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Abdominal Obesity Metabolic Syndrome clinical trials

View clinical trials related to Abdominal Obesity Metabolic Syndrome.

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NCT ID: NCT03020186 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Abdominal Obesity Metabolic Syndrome

Effects of Green-MED Diet Via the Gut-fat-brain Axis

DIRECT-PLUS
Start date: November 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Mediterranean (MED) diet, richer in plants/seeds (and dietary polyphenols) and low in processed meat (green-MED diet) may have a pronounced beneficial effect on age-related declines that begin in middle age, reflected by changes in adiposity, cognitive function, and cardiometabolic risk. The investigators hypothesize that long-term intake of this diet will significantly potentiate the effects of a healthy lifestyle (physical activity and Mediterranean diet), constituting a powerful strategy to halt or even reverse the progression of several age-related processes related to adiposity, cardiometabolic health and cognition. The investigators further hypothesize that lifestyle intervention might modify the gut microbiota profile and that autologous fecal microbiota supplement derived from the time of maximal weight loss might halt the expected subsequent regain phase.

NCT ID: NCT02954588 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Abdominal Obesity Metabolic Syndrome

Effect of Pyridoxamine Supplementation on Vascular Function and Insulin Sensitivity

Start date: October 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

A growing body of evidence demonstrates that increased adipose mass, especially visceral adipose tissue, contributes directly towards an increase in systemic inflammation, (micro-)vascular dysfunction and the burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD), insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Advanced glycation/lipoxidation endproducts (AGEs/ALEs) are a heterogeneous family of unavoidable by-products, which are formed by reactive metabolic intermediates derived from glucose and lipid oxidation. In addition to the overwhelming amount of data demonstrating the role of AGEs/ALEs in the development of (micro-)vascular dysfunction and disease, accumulation of AGEs/ALEs in the expanding adipose tissue contributes to the dysregulation of adipokines and the development of insulin resistance. The investigators want to examine, in a double-blind randomized placebo controlled parallel study, the physiological effect of a dietary intervention with pyridoxamine in abdominally obese persons.

NCT ID: NCT02626741 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Abdominal Obesity-Metabolic Syndrome

Effect of a Meal Replacement on Weight Loss Obesity Patients With Metabolic Syndrome

SlimWell
Start date: February 2015
Phase: Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of this study is to determine whether meal replacement, SlimWell ®, is effective in the treatment of obesity patients with metabolic syndrome.

NCT ID: NCT02353767 Completed - HIV Clinical Trials

Evaluation of Liver Fibrosis in HIV-infected Patients With Metabolic Syndrome

METAFIB
Start date: January 2011
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

This study aims to estimate the prevalence of bridging liver fibrosis and cirrhosis (METAVIR score ≥ F2) according to METAVIR score in HIV infected patients not chronically infected by viral hepatitis but exhibiting a metabolic syndrome according to the IDF definition (International Diabetes Foundation).

NCT ID: NCT02283242 Completed - Clinical trials for Abdominal Obesity Metabolic Syndrome

Galantamine Effects in Patients With Metabolic Syndrome

GALANTA-MS
Start date: March 2014
Phase: Phase 4
Study type: Interventional

It is recognized that inflammation can be modulated by cholinergic stimulation and that galantamine, an inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase enzyme with central nervous system action, has showed an anti-inflammatory effect, reducing body weight, abdominal fat and improvement in tissue insulin resistance in animal models. Galantamine is a safe drug that is used to treat alzheimer disease.Galantamine treatments of patients with the metabolic syndrome may represent a significant advance in management of this disease. This study aims to investigate the effects of galantamine on inflammatory markers, as well as on abdominal visceral and epicardial fat and oxidative stress in patients with metabolic syndrome. This is a pioneering study that will include expert support. The enrolling of subjects will have continuous monitoring throughout the period of treatment. The study is a double blind randomized prospective study with 60 patients with metabolic syndrome, to be randomized at ratio of 1: 1 placebo and galantamine. The dose of galanthamine is the standard clinically approved (8 and 16 mg). The tracking method include metabolic analysis, inflammatory and oxidative stress markers, hemodynamic evaluation with hear rate variability (sympatho vagal modulation) before, during and after treatment. Computerized tomography assessment of visceral abdominal and epicardial fat before and after treatment will be performed.

