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Acceptance and Commitment Therapy clinical trials

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NCT ID: NCT04630912 Not yet recruiting - Dementia Clinical Trials

ACT for People With Dementia Experiencing Psychological Distress

Start date: December 14, 2020
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Dementia is a condition that causes cognitive decline beyond normal ageing. Anxiety and depression are very common in people with dementia, but their needs are often under-recognised and under-served. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) can reduce anxiety and depression by increasing psychological flexibility, the ability to pursue a meaningful life, in spite of unpleasant thoughts or feelings. There is much to learn about if and how ACT works for people with dementia, and whether it could be an effective psychological therapy for this population. Three participants with a dementia diagnosis and clinically-significant levels of anxiety and/or depression will be identified by their GP or Memory Assessment Service (MAS) in Nottinghamshire. Participants will attend 12 weekly, 90-minute sessions of ACT with the Principal Investigator (PI), accompanied by their caregiver if they so wish. In session, participants will complete several short questionnaires to measure their anxiety and depression, goals for therapy, psychological flexibility and relationship with the therapist. One week after the final session, an independent researcher will meet with participants and their carers to discuss their opinions of therapy and any changes to their anxiety and/or depression. One and three months after therapy, participants will be sent two short questionnaires to measure their current anxiety and depression. Information gathered from the independent researcher and questionnaires will be used to develop a case record for each participant, which will be looked at by independent psychotherapy experts to see whether ACT was effective. This research is being funded by Health Education England and is expected to last one year in total. Participant duration will last about 7 months. The study will form a Doctoral Thesis at the University of Nottingham and will be submitted to a peer-reviewed journal for distribution.

NCT ID: NCT04307706 Completed - Stress Clinical Trials

Using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Parents of Disabled Child

ACT
Start date: January 1, 2019
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This study was carried out to determine the effect of ACT-based interventions applied to parents of special needs children (CSN) on their levels of psychological inflexibility, psychological resilience, depression, anxiety, stress, and caregiver burden.

NCT ID: NCT04193514 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Acceptance and Commitment Therapy

ACT for High-risk Pregnancy

Start date: November 15, 2019
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This study is designed to reduce the psychological distress of women with high-risk pregnancy. Women who express interest and are eligible will have the opportunity to participate in a 7-day acceptance therapy. This therapy is based on the theory that attempts to control internal states, thoughts and feelings can contribute to symptoms of depression, anxiety and/or stress. This study aims to educate women about how the willingness to experience uncomfortable pregnancy-related sensations and thoughts, rather than fighting them, can provide relief. The therapy is completed virtually, with the first therapy session done over video call with the therapist. Following, participants complete the remaining six days of therapy on their own using a work book. All women participating in the study will be asked to complete a series of self-report questionnaires before, during, and immediately following treatment, as well as twice postpartum. Participants will receive up to $60 and a work book for participation.

NCT ID: NCT03991546 Completed - Pain, Postoperative Clinical Trials

Pain and Narcotic Usage After Orthopaedic Surgery

Start date: June 3, 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This study aims to 1) observe the course of pain, 2) utilization of opioid pain medication, and 3) possible effect of a behavioral intervention delivered via an automated mobile phone messaging robot in patients undergoing surgical treatment of a traumatic orthopaedic injury.

NCT ID: NCT03666455 Recruiting - Chronic Pain Clinical Trials

Treating Pain With Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Trial

T-PACT
Start date: January 1, 2019
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The long-term goal is to define best practices for diminishing the risk of high opioid doses used to treat chronic non-cancer pain (CNCP) patients while optimizing pain outcomes and functional levels of activity, emotional functioning, and quality of life. The short-term goal is to assess the feasibility of multiple Clinical and Translational Research Award (CTSA) sites working together to perform and study the effects of a cognitive behavioral therapy intervention in a future randomized controlled trial (RCT) among CNCP patients in rural primary care practices in each CTSA state.

