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Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections clinical trials

View clinical trials related to Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections.

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NCT ID: NCT03405064 Completed - Clinical trials for Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections

Comparative Study of Levonadifloxacin (IV and Oral) With Linezolid (IV and Oral) in Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections (ABSSSI)

Start date: August 25, 2017
Phase: Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

This is a phase III, multi-center, randomized, active-comparator, study in subjects with ABSSSI. The study has two subgroups for assessment of efficacy and safety - oral subgroup 1 and IV subgroup 2. Each subgroup will comprise of two treatment arms.

NCT ID: NCT03176134 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections

A Study of Safety and Efficacy of MK-1986 (Tedizolid Phosphate) and Comparator in Participants From Birth to Less Than 12 Years of Age With Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections (MK-1986-018)

Start date: January 20, 2019
Phase: Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

This study will evaluate the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of tedizolid phosphate (MK-1986) compared with comparator antibacterial agent in participants from birth to less than 12 years of age with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections.

NCT ID: NCT03137173 Completed - Clinical trials for Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections

Ceftobiprole in the Treatment of Patients With Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections

Start date: February 19, 2018
Phase: Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

This was a randomized, double-blind, active-controlled, parallel-group, multicenter study in adult hospitalized patients to establish the safety and efficacy of ceftobiprole medocaril compared with vancomycin plus aztreonam in the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs).

NCT ID: NCT02961764 Completed - Clinical trials for Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections

Evaluation of a New Critical Pathway for Treatment of Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections (ABSSSI)

Start date: November 29, 2016
Phase: Phase 4
Study type: Interventional

This study will evaluate a new critical pathway (use of guideline-based patient identification criteria and for those who meet these criteria, use of dalbavancin) for the treatment of ABSSSI compared to usual care.

NCT ID: NCT02570490 Completed - Clinical trials for Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections

Oral Sodium Fusidate (CEM-102) Versus Oral Linezolid for the Treatment of Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections

Start date: November 2015
Phase: Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

Phase 3, randomized, double-blind, multi-center efficacy and safety study to evaluate an oral CEM-102 loading dose regimen compared to oral linezolid in the treatment of subjects with ABSSSI

NCT ID: NCT01734694 Terminated - Bacteremia Clinical Trials

Safety and Efficacy of Strategy to Prevent Drug-Induced Nephrotoxicity in High-Risk Patients

STOP-NT
Start date: October 2011
Phase: Phase 4
Study type: Interventional

For more than fifty years, vancomycin has been cited as a nephrotoxic agent. Reports of vancomycin induced kidney injury (a.k.a vancomycin induced nephrotoxicity or VIN), have waxed and waned throughout the years for various reasons. Recently, VIN has reemerged as a clinical concern. This may be due to various reasons, including new dosing recommendations as well as an increased prevalence of risk factors associated with vancomycin induced nephrotoxicity. This study aims to evaluate a strategy which attempts to reduce kidney damage from vancomycin use.

NCT ID: NCT00949130 Completed - Clinical trials for Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections

Comparative Study of NXL103 Versus Linezolid in Adults With Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections (ABSSSI)

Start date: November 2009
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

The objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of oral NXL103 vs. established treatment of acute bacterial infection in adults.