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NCT ID: NCT03236922 Active, not recruiting - Clinical trials for Vesicovaginal Fistula

Autologous Slings With Vesico-Vaginal Fistula Repair

Start date: June 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

It is clear from multiple accounts in the literature that patients with a vesico-vaginal fistula (VVF) involving the bladder neck and/or proximal urethra have a high likelihood of residual incontinence. Performing subsequent surgeries after the initial VVF repair risks additional complications. Therefore, placement of an autologous sling at the time of initial VVF repair would not only assist in covering the fistula, but would also imitate the physiologic support that would theoretically improve urethral function. A rectus fascia sling would most naturally provide this support and warrants testing against the success of the PC sling. Using the Goh scoring criteria, Goh class 3 and 4 VVF's are the type most involving the urethra. Therefore, this group of patients is the target population for this study. As there is currently no standard of care for repairing large urethral defects, this procedural technique combined with otherwise standardized fistula repair would not introduce any foreseeable harm to patients.

NCT ID: NCT03226379 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Cryptococcal Meningitis

Driving Reduced AIDS-associated Meningo-encephalitis Mortality

DREAMM
Start date: April 23, 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

The DREAMM project is investigating whether point of care tests within a diagnostic and treatment algorithm together with support and additional training of laboratory and clinical staff will reduce two and ten week all-cause mortality of HIV-associated meningo-encephalitis in LMICs.

NCT ID: NCT03208725 Recruiting - Sepsis Clinical Trials

Childhood Acute Illness and Nutrition Network

CHAIN
Start date: November 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

The CHAIN Network aims to identify modifiable biomedical and social factors driving the greatly increased risk of mortality among young undernourished children admitted to hospital with acute illness, as inpatients and after discharge. The study will inform priorities, risks and targeting for multi-faceted interventional trials. CHAIN is a multi-centre cohort study with a nested case control analysis of stored biological samples. Study sites are located in Africa and South Asia. Children will be recruited at admission to hospital, stratified by nutritional status. Exposures will be assessed at admission, during hospitalisation, at discharge, and at two time points after discharge. The main outcomes of interest are mortality, re-admission to hospital and failure of nutritional recovery up to 180 days after discharge. To determine community health norms, an additional sample of children living in the same communities will be enrolled and assessed at one time point only.

NCT ID: NCT03208179 Not yet recruiting - Pregnancy Clinical Trials

Improving PRegnancy Outcomes With Intermittent preVEntive Treatment in Africa

IMPROVE
Start date: September 2017
Phase: Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

This study evaluates the efficacy and safety of monthly intermittent preventive treatment using dihydroartemisinin piperaquine (DP) alone or in combination with azithromycin (AZ) compared to sulphadoxine-pyrimthamine (SP) for the prevention of malaria in pregnant women in the second and third trimester.

NCT ID: NCT03206125 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

NCI UNC Project ESCC

Start date: August 23, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

Background: Esophageal cancer is a common cause of cancer deaths. Most cases of this cancer are esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Many of these cases come from two parts of the world with high-risk. One of these is in East Africa and include the country of Malawi. Researchers want to learn what factors explain the high risk there so we can understand better what causes this cancer in people everywhere. Objective: To learn more about causes and outcomes of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma using Malawi because of the large number of cases in that country. Eligibility: Adults at least 18 years old who have ESCC and live in a certain region of Malawi Adults in the same age group and location who do not have ESCC Design: Participants will be screened at a hospital in Malawi. Participants will have a 1-hour interview. They will answer questions about: Demographics (age, ethnicity, education) Place of residence Medical history and family medical history Drug, alcohol, and tobacco use Hot beverage consumption Indoor air pollution Occupation Food habits Farming Gastrointestinal health Participants will have their teeth and fingernails examined. Participants will be asked to give samples of blood, urine, saliva, toenails, and for the cancer cases, a small piece of their tumor. Participants will have 4 phone calls a year for 2 years to ask about their health.

NCT ID: NCT03201510 Active, not recruiting - HIV Clinical Trials

Feasibility of HIV Prevention Cohort Studies Among Men Who Have Sex With Men in Sub-Saharan Africa

Start date: July 2015
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

This study aims to determine the feasibility of recruiting and retaining men who have sex with men (MSM) in a multi-country prospective cohort study in preparation for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention studies in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA).

NCT ID: NCT03160209 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

HIV and Other Risk Factors for Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma in Malawi

Start date: June 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

The primary purpose of this single-center, case-control, non-interventional study is to determine risk factors which contribute to the development of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) at Kamuzu Central Hospital (KCH) in Malawi.

NCT ID: NCT03160183 Recruiting - HIV Clinical Trials

Investigating Chemotherapy Treatments, Response and Subsets of HIV-associated Kaposi Sarcoma in Malawi

Start date: September 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

The purpose of this study is to identify important associations between complete and comprehensive clinical, laboratory, and genomic data derived from patients and tumor specimens, with prospectively recorded clinical outcomes. The investigators also hope to move beyond simple risk factor associations as previously described, to develop a composite score specifically for KS recurrence or progression, analogous to widely used risk scores that are used to direct up-front treatment of other cancers. In so doing, the investigators will draw on extremely granular data to prospectively identify patients who are most likely to benefit from new treatments.

NCT ID: NCT03153709 Not yet recruiting - HIV Infections Clinical Trials

Prospective Cohort Evaluating Pregnancy Rates, PK Interactions Among HIV+ Women on EFV Initiating LNG Implant or DMPA

FP-ART
Start date: June 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

The purpose of this study is to compare the pregnancy rates among women who are using the HIV drug Efavirenz and either the birth control injection or implant.

NCT ID: NCT03136393 Active, not recruiting - Clinical trials for Maternal Exposure During Pregnancy

Effect of Dietary Counseling During Pregnancy on Infant Birthweight in Mangochi , Malawi

Start date: November 1, 2015
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

High neonatal mortality rates accounts for a substantial early loss of lives in Malawi; and has thus been a hindrance for Malawi to eradicate child deaths. From 2000 to 2011, Malawi achieved an overall reduction of 23% in under-five child mortality. The reduction was more substantial between the second and the fifth year of life, being 28%. However, in the neonatal period the reduction was half, at 14%. Neonatal deaths in developing countries are due to prematurity or low birth weight, neonatal infections, birth trauma related conditions and congenital anomalies. Being of low birth weight increases the risk of death four fold in the neonatal period. Even when low birth weight infants survive, their poorly developed immune function exposes them to increased morbidity in early life. Maternal nutrition represents by far the greatest influence among pregnancy environmental on birth weight in low income countries. There is strong evidence that health and dietary counselling is effective in improving child nutrition outcomes. Thus we propose to test the effectiveness in improving birth weight by a low cost intervention, community based health and nutrition counselling delivered to mothers during pregnancy in Malawi. On the other hand, in the Malawian context offering individualized dietetic counselling could be impeded by the healthcare workforce short fall. Currently the health workforce does not include dieticians . The use of lay health workers (LHW) has been identified as one of the effective strategies to meet the health workforce shortage challenges in low resource settings. It is on this basis that a study was planned, aimed at developing lay health worker delivered community based nutrition counselling to mothers during pregnancy and measuring its effectiveness in improving birth weight in the Malawian context. The study was comprised of an initial i) formative study, followed by ii) a cross-sectional survey. Findings of these two sub-studies were utilized to develop a nutrition counselling intervention. Finally iii) a cluster Randomized Controlled Trial (cRCT) aimed at measuring the effect of the intervention on birth size (weight, length, arm and abdominal circumferences) will now be conducted which is being elaborated in this protocol.