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Infarction clinical trials

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NCT ID: NCT03848429 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Post-Infarction Ventricular Septal Defect

Mechanical Complications of Acute Myocardial Infarction

CAUTION
Start date: March 1, 2019
Phase:
Study type: Observational

Although the incidence of post-AMI mechanical complications has decreased in the last decades, mortality in patients who develop these complications after AMI still remains very high. Because of the rarity of these post-AMI mechanical complications, the optimal evidence-based therapeutic strategies remain controversial, and little is know on the early clinical results and late follow-up. Owing to the paucity and limitation of available data, investigations and analysis are required to help clinicians make an early diagnosis of these devastating complications, and offer to patients the appropriate treatment. "Mechanical complications of acute myocardial infarction: an international multicenter cohort study" (Caution Study 1) is a retrospective, international multicenter clinical trial aimed at evaluating the survival, postoperative outcome and quality of life of patients underwent cardiac surgery for post-AMI mechanical complications.

NCT ID: NCT03841487 Completed - Clinical trials for ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction

Selective Aspiration Thrombectomy in STEMI

Start date: January 1, 2018
Phase:
Study type: Observational

Patients who were diagnosed with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and received primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) from July 2009 to December 2011 were identified from the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan. The investigators compared the 1-year outcomes of patients with STEMI who received aspiration thrombectomy during PPCI vs. those who received PPCI alone.

NCT ID: NCT03840499 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Myocardial Infarction

The Role of Willingness of Participation in Cardiology Trials on the Survival of Patients

Start date: October 1, 2018
Phase:
Study type: Observational [Patient Registry]

It has been shown retrospectively that participation and even the willingness improves the survival of patients after myocardial infarction or heart failure. We aimed to prospectively analyse the role of participation in cardiology trials on the survival of patients in a high volumen tertiary center.

NCT ID: NCT03837535 Recruiting - Myocardial Injury Clinical Trials

Myocardial Infarction in the Perioperative Setting

MIPS
Start date: January 1, 2019
Phase:
Study type: Observational [Patient Registry]

Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is a significant complication following non-cardiac surgery. We sought to evaluate incidence of perioperative AMI, its preoperative and intraoperative risk factors and the outcomes after this complication.

NCT ID: NCT03834155 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Coronary Artery Disease

Enhancing Cardiac Rehabilitation Through Behavioral Nudges

Start date: April 1, 2019
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Adherence to cardiac rehabilitation is poor, and worse for minorities, women, and those with lower levels of education. Patients less likely to be referred to and complete cardiac rehab are at highest risk of adverse outcomes and thus have the most to gain from participation in cardiac rehab. To improve participation, healthcare systems need to limit barriers to enrollment and promote adherence to rehabilitation.

NCT ID: NCT03832153 Recruiting - Clinical trials for STEMI - ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction

Pan-Cardio-Genetics Clot Assessment in Acute Coronary Syndromes

PGCA-ACS
Start date: January 20, 2019
Phase:
Study type: Observational

Acute myocardial infarction with ST elevation (STEMI) is one of the leading causes of mortality. Although the presence of thrombus in STEMI patients has been linked to adverse outcomes, routine thrombus aspiration has not been proven effective. A potential explanation could be that patients with STEMI should be risk-stratified. Thus, a more personalized approach in treating these patients is stressfully required. This proposal aims to establish the required interdisciplinary infrastructure for developing a risk-stratification model by implementing clinical, laboratory and angiographic data with molecular knowledge obtained by using innovative technologies, such as data from nano/micro-Computed tomography and circulating microRNAs. Two hundred consecutive patients with STEMI undergoing thrombus aspiration will be enrolled in the study and will be followed-up for one year for Major Adverse Cardiac and Cerebrovascular events (MACCE). The proposed approach will shed light on the pathophysiological mechanisms and broaden the investigator's understanding of the complex cellular and molecular interactions in the STEMI setting that, along with clinical parameters, affect patient outcomes. Furthermore, it will enable the identification of certain circulating micro-RNAs as cardiovascular disease biomarkers and it will help clinicians to better stratify the cardiovascular and cerebrovascular risk of patients with STEMI. As part of the work, important characteristics of aspirated thrombi will be assessed for the first time (such as volume, density and shape) and will be linked to patient outcomes. All this information will be incorporated into one in-vitro model, which will be developed using bioprinting and microfluidics methodologies. The in-vitro model will facilitate: (i) the in-depth exploration of the pathophysiological mechanisms in patients with STEMI; and (ii) the therapeutic optimization of innovative nanocarriers/nanomedicines with thrombolytic efficacy. Clearly, the study improves personalized cardiovascular medicine approaches, by considering individual patient clinical assessment in a way that empowers the precision in diagnosis and therapy.

