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NCT ID: NCT03316872 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

Study of Pembrolizumab and Radiotherapy in Liver Cancer

Start date: November 1, 2017
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This is a phase 2 study whose purpose is to assess the efficacy of the combination of pembrolizumab and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) who have experienced disease progression after treatment with sorafenib.

NCT ID: NCT03316092 Completed - Clinical trials for Oral Hydroxychloroquine Ocular Toxicity

Monitoring and Preventing Hydroxychloroquine, Plaquenil, Toxicity.

Start date: January 7, 2010
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

Oral Hydoxychloroquine is a very popular medication widely used by patients with rheumatoid arthritis, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and other diseases. Ocular side effects of this medication are very serious and causes loss of central vision. In most patients these side effects are dose related, cumulative. This means that the risk of side effects would increase in all patients with continued use of the medication. In few people use of the medication would not be recommended if they have some bilateral macular problems. This is because the side effects of this medication does cause serious degredation of the macula in both eyes.

NCT ID: NCT03315247 Not yet recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

Tele-CBT Following Bariatric Surgery: Randomized Control Trial

Start date: November 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Bariatric (weight loss) surgery is the most effective treatment for extreme obesity, but surgery does not treat underlying psychological and behavioural issues. Currently, psychotherapy ("talk therapy") for eating problems is not routinely offered with surgery, and many people start to regain weight one year later. Objective: This study will examine if adding a convenient and accessible psychotherapy by phone one year after surgery will lead to increased weight loss two years after surgery. Primary Hypothesis: Relative to the Control group (who will get routine care), the group of individuals who get psychotherapy will have lower weights 2 years after surgery. Secondary Hypotheses: Relative to the Control group, the psychotherapy group will report significantly less maladaptive eating behaviours and medical burden, and significantly greater quality of life. Method: Participants recruited from the Bariatric Surgery Programs at Toronto Western Hospital will be randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups: 1) Control (Usual Standard of Care) or 2) Tele-CBT (a 7-session telephone-based cognitive behavioural therapy [a type of "talk therapy"] intervention focused on developing coping skills to improve maladaptive thoughts, emotions, and eating behaviours, specifically designed for bariatric surgery patients, delivered 1 year post-surgery). They will have their weight measured and will complete measures of eating behaviour and quality of life prior to the intervention, and again at several time points extending to 2 years post-surgery. Implications: If Telephone-Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) is found to improve bariatric surgery outcomes, it could become the standard of care in Canadian bariatric surgery programs and beyond, and be routinely offered to patients who cannot feasibly attend CBT sessions due to physical or practical barriers.

NCT ID: NCT03315000 Recruiting - Asthma Clinical Trials

Effect of Vilanterol on Methacholine Challenge Results

Start date: October 13, 2017
Phase: Phase 4
Study type: Interventional

The study will assess the degree of bronchoprotection provided by the ultra long-acting beta2 agonist vilanterol against methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction.

NCT ID: NCT03314428 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Osteoarthritis, Knee

Gait Retraining for Runners With Knee Osteoarthritis

Start date: January 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Tibiofemoral osteoarthritis (TFOA) is highly prevalent in older adults, and often causes symptoms and functional limitations. Physical activity is widely advocated in people with TFOA, and running is an easy and accessible activity that provides many benefits on general health. However, running induces high knee loads, which could potentially contribute to symptoms of runners with TFOA. Previous studies have suggested that running gait modifications can help in decreasing symptoms and knee loading in runners with knee conditions. Yet, no study has been conducted in runners with TFOA. This intervention study will investigate the effects of a 4-week running gait retraining program on symptoms and running biomechanics in runners with TFOA. We hypothesize that running modifications will decrease symptoms, improve function and reduce knee loading.

NCT ID: NCT03314025 Recruiting - Urinary Retention Clinical Trials

Prophylactic Tamsulosin in Prevention of Post-operative Urinary Retention in Men After Transanal Endoscopic Microsurgery

TEMPOUR
Start date: October 6, 2017
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

Post-operative urinary retention (POUR) is a frequent complication reported as ranging from 10 to 55% in the literature. In a recent retrospective study from Laliberte et al in Quebec City, we observed that 19% of the patients operated using transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) had a post-operative urinary retention (POUR). Factors related to the patient, the tumor and the surgery were not observed to be associated risk factors. Tamsulosin has been shown as an effective preventive agent of POUR for certain ano-rectal and inguinal surgeries. The efficacy of this prophylactic therapy in transanal endoscopic microsurgery has not been studied yet and is unclear considering the particularities of this procedure. TEM uses a rigid proctoscope of four centimeters of diameter and creates a continuous pneumorectum (insufflation of the rectum during all the procedure). We think that these two elements, which cause local inflammation, may be part of the reason explaining the high incidence of post-operative urinary retention after TEM procedures. The objective of our multicenter clinical trial is to evaluate the effect of perioperative tamsulosin for the reduction of POUR in men, as well as the impact on the interventions and hospital admissions related to this complication.

