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Colorectal Cancer clinical trials

View clinical trials related to Colorectal Cancer.

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NCT ID: NCT05693519 Active, not recruiting - Colorectal Cancer Clinical Trials

GastroIntestinal Cancer in Children and Adolescents

GICCA
Start date: December 22, 2022
Phase:
Study type: Observational

The goal of this observational population-based cohort study is to investigate the clinical characteristics and outcomes of children and adolescents with primary gastrointestinal malignancies registered in the publicly available Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) 17 database during 2000-2019.

NCT ID: NCT05638542 Active, not recruiting - Colorectal Cancer Clinical Trials

Comparison of Expression of Carcinogenesis-related Molecular Markers in the Patients With Colon Cancer and Polyp

Start date: March 1, 2015
Phase:
Study type: Observational

A study of carcinogenesis-related molecular markers in the patients with colorectal cancer and colorectal adenoma.

NCT ID: NCT05511688 Active, not recruiting - Colorectal Cancer Clinical Trials

National Cohort of Colorectal Cancers With Microsatellite Instability

Start date: March 22, 2017
Phase:
Study type: Observational

The three main pathways of colorectal carcinogenesis are chromosomal instability, microsatellite instability (MSI) (15% of colorectal cancers =CRCs) and CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP). MSI CRCs are associated with a better prognosis after curative surgery than CRCs without microsatellite instability (MSS). In contrast, MSI CRCs do not appear to benefit from adjuvant 5-FU chemotherapy, unlike patients with MSS CRCs. Nevertheless, the benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy with FOLFOX seems to be retained. The identification of prognostic markers in this subgroup of patients is therefore essential to decide on adjuvant chemotherapy, the efficacy of which is currently debated in MSI CRC. To date, there are very few data concerning metastatic MSI CRC. Metastatic forms are rare (about 5% of metastatic CRCs), but are thought to be associated with chemoresistance and poor prognosis. Nevertheless, data are very sparse and there are no data regarding the use of modern chemotherapies and targeted therapies in metastatic MSI CRC. Thus, it is important to characterize the chemosensitivity of metastatic forms. Clinical predictors of recurrence after curative CRC surgery are known but have only been studied in MSI CRC retrospectively. Similarly, many molecular and immunohistochemical factors, prognostic or predictive of response to adjuvant chemotherapy, have been recently identified in CRC (KRAS, BRAF, TP53, PI3KCA mutations, CIMP phenotype, SMAD4, immune response...). Most of these markers have been studied in all CRCs, but not specifically in the MSI CRC subgroup. All these prognostic and/or predictive biomarkers need to be better characterized in a large cohort of MSI CRCs.

NCT ID: NCT05445570 Active, not recruiting - Colorectal Cancer Clinical Trials

Non-invasive Identification of Colorectal Cancer and Adenomas in Early Stages

NICE
Start date: May 13, 2022
Phase:
Study type: Observational

The NICE study is a prospective, multi-site study to train and validate a blood-based, glycoproteomic test for the early detection of advanced adenoma and colorectal cancer by collecting blood samples and associated relevant clinical information from average-risk participants who undergo routine screening colonoscopy as well as participants undergoing colonoscopy for surveillance or diagnostic indications

NCT ID: NCT05408169 Active, not recruiting - Colorectal Cancer Clinical Trials

Increasing Uptake of Bowel Screening

TEMPO
Start date: June 20, 2022
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Bowel cancer is the second biggest cancer killer in the UK, accounting for over 16,000 deaths per year. Screening can reduce deaths from bowel cancer if the people invited participate. The challenge is that high uptake of bowel screening is hard to achieve, and remains persistently below 65%. The faecal immunochemical test (FIT) is the most widely used bowel screening test worldwide. In the UK, FIT kits are mailed to people's homes without guidance on when the kit should be returned and only brief instruction on how to use it. Some people have said that even though they intend to complete and return the kit, they often forget or put off doing it. Two approaches are proposed to addressing this issue: i) providing a suggested deadline for FIT return, because it is known from breast and cervical cancer screening that giving people an appointment time increases uptake compared to an open invitation, and ii) planning sheets, that have been found to help people act on their intentions in other health contexts. This trial aims to evaluate the impact of providing a suggested deadline and a planning sheet on the return of FIT bowel screening kits. The trial is integrated within the Scottish Bowel Screening Programme. The investigators will randomly allocate 40,000 consecutive people that are due to be sent a FIT kit to one of eight groups: (i) control group (no deadline, no planning sheet), (ii) intervention group (1-week deadline, no planning sheet), (iii) intervention group (2-week deadline, no planning sheet), (iv) intervention group (4-week deadline, no planning sheet), (v) intervention group (no deadline, with planning sheet), (vi) intervention group (1-week deadline, with planning sheet), (vii) intervention group (2-week deadline, with planning sheet), (viii) intervention group (4-week deadline, with planning sheet). It will then be examined if having a suggested deadline and a planning sheet affects how many people send back their completed FIT kit. It will also be examined if the deadline length makes a difference and whether having both a deadline and a planning sheet affects the number of people returning their kit. Finally, the cognitive and behavioural mechanisms underlying any intervention effects will be assessed and the acceptability of the interventions explored, using questionnaires and in-depth interviews.

