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Pregnancy Related clinical trials

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NCT ID: NCT03583216 Not yet recruiting - Pregnancy Related Clinical Trials

Comparison of Factor XII Levels in Gestational Diabetic and Healthy Pregnancies

Start date: July 5, 2018
Phase:
Study type: Observational

To compare Factor XII levels in gestational diabetic and healthy pregnancies.

NCT ID: NCT03575286 Recruiting - Pregnancy Related Clinical Trials

Feasibility Study of an Automated Point-of-Care Urine Diagnostic Device for Pregnancy

Start date: June 28, 2018
Phase:
Study type: Observational

The primary purpose of this observational study is to demonstrate the feasibility of an automated point-of-care urine diagnostic device in determining the pregnancy status of patients through urine samples collected from patients at Northwestern University. Our hypothesis is that this automated point-of-care urine diagnostic device will be able to accurately determine a patient's pregnancy status at least 95% of the time.

NCT ID: NCT03555799 Recruiting - Pregnancy Related Clinical Trials

Evaluation of Changes of Venous Return After Spinal and Epidural Analgesia and Anesthesia by Ultrasound Guided Vena Cava Diameter Measurement

Start date: May 18, 2018
Phase:
Study type: Observational

We propose this study to test the hypotheses that inferior vena cava (IVC) diameter can predict hypotension after labor analgesia (epidural, combined spinal-epidural) and neuraxial anesthesia for cesarean section (epidural, combined spinal-epidural and spinal block) in full-term pregnant patients.

NCT ID: NCT03555604 Recruiting - Pregnancy Related Clinical Trials

Evaluation of the Effect of Body Mass Index on Gastric Volume With Ultrasound in Term Pregnant Women

Start date: May 29, 2018
Phase:
Study type: Observational

This study seeks to determine if a relationship exists between gastric antrum cross-sectional area measured using ultrasound and BMI in term pregnant women (>37 weeks gestation).

NCT ID: NCT03552120 Enrolling by invitation - Pregnancy Related Clinical Trials

Serving Women Using Opioids During Pregnancy

SWOOP
Start date: April 23, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of Mindfulness-Oriented Recovery Enhancement (MORE) on opioid misuse and parenting behavior among pregnant women using opioids. Specific aims are: AIM 1: To evaluate the preliminary efficacy of MORE, relative to a supportive counseling control condition, on primary outcomes (opioid misuse) and secondary outcomes (opioid craving, psychological distress) among pregnant women using opioids. Hypothesis: Participants who participate in MORE will demonstrate significantly greater improvements than the supportive visit control group on: opioid misuse behaviors, opioid craving, and psychological distress. AIM 2: To test and quantify the degree to which the impact of MORE on opioid misuse is mediated by changes in cognitive, affective, and autonomic mechanisms relevant to this clinical population - including opioid attentional bias, negative emotion regulation, reward responsiveness, and physiological reactivity to infant cues. Hypothesis: The impact of MORE on craving and opioid misuse behaviors will be mediated by improvements in attentional bias toward opioid cues, negative emotion regulation and natural reward responsiveness on the emotion regulation task, and autonomic reactivity to infant cues. AIM 3: To evaluate the impact of MORE on mothers' perceptions of their ability to parent effectively and the quality of the mother-baby relationship. Hypothesis: Participants participating in MORE will report more positive beliefs about their ability to effectively parent. Participants who participated in MORE will interact more sensitively with their newborn. Exploratory AIM 1: To evaluate the efficacy of MORE, relative to a support group control condition, on co-regulation, as measured by an index of sympathetic nervous system functioning, among pregnant women using opioids. Hypothesis 1: Dyads in which the mother participated in MORE will demonstrate significantly greater dyadic synching of sympathetic activity as measured by respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA). Exploratory AIM 2: To test and quantify the degree to which the impact of MORE on dyadic synchrony (during the Still Face Paradigm) is mediated by changes in negative emotion regulation and reward responsiveness. Hypothesis 2: The impact of MORE on dyadic synchrony will be mediated by improvements in negative emotion regulation and natural reward responsiveness as measured by an emotion regulation task.

NCT ID: NCT03551054 Completed - Pregnancy Related Clinical Trials

Healthy for Two, Healthy for You

H42/H4U
Start date: July 22, 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Investigators conducted a pilot feasibility and acceptability randomized controlled trial of a remotely delivered behavioral health coaching program in pregnancy and postpartum.

NCT ID: NCT03536689 Recruiting - Pregnancy Related Clinical Trials

Comparison of Amniotic Fluid Index Between Before and After Maternal Position Change in Upright and Left Lateral Decubitus Position

Start date: February 20, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Comparison of amniotic fluid index between before and after maternal position change in Upright and left lateral decubitus maternal position

NCT ID: NCT03528655 Not yet recruiting - Pregnancy Related Clinical Trials

Influence of Decision Aids on the Choice of Mother-infant Rooming-in or Separation Care for Pregnant Women

Start date: May 15, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

During early postpartum period, mother-infant proximity is important for breastfeeding success. Rooming-in and separate care are both traditional practices. Rooming-in involves keeping the mother and the baby together in the same room after birth during hospitalization, whereas separate care keeps the baby in the hospital baby room. Shared decision making with decision aid (DA) is a way to provide information to pregnant women and to involve them in making decisions about their strategy on baby care. We have developed a DA to be administered during consultation for pregnant women, and conducted a randomized controlled trial (RCT) to evaluate the benefit of DA on decision making. The measurements include a battery of interview-based questionnaires and evaluations of decision regret. We expect the DA would benefit the intervention group in the aspects of knowledge and communication in choosing mother-baby care options.

NCT ID: NCT03518463 Completed - Pregnancy Related Clinical Trials

Enhanced Recovery After Surgery for Emergency Caesarean Deliveries

ERAS-Mbarara
Start date: June 20, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Caesarean section (CS) constitutes a large proportion of the total surgical volume in low-income countries. This rate comes with challenges including surgical complications, shortage of beds, and consequently long waiting time for operations and high costs. These have led to the adoption of ERAS in developed countries in a bid to save costs by reducing hospital length of stay without compromising the health of the mother and her baby.

NCT ID: NCT03504319 Recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

The Role of Physical Activity During Pregnancy on Metabolic Function, Inflammation, and Maternal and Neonatal Outcomes

Start date: May 1, 2016
Phase:
Study type: Observational

Maternal obesity during pregnancy is a serious public health concern as it contributes to inflammation, insulin resistance, and excessive gestational weight gain- all of which negatively impact maternal and neonatal health. Fortunately, physical activity during pregnancy improves obstetric and infant outcomes associated with obesity. Specifically, data from our group demonstrated that irrespective of body weight, women who were physically-active during pregnancy had lower levels of systemic inflammation; however, the mechanism/s driving these changes are poorly understood. Previous studies in non-gravid populations suggest obesity-associated overnutrition may contribute to inflammation and this subsequent inflammation may lead to further metabolic dysfunction- perpetuating a vicious cycle. However, the connections between physical activity, inflammation, and metabolic dysfunction (i.e. metabolic inflexibility), particularly in response to a high-fat meal (similar to that which is typically consumed in a Western diet), among lean and obese pregnant women have not been studied. Thus, this study will examine the impact of a physically-active lifestyle on inflammatory and metabolic responses to a high-fat meal in lean and obese pregnant women. Understanding mechanisms connecting maternal physical activity to improved outcomes will better inform future targeted intervention strategies. The goal of this study is to determine the role of a physically-active lifestyle during pregnancy on metabolic function and inflammation following a high-fat meal in lean and obese pregnant women.