NCT ID: NCT03313674 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Major Depressive Disorder

Investigation of Seasonal Variations of Brain Structure and Connectivity in SAD

Start date: November 1, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) is a subtype of Major Depressive Disorder, characterized by a recurrent temporal relationship between the season of year, the onset and the remission of a major depressive episode. Estimates of the annual prevalence state that 1-6% of the population will develop SAD with the larger prevalences found at greater extremes in latitude. SAD is most likely triggered by the shortening photoperiod experienced in the winter months leading to a deterioration of mood. Recent cross-sectional neuroimaging studies have found cellular and neurotransmitter changes in response to seasonality, ultimately having an impact on the affect of patients. Conversly, this study aims to investigate the changes in neurocircuitry related to depression and euthymic states. Patients with SAD offer a unique ability to study these changes since they have predictable triggers for the onset of depression (i.e. the winter months) and remission (i.e. the summer months).

NCT ID: NCT03313388 Recruiting - Muscle Damage Clinical Trials

Tart Cherry Juice for Exercise Performance and Recovery

Start date: October 1, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This study evaluates the effects of tart cherry juice consumption on endurance exercise performance, fat metabolism during exercise, blood pressure, and recovery from exercise as assessed by muscle pain, muscle strength and electrical properties of muscle. Comparisons will be made to Gatorade consumption. Participants include those who are moderately active and have experience with cycling.

NCT ID: NCT03313258 Not yet recruiting - Trauma Clinical Trials

Zero Heat Flux Temp Monitor on Discharge Hypothermia Among Trauma Patients (RUZIT Trial)

RUZIT
Start date: February 1, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Hypothermia amongst trauma patients is a persistent problem that increases the relative risk of transfusion as well as morbidity and mortality. The investigators propose to conduct a single-centered randomized controlled trial to determine if the use of a zero-heat flux (ZHF) temperature monitor can reduce the incidence of hypothermia amongst trauma patients discharged from the trauma bay (TB). All eligible trauma patients will be randomized to either a standard of care group or an active temperature monitoring group. In the active temperature monitoring group, a ZHF monitor will be placed on respective trauma patients to continuously record their temperatures after they enter the TB at a large tertiary trauma centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre (SHSC), in Toronto, ON. The investigators will determine if early continuous temperature monitoring can reduce the incidence of hypothermia upon discharge from the TB. Should early monitoring of severely injured trauma patients within the hospital improves discharge temperature, the foundation for two additional research studies will be laid. Firstly, the investigators will enter a vanguard phase of this trial and assess if early warming patients can improve morbidity and mortality in this patient population utilizing a multi-centered randomized controlled trial design. This will be further extended to test whether early monitoring can be applied in a pre-hospital setting (i.e. within ambulances and transport vehicles) to improve admission temperatures in the TB.

NCT ID: NCT03312829 Completed - Critical Illness Clinical Trials

FINDpath: Fast I(n)Dentification of PATHogens

FINDpath
Start date: May 2014
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

Sepsis is the body-wide response to infection. People who develop sepsis have an increased risk of dying. One of the greatest challenges in sepsis is determining what is the pathogen (bacteria or virus for example) in a timely manner so the most specific antibiotics can be given to treat the infection. Patients presenting to the hospital and the intensive care unit often have lung infections. In this study the investigators plan to develop new techniques to rapidly (less than 6 hours) identify bacteria growing in the airways of patients on ventilators. The investigators will obtain these samples by suctioning the airways (a routine procedure) and comparing the bacterial cultures grown by novel culture media with the usual techniques in the hospital microbiology laboratory. At the same time the investigators will collect a blood sample. This blood sample will be used to isolate the bacterial genetic material and use this to compare with bacteria grown on the culture media from the clinical and the research laboratory. The investigators will also collect information on the patient's course in hospital. These pilot study results will allow us to integrate this new technique into routine patient care.