NCT ID: NCT05387876 Active, not recruiting - Colorectal Cancer Clinical Trials

Vitamin D Intervention and Associated Changes in the Gut Microbiome and Vitamin D Levels in Healthy Adults

VDMT
Start date: February 14, 2022
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Although dietary vitamin D supplementation has been used in the clinical setting for decades, the effect of supplementary vitamin D consumption on the structure of the microbiome has not been studied in humans in fine scale or with concomitant adjustment for dietary intake. Understanding the interaction of vitamin D with the microbiome in humans could lead to important advancements in the understanding of how vitamin D together with diet impacts the microbiome composition, and ultimately, risk of EOCRC. This study has the potential to lay the ground work for an adjunctive therapy to manipulate the microbiome to reduce risk of EOCRC. This proposed study is designed to evaluate the effect of vitamin D supplementation on the normal structure of the microbiome and data will not be used to diagnose, prevent, cure or treat disease.

NCT ID: NCT05348187 Active, not recruiting - Colorectal Cancer Clinical Trials

Clinical Performance Study Protocol for Therascreen® KRAS RGQ PCR Kit

Start date: July 1, 2019
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

An interventional, prospective clinical performance study protocol, for the testing of DNA extracted from tumor tissue biopsy samples, using the therascreen® KRAS RGQ PCR Kit, from patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and Colorectal Cancer, screened in Amgen's clinical trial (Protocol No. 20170543).

NCT ID: NCT05281159 Active, not recruiting - Colorectal Cancer Clinical Trials

Increasing Engagement With Messages Regarding CRC Screening Among Adults Aged 45-49

CRC45+TEXT
Start date: February 21, 2022
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

In May of 2021, the United States Preventive Service Task Force (USPSTF) updated their colorectal cancer (CRC) screening guidelines by recommending screening at an earlier age for average-risk adults starting at the age of 45 years old (Grade B recommendation). This is in addition to their Grade A recommendations of continuing to screen average-risk adults ages 50-75 years old. As the investigators health system aims to screen the newly eligible population of average-risk patients between the ages of 45-49, the investigators proposed randomized controlled trial is aimed to determine the most effective patient outreach approach to increase patients' engagement with messages regarding CRC screening and screening uptake within this specific age-group.

NCT ID: NCT05275530 Active, not recruiting - Colorectal Cancer Clinical Trials

The Impact of Choice on Colorectal Cancer Screening

CRC45+
Start date: February 21, 2022
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

In May of 2021, the United States Preventive Service Task Force (USPSTF) updated their colorectal cancer (CRC) screening guidelines by recommending screening at an earlier age for average-risk adults starting at the age of 45 years old (Grade B recommendation). This is in addition to their Grade A recommendations of continuing to screen average-risk adults ages 50-75 years old. UCLA Health previously implemented a fecal immunochemical test (FIT) outreach program wherein FIT kits are mailed to average-risk patients overdue for CRC screening twice annually to promote screening uptake. As the investigators health system aims to screen the newly eligible population of average-risk patients between the ages of 45-49, the investigators proposed randomized controlled trial is aimed to determine the most effective patient outreach approach to maximize screening uptake within this age-group.

NCT ID: NCT05238558 Active, not recruiting - Colorectal Cancer Clinical Trials

Safety and Immune Response to FMPV-1

Start date: January 31, 2022
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This is a single centre, open-label, non-randomized, Phase I study assessing safety and immune response of FMPV-1 in healthy male subjects.