NCT ID: NCT03830944 Not yet recruiting - Heart Failure Clinical Trials

Inflammation-mediated Coronary Plaque Vulnerability, Myocardial Viability and Ventricular Remodeling

VIABILITY
Start date: March 1, 2019
Phase:
Study type: Observational

VIABILITY study aims to investigate the link between systemic inflammation, pancoronary plaque vulnerability (referring to the plaque vulnerability within the entire coronary tree), myocardial viability and ventricular remodeling in patients who had suffered a recent ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction (STEMI). The level of systemic inflammation in the acute phase of the myocardial infarction and at 1 month will be assessed on the basis of serum levels of inflammatory biomarkers (hsCRP, matrix metalloproteinases, interleukin-6). Pancoronary plaque vulnerability will be assessed: (1) in the acute phase of the infarction, based on serum biomarkers known to be associated with increased plaque vulnerability, such as adhesion molecules (V-CAM or I-CAM) determined from the blood samples collected in the first day after STEMI; (2) at 1 month after infarction, based on computed tomographic angiography analysis of vulnerability features present in all coronary plaques. Myocardial viability and remodeling will be assessed based on: (1) 3D speckle tracking echocardiography associated with dobutamine infusion; (2) MRI imaging associated with complex post-processing techniques for mapping myocardial fibrosis and scar at the level of left atrium and left ventricle. At the same time, CT imaging features associated with systemic and local inflammation, such as global epicardial fat or local pericoronary epicardial fat will be quantified in order to investigate the impact of inflammatory-mediated plaque vulnerability on the extent of myocardial damage in acute myocardial infarction. All these parameters will be investigated in patients with successful primary revascularization performed in a timely manner for ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction, who will be divided into 2 groups: group 1 - patients who present persistence of an augmented inflammatory status defined as serum levels of hsCRP>3.0 mg/dl at discharge from the hospital or at 7 days postinfarction (whichever comes first), and group 2 - patients with no persistence of augmented inflammatory status (hsCRP<3.0 mg/dl). The primary endpoint of the study will be represented by the rate of post-infarction heart failure development, defined as the rate of re-admission in the hospital for heart failure or by a significant decrease in the ejection fraction (<45%). The secondary endpoints of the study will be: - rate of re-hospitalization - rate of repeated revascularization - rate of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE rate, including cardiovascular death or stroke)

NCT ID: NCT03829605 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Myocardial Infarction

Plasma Hydrogen Sulfide, Nitric Oxide and Stress Hyperglycemia in Acute Myocardial Infarction

Start date: February 15, 2019
Phase:
Study type: Observational

Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) can cause heart failure, an irregular heartbeat, cardiogenic shock, or cardiac arrest. It is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in the general population. The diagnosis of AMI is complex basing on the clinical history, physical examination, cardiac markers, and a chest radiograph. Besides, considering that the mechanisms linking activation of inflammation and ACS are complex as well, progress in diagnosis and therapy improves little

NCT ID: NCT03826836 Not yet recruiting - Heart Failure Clinical Trials

Mind Our Heart Study

Start date: January 2019
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Patients with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (i.e. peripheral artery disease, ischemic heart failure, myocardial infarction) are randomised to (1) treatment as usual (i.e. best medical care) or (2) treatment as usual (i.e. best medical care) in combination with an eight-week mindfulness-based stress reduction programme.

NCT ID: NCT03825679 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Patient With Symptomatic Cerebral Infarction

Association Between the Composition of the Bacterial Flora of Thrombi and the Etiological Origin of Cerebral Infarction Treated With Thrombectomy

Bacillus
Start date: February 2019
Phase:
Study type: Observational

Cerebral infarction is a major health problem. The two most common causes are atherosclerosis (30 to 35%) and cardio-embolic origin (35 to 40%). However, in 25% of cases the cause is undetermined, known as cryptogenic stroke or stroke of undetermined origin. Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation appears to cause a significant proportion of these cryptogenic cerebral infarctions. One of the major challenges in the management of cerebral infarctions is the prevention of recurrence. If the cause is atheromatous, treatment is based on platelet antiaggregants and the correction of cardiovascular risk factors. If the cause is atrial fibrillation, the treatment of choice is anticoagulation therapy. Cryptogenic strokes are managed with antiplatelet therapy. In past studies, the thrombi responsible for cerebral infarctions have been analyzed anatomopathologically to see if the composition of the thrombi could help identify the cause of the cerebral infarction. These studies have proved to be contradictory. The composition of the bacterial flora of cerebral infarct thrombi has not yet been studied, apart from some limited data on septic emboli. In myocardial infarction, the cause of which is almost exclusively atheromatous, bacteria of the periodontal flora have been detected in thrombi of ST-segment elevation infarctions. The causes of cerebral infarction are multiple. The hypotheses explored in this study are that there are differences in the composition of the bacterial flora of the thrombus depending on whether the cause is atheromatous or cardio-embolic and that the study of the composition of the thrombus could be used to identify the cardio-embolic cause in patients with cryptogenic cerebral infarction.