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Depressive Disorder clinical trials

View clinical trials related to Depressive Disorder.

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NCT ID: NCT05637320 Not yet recruiting - Anxiety Disorders Clinical Trials

Big Feelings: A Study on Children's Emotions in Therapy

Start date: December 1, 2022
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The goal of this clinical trial is to learn about how psychotherapy works for children and adolescents aged 8 - 15 with anxiety, depression, trauma, or disruptive behaviour. The main question it aims to answer is: • Is the biobehavioural regulation of negative emotion a transdiagnostic mechanism of treatment response in psychotherapy for children with anxiety, depression, trauma and/or disruptive behaviour? Children and their parents will be randomly assigned to an evidence-based, transdiagnostic treatment (the Modular Approach to Therapy for Children with Anxiety, Depression, Trauma, and Conduct Problems; MATCH-ADTC) or a waitlist control condition. Participants in both groups will complete a baseline assessment, weekly measures consisting of brief symptom scales and medication tracking, and quarterly assessments every 3 months. Following the intervention/waitlist period, our team will conduct post-test assessments. All assessments, except for the weekly surveys, will consist of symptom scales, clinical interviews, experimental tasks and physiological measures.

NCT ID: NCT05634941 Recruiting - Depression Clinical Trials

Effect of ON-tDCS on Memory Function Improvement and Related Circuits in Stable Depression Patients

Start date: October 1, 2022
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

So far, antidepressant drugs have limited memory improvement. Transcranial direct current stimulation, as a non-invasive and safe neuroregulatory technique, is a new direction to improve memory.In this study, transcranial direct current stimulation of the greater occipital nerve was used to explore the effect of improving memory function in patients with stable depression, and related studies were conducted on the locus coeruleus-noadrenal loop and the functional connection between locus coeruleus, hippocampus and amygdala.

NCT ID: NCT05633368 Completed - Covid-19 Clinical Trials

Impact of Covid-19 Pandemic on Patients Receiving Continuation or Maintenance Electroconvulsive Therapy

COVID-M-ECT
Start date: March 31, 2020
Phase:
Study type: Observational

Electroconvulsive therapy is a safe and effective therapeutic strategy in patients with treatment resistant depression. As relapse after successful ECT is significant even with adequate pharmacological strategies, continuation (up to 6 months after completion of index-ECT) or maintenance ECT (more than 6 months after index-ECT) is often necessary to maintain remission. During the current Covid-19 pandemic hospitals redirected resources and closed or significantly diminished ECT services. In this study we aim to assess the impact of discontinuing maintenance electroconvulsive therapy in patients diagnosed with unipolar depressive disorder.

NCT ID: NCT05633186 Recruiting - Depression Clinical Trials

Sustainable Upscaling of Depression Prevention

Start date: August 31, 2022
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Research shows that online unguided self-help interventions focused on psycho-education, skills training and lifestyle can prevent mild mood complaints from turning into a full-blown depression. These encouraging results are found even though the adherence to these types of interventions is generally low. With this project, the investigators examine whether adherence to online unguided self-help interventions can be increased by additional motivational guidance elements and as such further improve the effectiveness. This is examined by adding three additional components to the intervention: 1) A coach who provides online feedback once a week to provide support. 2) Mobile application to monitor mood and related factors and to receive automated personalized messages, 3) Content based on the principles of motivational interviewing. A secondary aim is to compare the additional effects of the individual components against the additional costs.

NCT ID: NCT05632510 Active, not recruiting - Clinical trials for Peripartum Depression (PPD)

PREVENTION OF PERINATAL DEPRESSION BY EPDS DURING THE FIRST PRENATAL CONSULTATION AT MATERNITY DEPARTMENT

PREVIDEPP
Start date: October 21, 2022
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The risk of PPD for a woman giving birth ranges between 10 and 20% worldwide, with about a third of postpartum depression that begin during pregnancy. PPD has been associated to negative short-/long-term effects for the mother's health, the child's health and early interactions when left untreated. PPD is underdiagnosed, less than half of patients being diagnosed partly because of atypical symptoms, reluctance of patients to seek help, and because of the lack of systematic screening for this condition. Other specific biological changes could also be involved. Reduction in plasma oxytocin levels have been shown to be associated with the risk of PPD and heritability studies have identified a genetic contribution. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) is a self-administered questionnaire of 10 items, is recommended by the NICE guideline and French National Authority for Health for screening peripartum women, validated in French and well accepted. In France, the first contact with midwives or obstetricians during pregnancy usually occurs around the 4th month of pregnancy. French National Authority for Health recommends evaluation of risk factors for depression during this first consultation. However, this interview is rarely done probably because assessment of depression could be considered as difficult and time consuming. However, a meta-analysis shows that screening depression in the general population significantly reduces the risk for persistent depression (relative risk 0.87 [95%CI 0.79 to 0.95]), as compared to usual care. Our hypothesis is that early identification of vulnerability/depression in pregnant women would enable clinical team to offer adequate psychological and psychosocial care during pregnancy, thus reducing PPD in these women. The investigators propose to assess the impact of a systematic screening of depression using EPDS during an early consultation in comparison with usual practices, on the risk of depression during peripartum period (PPD).

NCT ID: NCT05632497 Not yet recruiting - Anorexia Nervosa Clinical Trials

Alteration of Symbiosis Intestinal Microbiota on Patients With Anorexia Nervosa

INT-METAVOSA
Start date: November 2022
Phase:
Study type: Observational

The purpose of this study will be to study the association between the level of psychic symptomatic of anorexia nervosa (AN) (intensity of food restriction, symptoms of anxiety and depression) and alteration of host environment symbiosis and the mechanism (dysbiosis of intestinal microbiota, increase of intestinal permeability, immunity alteration and low-grade inflammation).

