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Heart Disease clinical trials

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NCT ID: NCT05484882 Recruiting - Heart Disease Clinical Trials

Genomics, Environmental Factors and Social Determinants of Cardiovascular Disease in African-Americans Study (GENE-FORECAST): Prospective COVID-19 Natural History Study

Start date: August 10, 2022
Phase:
Study type: Observational

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic infected and killed African Americans at higher rates than other Americans. Researchers want to understand why. Objective: This natural history study will look at how genetic, environmental, and social factors may predict or affect COVID-19 in African Americans. Information from this study will be combined with data from the GENE-FORECAST study. Eligibility: African Americans who were previously enrolled in GENE-FORECAST. Design: The study includes a telephone interview and 1 visit to the NIH clinic. Participants may engage in either one or both of these activities. The telephone interview will last 20 minutes. Participants will talk about their experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic. The clinic visit will last up to 4 hours. Participants will have a physical exam. They will have blood and urine tests. They will be tested for COVID-19. A long swab will be inserted into a nostril to get a fluid sample from the back of the nose. They will have noninvasive tests of their blood vessels. One device used is a pen-like probe placed lightly on the wrist. Another is a rubber sleeve placed around a finger while a blood pressure cuff is used on the arm. Participants will have a test to measure the electrical activity in their heart. Stickers attached to wires will be placed on their chest, arms, and legs. Participants will answer more questions about COVID-19. They will talk about their health behavior. They will talk about their family s health and the neighborhood they live in. Other questions will ask how they feel, live, work, and play.

NCT ID: NCT05461495 Not yet recruiting - Diabetes Clinical Trials

NYUCI-ES: Psychosocial Intervention to Improve Health Outcomes for Chinese and Korean ADRD Caregivers

Start date: October 1, 2022
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This study will conduct a two-arm randomized controlled trial to test the efficacy of a culturally tailored version of the NYU Caregiver Intervention (NYUCI) plus enhanced support (ES) through online chat groups (the NYUCI plus WeChat/Kakaotalk [population social media app for Chinese/Korean] peer support which we call the NYUCI-ES in reducing health risks for cardiometabolic disease among older Chinese and Korean American adults caring for relatives with ADRD. In collaboration with community organizations across the New York and northern New Jersey metropolitan area, we will enroll 300 caregivers of people with ADRD (150 Chinese and 150 Korean) in this study. Aim 1: Develop culturally adapted informational and educational materials about dementia and caregiving issues for social service providers of the intervention and for family caregivers. Aim 2: Test the hypothesis, H1: A counseling and support intervention (the NYUCI-ES) will significantly improve psychosocial factors such as depression, stress self-rated health and chronic disease management among Chinese and Korean-American ADRD caregivers and these changes will be mediated by improvement in social support. H1a: By the first (6- month) follow-up, the mediators (increases in social support, stress reaction) will improve significantly in the intervention group compared to baseline values and the control group. H1b: These improvements will be maintained, and lead to reduction in depressive symptoms, and improvement in self-reported health and chronic disease self-management by the 12-month follow-up compared to the control group. Aim 3: Test the hypothesis, H2: the NYUCI-ES will reduce biologic risk factors, including metabolic health (glycosylated hemoglobin) and inflammation (Oxidative stress, lipid metabolism, etc.) within 6 months of enrollment compared to baseline and a control group; these changes will be mediated through increases in social support and decreases in depressive symptoms and will be maintained at the 12-month follow-up. The public health significance of these findings will likely have an impact on health care policy for CGs from diverse underserved ethnic and cultural backgrounds, potentially reducing morbidity, and improving their quality of life.

NCT ID: NCT05153967 Not yet recruiting - Sickle Cell Disease Clinical Trials

Cooperative Assessment of Late Effects for SCD Curative Therapies

COALESCE
Start date: July 29, 2022
Phase:
Study type: Observational

Sickle Cell Disease is one of the most common genetic diseases in the United States, occurring in approximately 1 in 400 births. Approximately 100,000 individuals are diagnosed with SCD in the United States. Mortality for children with SCD has decreased substantially over the past 4 decades, with >99% of those born in high resource settings, including the United States, France, and England, now surviving to 18 years of age. However, the life expectancy of adults with SCD is severely shortened. Dysfunction of the heart, lung, and kidney is directly associated with decreased life expectancy. With the variety of curative therapies that are now available for SCD, long-term health outcomes studies are time-sensitive. As of now, efforts to determine long-term health outcomes following curative therapies for SCD have been limited. Though curative therapies initially should provide a cure for symptoms of SCD, there is the risk of late health outcomes to consider. Defining health outcomes following curative therapy is essential to improve personalized decision-making when considering curative versus disease-modifying therapeutic options. The primary goal of this study is to determine whether curative therapies for individuals with SCD will result in improved or worsening heart, lung, and kidney damage when compared to individuals with SCD receiving standard therapy. The investigators will also explore whether certain genes are associated with a good or bad outcome after curative therapy for SCD.