NCT ID: NCT02001376 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Abdominal Obesity Metabolic Syndrome

A Health Promotion Project for Workers at National Taiwan University Hospital

Start date: April 2011
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Background and Purpose: Fitness is the foundation for health and quality of life for individuals. Recent changes in lifestyle and eating habit in Taiwan have significantly increased the prevalence of metabolic syndrome that may lead to poor fitness and subsequent coronary artery disease, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Although workers at the National Taiwan University Hospital (NTUH) have undertaken regular health fitness examination, the examination did not include the posture and movement analysis and no exercise intervention was provided to those with metabolic syndrome. This study is therefore aimed to conduct comprehensive health fitness examination for workers at NTUH and to examine whether exercise intervention could decrease the risk factors and enhance fitness in those at risk or with metabolic syndrome. Methods: This study will consist of two parts. In the first part, 1102 workers at NTUH will be administered comprehensive fitness examination (body mass index, waist circumference, muscle strength, flexibility, balance, cardiopulmonary test, and posture and movement analysis) and will be assessed with the Physical Activity Readiness and the Perceived Musculoskeletal Pain Scale and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Those workers who are at risk or have metabolic syndrome (N=240) will be assigned into the control, home-based exercise, and intensive exercise group with 80 in each group with their will. The home-based exercise group will receive exercise instruction biweekly for three months; the intensive exercise group will receive moderate aerobic exercise and strengthening exercise three times a week for three months. The other workers who are insufficient fitness status (N=240) will be assigned into the control, home-based exercise, and intensive exercise group with their will. The home-based exercise group will receive exercise instruction biweekly for a month; the intensive exercise group with 80 in each group will receive moderate aerobic exercise and strengthening exercise three times a week for a month. Descriptive statistics will be used to estimate the prevalence of 1, 2 and ≧3 metabolic risk factors, and poor fitness. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) will be used to examine the relation between metabolic syndrome risk factors and fitness. One-way ANOVA will be used to compare the demographic characteristics of the control, home-based exercise, and intensive exercise group. Two-way ANOVA repeated measures will be used to examine the metabolic syndrome risk factors and fitness in the three groups across time. Clinical relevance: Our results will help understand the health fitness of workers at NTUH and will assist in establishing effective exercise program for those at risk or with metabolic syndrome.

NCT ID: NCT01887119 Recruiting - Hypertension Clinical Trials

Aldosterone Antagonism and Microvascular Function

Start date: October 2013
Phase: Phase 4
Study type: Interventional

The prevalence of obesity and obesity-related complications is currently taking epidemic proportions. These complications increase the risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, which are important causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. It is important to gain insight in the mechanisms underlying obesity-related complications, because this may lead to the development of directed therapeutic strategies. Currently, there is significant evidence that the cause of both insulin resistance and hypertension must be sought at the level of the microcirculation. Over activity of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system is a potential cause of microvascular dysfunction. Angiotensin II was indeed found to be implicated in the pathogenesis of obesity-associated hypertension and insulin resistance, possibly through interference with the vascular effects of insulin. Increased aldosterone levels have also been associated with resistant hypertension and insulin resistance, which is illustrated in patients with primary aldosteronism. Furthermore, aldosterone is known to exert several detrimental effects on the vasculature, some of which are offset by mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists. In obese individuals, plasma aldosterone concentrations are increased as well. We hypothesize that increased aldosterone levels in adipose persons induce microvascular dysfunction, which contributes to the development of insulin resistance and hypertension, and mineralocorticoid receptor antagonism results in improved insulin sensitivity and decreased blood pressure by counteracting the adverse effects of aldosterone on the microvasculature.

NCT ID: NCT01872182 Terminated - Clinical trials for Abdominal Obesity Metabolic Syndrome

Efficacy and Safety Study of ALS-L1023 in Patients With Abdominal Obesity of Metabolic Syndrome

Start date: May 2013
Phase: Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

The main objective of this study is to evaluate efficacy and safety of ALS-L1023 tablet in patients with abdominal obesity of metabolic syndrome.