NCT ID: NCT03565731 Completed - Physical Activity Clinical Trials

Exercise Values of Life and Vitality Everyday

EVOLVE
Start date: March 8, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of this study is to develop and test a brief program to help overweight people become more physically active. We plan to design a program that teaches people how to become more active by identifying how fitness enables them to live their lives better. Participants will be asked to complete questionnaires and wear a device that tracks their exercise for 1 week. If accepted into the study, they will receive a 1 day program designed to help them exercise more. Then they will receive phone calls and emails for support after the program. Finally, participants will come in 3 and 6 months after the program to complete the same questionnaires and wear the exercise tracker again. The study is primarily interested in increasing exercise levels, and so we hope to see participants exercising more after the program than they were before. We will also ask them questions (via the questionnaires) that tell us the degree to which they are exercising based on their one desires and values, as opposed to doing it because they were told to.

NCT ID: NCT03295032 Completed - Stroke Clinical Trials

A Mixed-methods Evaluation of an Adapted Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) Group for Stroke Survivors

Start date: March 1, 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Stroke is one of the main causes of acquired adult disability in the UK. Many psychological problems can also occur post-stroke; this has a marked impact on health service usage. As such, there is an outstanding need to increase and improve psychological resources within stroke services. The investigators proposed to adapt and evaluate the effectiveness of an acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) group intervention for adult stroke survivors and their carers. The group will endeavour to promote positive adjustment and reduce levels of depression and anxiety. This study will have two parts.

NCT ID: NCT03205839 Completed - Burns Clinical Trials

Acceptance-based Self-help for Individuals With Visible Difference and Social Anxiety

Start date: July 27, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) model theoretically fits with treating appearance-related anxiety in individuals with a visible difference. This study examines the effectiveness of an acceptance-based self-help manual for this population.

NCT ID: NCT02437188 Completed - Clinical trials for Substance Use Disorder

Preventing Persistent Post-Surgical Pain and Opioid Use In At-Risk Veterans: Effect of ACT

PreACT
Start date: February 2015
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

A large number of veterans suffer from distress-based conditions, such as anxiety and depression, putting them at high risk of experiencing persistent pain and prolonged opioid use following surgery. These connections are based on strong and consistent evidence from the literature and our preliminary data. The proposed study adds a 1-day workshop of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), followed by an individual "booster" session, to treatment as usual (TAU) to reduce veterans' risk of persistent pain and prolonged opioid use following surgery. ACT has been shown to be effective in reducing chronic pain, anxiety and depression. This pilot study will establish the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of incorporating ACT into treatment as usual (TAU) to preoperatively target distress-based risk factors. Aim 1 is to establish the feasibility of successfully delivering ACT to at-risk veterans before and after surgery. Aim 2 is to test the preliminary efficacy of ACT on the length and/or amount of pain and opioid use after surgery. Veterans who are anxious or depressed before surgery will be randomly assigned to receive ACT plus TAU or TAU. Outcomes between the two groups will be compared. Aim 3 is to see if PROMIS modules, developed by the National Institute of Health, are useful for assessing pain and other symptoms in veterans. Findings from this study will be used to inform the design and implementation of a larger, well controlled, randomized clinical trial that will evaluate the efficacy of ACT plus TAU for at-risk veterans. This study will take place at the Iowa City VA Health Care System (VAMC). Veterans scheduled for orthopedic or open abdominal surgery in 1 to 3 months who score high for anxiety or depression will be randomly assigned to attend a 1-day ACT workshop preoperatively, with an individualize "booster" session postoperatively, or to have TAU. Veterans who receive ACT and trainers who provide the treatment will be interviewed to identify barriers and facilitators to providing ACT to at-risk veterans before and after surgery. Other primarily outcomes are pain and opioid use after surgery. Factors that may affect these outcomes will also be measured, including anxiety, depression, substance use disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, and use of other pain meds. The investigators expect to gain important knowledge about ways to best include ACT as part of routine care for veterans requiring surgery and about the preliminary efficacy of ACT for the prevention of persistent pain and prolonged opioid use following surgery.