NCT ID: NCT04767061 Recruiting - Heart Failure Clinical Trials

Impact of Beta-blockers on Physical Function in HFpEF

Start date: April 1, 2021
Phase: Phase 4
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of this study is to understand the impact of beta-blockers on physical function in older adults with heart failure. We will achieve this objective by conducting N-of-1 trials. N-of-1 trials are personalized experiments that test different treatment options in an individual patient.

NCT ID: NCT04757584 Recruiting - Heart Failure Clinical Trials

Pilot Deprescribing N-of-1 Trials for Beta-blockers in HFpEF

Start date: April 1, 2021
Phase: Phase 4
Study type: Interventional

In this study, we will test the feasibility of N-of-1 trials for deprescribing beta-blockers in patients with Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction. To achieve this objective we will conduct 16 4-period N-of-1 trials (on vs. off) and subsequently interview participants to better understand feasibility and pragmatism. The N-of-1 trials will be iteratively refined in real-time based on this feedback.

NCT ID: NCT04462315 Completed - Clinical trials for Cardiovascular Diseases

10-Years Follow-up of the EXAMINATION Trial

EXAMINAT10N
Start date: May 1, 2015
Phase:
Study type: Observational

The EXAMINATION trial was a superiority trial that compared everolimus-eluting stents (EES) versus bare-metal stents (BMS) in an all-comer ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) population. The patient-oriented endpoint was not superior at 1-year, but it was at 5-year. However, very-long term follow-up is unknown. The study had an independent Clinical event Committee (CEC). All events were adjudicated by an independent clinical committee, according to the Academic Research Consortium 1.

NCT ID: NCT03835169 Active, not recruiting - Clinical trials for Acute Coronary Syndrome

Intra Hospital Mortality Risk Factors in Patients Admitted to Cardiac Intensive Care Units in 2017 in France

USIC -BNAT
Start date: January 24, 2019
Phase:
Study type: Observational

Retrospective, observational cohort study. Objectives: To identify intra hospital mortality risk factors in patients admitted admitted to cardiac intensive care units (CICU). The clinical main endpoint will be the observed percentage of deaths that occured during the year 2017 in french CICU. To identify the length of stay key determiners of patients admitted in french CICU. The study will use data from one of the french nationwide healthcare systems database (SNDS) : the national hospital discharge database (PMSI) to be precise.

NCT ID: NCT03820752 Completed - Diabetes Clinical Trials

Vaccination Coverage and Level of Protection in Patients at Risk

Start date: October 2014
Phase:
Study type: Observational

The purpose of this study is to determine 1. vaccination coverage of recommended vaccines (routine childhood vaccines and vaccines against seasonal flu and pneumococci) in children with chronic diseases (allergy, cystic fibrosis, diabetes mellitus type 1, congenital heart disease, immunocompromised and solid organ transplant patients) 2. the level of protection against measles, mumps, rubella and pertussis in children with chronic diseases. 3. vaccination coverage of recommended vaccines (diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis and vaccines against seasonal flu and pneumococci) in adults with chronic diseases (nephropathy, diabetes mellitus, COPD, heart failure, HIV and solid organ transplant patients) 4. the level of protection against diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis in adults with chronic diseases.

NCT ID: NCT03579641 Completed - Heart Failure Clinical Trials

Precision Event Monitoring for Patients With Heart Failure Using HeartLogic

PREEMPT-HF
Start date: June 1, 2018
Phase:
Study type: Observational

The goal of the PREEMPT-HF study is to collect device and clinical event data to evaluate extended applications of the HeartLogic Heart Failure Diagnostic (HeartLogic) in a broad spectrum of heart failure patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator or cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillator. There are no primary safety and/or efficacy endpoints for this study. Heart failure is a complex clinical syndrome with high morbidity, mortality, and economic burden. Chronic Heart Failure is persistent, gradually progressive, and punctuated by episodes of acute worsening leading to hospitalizations. Therefore, there remains an unmet clinical need to slow the progression of Heart Failure and prevent hospitalizations. HeartLogic, available in Boston Scientific cardiac resynchronization therapy devices and defibrillators, combines novel sensor parameters such as heart sounds and respiration with other measurements like thoracic impedance, heart rate, and activity into a HeartLogic Index for the early detection of worsening Heart Failure. However, there is limited data on the association of HeartLogic with the risk of Hear Failure readmissions and tachyarrhythmias, or for phenotyping the broad spectrum of Heart Failure patients.

NCT ID: NCT03481322 Completed - Heart Disease Clinical Trials

Low Sodium Cooking Study

Start date: September 5, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the acceptance of a salt restricted diet cooked with a controlled amount of salt in patients with heart disease. Verifying if there is difference in the acceptance of the standard and hyposodic diets cooked with controlled amount of salt.