NCT ID: NCT05631184 Not yet recruiting - Depression Clinical Trials

Self-administered Acupressure for Depression

SAAFD
Start date: December 15, 2022
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The goal of this clinical trial is to examine the effects of self-administered acupressure intervention for alleviating depressive symptoms among people with depression. It is hypothesized that the self-administered acupressure group would have a great improvement in depressive symptoms as measured by the Patient Health Questionnaire compared with the mental health education group across the 12-week intervention period. The main questions it aims to answer are: - Is the self-administered acupressure intervention more effective for alleviating depression and other related outcomes compared to the mental health education group among depressed individuals? - Is the self-administered acupressure intervention acceptable and feasible for depressed individuals to alleviate depression? Participants will be randomized into self-administered acupressure group or mental health education group based on the group allocation with a 1:1 ratio. Participants will attend two weekly 120-min self-administered acupressure training or mental health education, respectively.

NCT ID: NCT05630963 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Major Depressive Disorder

Beyond Monoamines: The Role of the Nociceptin/Orphanin FQ Receptor in Major Depression

Start date: December 29, 2021
Phase:
Study type: Observational

This study looks at the role of the Nociceptin/Orphanin FQ receptor system in the brain of individuals with current or past major depressive disorder (MDD). It also examines how individuals with a history of depression make certain decisions and which brain regions are involved in such decisions. Information collected through MRI, PET, biospecimens (i.e., blood, saliva) and behavioral tasks will be used to predict depressive symptoms in the future.

NCT ID: NCT05630469 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Depressive Disorder, Major

Prediction of Antidepressant Effects of Electroconvulsive Therapy

Start date: December 1, 2022
Phase:
Study type: Observational

Despite its successful use for more than 80 years, the mechanisms of action of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) are still not fully understood. ECT has been shown to be accompanied by changes in regional brain volumes and connectivity measures, as well as biochemical alterations. However, how these changes relate to ECT response remains to be further elucidated; up to now, there are no objective markers for the targeted use of ECT in clinical practice. Methods: Study design: longitudinal mono-centre study with duration of 36 months. Subjects: 30 depressed patients (aged 18-65 years) eligible for ECT. Measurements: subjects will undergo 2 3-Tesla MRI scans (one before and one after a course of ECT), including structural MRI, resting-state functional MRI, task-based functional MRI and MR spectroscopy. Blood, CSF sampling and clinical assessments will be performed once before and once after the ECT course. ECT: Each patient will be treated in a min. of 8 bitemporal ECT sessions (~4 weeks). Data analysis: Longitudinal changes in brain imaging parameters and laboratory measures (before/after ECT) will be assessed using repeated-measures analysis of covariance. Machine learning with random forests will be employed to identify a pattern of pretreatment imaging, biochemical (serum and CSF) and clinical parameters that are best qualified to predict response to ECT as defined by a reduction of ≥50% of baseline HAMD17. Hypotheses: 1. ECT will be accompanied by changes in brain morphology, functional connectivity, neuronal activation in response to cognitive and reward-related stimuli and neurochemical signals in the brain. 2. ECT leads to changes in blood- and CSF-based markers of neuronal plasticity, neurodegeneration and inflammation, as well as genetic/epigenetic markers. 3. Predictive markers of ECT response can be established based on the relationships between imaging, neurochemical and clinical markers and treatment response. Innovation: This study would be the first to combine multimodal MRI measures with the assessment of biomarkers in the CSF in the context of ECT. The implementation of the proposed trial represents an important step towards a better understanding of the powerful antidepressant properties of ECT. By relating treatment effects and potentially underlying biological mechanisms on numerous complementary levels, the study might help to identify biomarkers that distinguish patients who are likely to benefit from ECT from non-responders. Ultimately, results of the study might be useful in order to establish an individualized medical indication for ECT.

NCT ID: NCT05630261 Not yet recruiting - Depression Clinical Trials

Transdiagnostic CBT-I on Comorbid Depression and Insomnia

Start date: December 2022
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This randomized control trial (RCT) aims at comparing the efficacy of self-help cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) and self-help cognitive behavioural therapy for depression (CBT-D) on comorbid depression and insomnia. It addresses the research gap of treating comorbid depression and insomnia with a transdiagnostic approach (i.e., CBT-I) rather than a disorder-specific approach (i.e., CBT-D). Insomnia is a transdiagnostic process that is common to many psychiatric disorders. It is not only a symptom for depression, but also a factor that contributes to the onset and maintenance of depression. There were limited studies comparing the efficacy of self-help CBT-I to self-help CBT-D among adults with comorbid insomnia and depression (e.g., Blom, 2015). Hence, this study will serve as one of the pioneering attempts to elucidate the role of self-help transdiagnostic insomnia therapy in reducing depressive symptoms. Prior to all study procedures, eligible participants will be required to complete an online informed consent. Around 100 eligible participants aged between 18 and 65 with a Patient Health Questionnaire-9 score ≥ 10 indicating at least moderate level of depressive symptoms and Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) score ≥ 10 indicating clinical level of insomnia symptoms will be randomly assigned to either Internet-based CBT-I (n = 50) or Internet-based CBT-D (n = 50) in a ratio of 1:1. Eligible participants in the CBT-I group will receive the intervention "iSleepWell" via the a digital mental health platform Next Stop, Wellness! for 6 consecutive weeks, whilst the CBT-D group will receive the intervention 'LIFE FLeX' via the same platform for 6 consecutive weeks. The outcomes of interest include depressive, anxiety, and insomnia symptoms, functional impairment, quality of life, intervention credibility and acceptability at baseline (Week 0), immediate post-treatment (Week 7), and 12 weeks follow-up (Week 19) assessments.