that for stable COPD patients without respiratory failure, early intervention with NPPV may reduce DPH, eliminate the adverse effects of PEEPi, reduce the respiratory muscle load, improve the respiratory physiological characteristics, and delay the progression of the disease. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to observe the influence of different levels of BIPAP ventilation on respiratory mechanics and NRD in patients with stable COPD, and to explore whether BiPAP ventilation can be used as a pulmonary rehabilitation method for early intervention of COPD and provide a theoretical basis for subsequent clinical trials.

NCT ID: NCT03554460 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

Evaluation of CO2 Rebreathing During Exercise With the Increasing Ventilation Assisted by NIV With a Dual-limb Circuit

Start date: October 1, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Ventilated by a single-limb tubing with PEV caused CO2 rebreathing to COPD patients during exercise with the increasing ventilation. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether CO2 rebreathing could be avoided with the use of the dual-limb circuit, to provide a theoretical basis of more rational clinical application of NIV in the setting of increasing ventilation(eg, after exercise).

NCT ID: NCT03546907 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

Proof-of-Concept Study to Assess the Efficacy, Safety and Tolerability of SAR440340 (Anti-IL-33 mAb) in Patients With Moderate-to-severe Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

Start date: July 20, 2018
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

Primary Objective: To investigate effects of SAR440340 (anti-interleukin-33 [IL‑33] monoclonal antibody [mAb]) compared with placebo, on the annualized rate of moderate-to-severe acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD) over up to 52 weeks of treatment. - Moderate exacerbations are recorded by the Investigator and defined as AECOPD that require either systemic corticosteroids (such as intramuscular, intravenous or oral) and/or antibiotics. - Severe exacerbations are recorded by the Investigator and defined as AECOPD requiring hospitalization, emergency medical care visit or resulting in death. Secondary Objectives: To investigate effects of SAR440340 compared with placebo, on improving respiratory function, as assessed by pre‑bronchodilator forced exploratory volume in 1 second (FEV1). To evaluate effects of SAR440340 compared with placebo, on Post-bronchodilator FEV1. To evaluate effects of SAR440340 compared with placebo, on duration from baseline to first moderate or severe AECOPD event. To evaluate effects of SAR440340 compared with placebo, on safety and tolerability.

NCT ID: NCT03540901 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

Effect of Acetazolamide on Lung Water Content by Ultrasound in Patients With Respiratory Disease at Altitude

Start date: May 28, 2018
Phase: Phase 4
Study type: Interventional

This trial will evaluate the effect of acetazolamide (375 mg per day) vs. placebo on lung water content by ultrasound at acute altitude exposure in patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD).