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NCT ID: NCT05686070 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Acute Non-cardioembolic Ischemic Stroke

A Study to Learn More About Asundexian (Also Called BAY2433334) for Prevention of Ischemic Stroke in Male and Female Participants Aged 18 Years and Older Who Already Had Such a Stroke Due to a Blood Clot That Formed Outside the Heart and Travelled to the Brain, or Temporary Stroke-like Symptoms

OCEANIC-STROKE
Start date: February 16, 2023
Phase: Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

Researchers are looking for a better way to prevent an ischemic stroke which occurs when a blood clot travelled to the brain in people who within the last 72 hours had: - a stroke due to a blood clot that formed outside the heart (acute non-cardioembolic ischemic stroke), or - temporary stroke-like symptoms with a high risk of turning into a stroke (high-risk transient ischemic attack), and who are planned to receive standard of care therapy. Ischemic strokes or transient ischemic attacks result from a blocked or reduced blood flow to a part of the brain. They are caused by blood clots that travel to the brain and block the vessels that supply it. If these blood clots form elsewhere than in the heart, the stroke is called non-cardioembolic. People who already had a non-cardioembolic stroke are more likely to have another stroke. This is why they are treated preventively with an antiplatelet therapy, the current standard of care. Antiplatelet medicines prevent platelets, components of blood clotting, from clumping together. Anticoagulants are another type of medicine that prevents blood clots from forming by interfering with a process known as coagulation (or blood clotting). The study treatment asundexian is a new type of anticoagulant currently under development to provide further treatment options. The way it works, it aims to further improve the standard of care with regard to the risk of bleeding. The main purpose of this study is to learn whether asundexian works better than placebo at reducing ischemic strokes in participants who recently had a non-cardioembolic ischemic stroke or temporary stroke-like symptoms when given in addition to standard antiplatelet therapy. A placebo is a treatment that looks like a medicine but does not have any medicine in it. Another aim is to compare the occurrence of major bleeding events during the study between the asundexian and the placebo group. Major bleedings have a serious or even life-threatening impact on a person's health. Dependent on the treatment group, the participants will either take asundexian or placebo as tablets once a day for at least 3 months up to 31 months. Approximately every 3 months during the treatment period, either a phone call or a visit to the study site is scheduled on an alternating basis. In addition, one visit before and up to two visits after the treatment period are planned. During the study, the study team will: - Check vital signs such as blood pressure and heart rate - Examine the participants' heart health using an electrocardiogram (ECG) - Take blood samples - Ask the participants questions about how they are feeling and what adverse events they are having. An adverse event is any medical problem that a participant has during a study. Doctors keep track of all adverse events that happen in studies, even if they do not think the adverse events might be related to the study treatments. In addition, the participants will be asked to complete a questionnaire on quality of life at certain time points during the study.

NCT ID: NCT05643573 Recruiting - Atrial Fibrillation Clinical Trials

A Study to Learn How Well the Study Treatment Asundexian Works and How Safe it is Compared to Apixaban to Prevent Stroke or Systemic Embolism in People With Irregular and Often Rapid Heartbeat (Atrial Fibrillation), and at Risk for Stroke

OCEANIC-AF
Start date: December 5, 2022
Phase: Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

Researchers are looking for a better way to treat people with atrial fibrillation and prevent stroke or systemic embolism (blood clots travelling through the blood stream to plug another vessel). Atrial fibrillation is a condition of having irregular and often rapid heartbeat. It can lead to the formation of blood clots in the heart which can travel through the blood stream to plug another vessel, and like this lead to serious and life-threatening conditions, such as a stroke. A stroke occurs because the brain tissue beyond the blockage no longer receives nutrients and oxygen so that brain cells die. As strokes arising from atrial fibrillation can involve extensive areas of the brain, it is important to prevent them. Blood clots are formed in a process known as coagulation. Medications are already available to prevent the formation of blood clots. When taken by mouth (orally), they are known as oral anticoagulants (OACs) including apixaban. OACs decrease the risk of the above-mentioned serious and life-threatening conditions. The main side effect of OACs is an increase of the risk of bleeding. The study treatment asundexian is a new type of anticoagulant currently under development to provide further treatment options. The way it works, it aims to further improve the standard of care with regard to the risk of bleeding. The main purpose of this study is to collect more data about how well asundexian works to prevent stroke and systemic embolism and how safe it is compared to apixaban in people with atrial fibrillation and at high risk for stroke. To see how well the study treatment asundexian works researchers compare: - how long asundexian works well and - how long apixaban works well after the start of the treatment. Working well means that the treatments can prevent the following from happening: - stroke and/or - systemic embolism. The study will keep collecting data until a certain number of strokes or embolisms happen in the study. To see how safe asundexian is, the researchers will compare how often major bleedings occur after taking the study treatments asundexian and apixaban, respectively. Major bleedings are bleedings that have a serious or even life-threatening impact on a person's health. The study participants will be randomly (by chance) assigned to 1 of 2 treatment groups, A and B. Dependent on the treatment group, the participants will either take the study treatment asundexian by mouth once a day or apixaban by mouth twice a day for approximately 9 - 33 months. Each participant will be in the study for approximately 9 - 34 months. There will be visits to the study site every 3 to 6 months and up to 7 phone calls. Those participants who do not want or are unable to have visits to the study site may join the study remotely in selected countries. All visits for these participants will be done using electronic devices. During the study, the study team will: - take blood samples - do physical examinations - examine heart health using an electrocardiogram (ECG) - check vital signs such as blood pressure and heart rate - do pregnancy tests - ask the participants questions about their quality of life - ask the participants questions about how they are feeling and what adverse events they are having. An adverse event is any medical problem that a participant has during a study. Doctors keep track of all adverse events that happen in studies, even if they do not think the adverse events might be related to the study treatments.

NCT ID: NCT05639218 Active, not recruiting - Clinical trials for Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease

Impact of Optimal Pharmacotherapy on Lipid Profile and Qualitative Features of Atherosclerotic Plaques

Start date: June 29, 2021
Phase:
Study type: Observational

Lipid accumulation, with mostly emphasized role of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), is the pathogenetic cornerstone of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Standard hypolipidemic therapy, based on statins and ezetimibe, does not always decrease LDL-C levels enough to achieve therapeutic goals. A novel and promising direction is inhibition of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) in hepatocytes, subsequently reducing LDL-C receptor degradation and increasing intracellular LDL-C uptake. Aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of optimal hypolipidemic pharmacotherapy, including PCSK9 inhibitors and inclisiran, on plasma lipid profile and qualitative features of atherosclerotic plaques in very-high cardiovascular risk patients. This study enrolls patients with an established atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, receiving PCSK9 inhibitors or inclisiran as add-on treatment to statins in maximally tolerated dose and/or ezetimibe. Effect of hypolipidemic pharmacotherapy is evaluated by analysis of plasma lipid profile parameter changes and qualitative features of atherosclerotic plaques using Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Intravascular Ultrasound Imaging (NIRS-IVUS) method. Results of the study would be sufficient for complementing evidence regarding therapeutic strategy in very-high cardiovascular risk patients.

NCT ID: NCT05636176 Not yet recruiting - Heart Failure Clinical Trials

A Research Study to Look at How Ziltivekimab Works Compared to Placebo in People With Heart Failure and Inflammation

HERMES
Start date: May 8, 2023
Phase: Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

This study will be done to see if ziltivekimab can be used to treat people living with heart failure and inflammation. Participants will either get ziltivekimab or placebo. The study is expected to last for up to 4 years. Participants will have up to 20 clinic visits. Participants will have to use a study app on their phone to record and share information about all their injections of study medicine and to fill in questionnaires.

NCT ID: NCT05592496 Active, not recruiting - Postoperative Pain Clinical Trials

Bilateral Retromuscular Rectus Sheath Block Catheters Usage for Early Postoperative Analgesia After Laparotomic Gastrectomy.

Start date: January 1, 2021
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

In early postoperative period, the occurrence of severe pain after open major upper GI surgery is a significant issue. The study is aimed to access the efficiency of rectus sheet block with continuous bupivacaine infusion catheters into retromuscular space in providing an effective pain relief, decreasing opioid consumption and enhancing postoperative recovery.

NCT ID: NCT05531149 Recruiting - COVID-19 Clinical Trials

Efficacy and Safety of Trimodulin (BT588) in Subjects With Moderate or Severe COVID-19

TRICOVID
Start date: January 10, 2023
Phase: Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

The main objectives of the trial are to assess the efficacy and safety of trimodulin as adjunctive treatment to standard of care (SoC) compared to placebo plus SoC in adult hospitalized subjects with moderate or severe COVID-19. Other objectives are to determine pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) properties of trimodulin.

NCT ID: NCT05518344 Terminated - Myopia Clinical Trials

Study of Viziatek ISL™ Refractive Phakic Intra Sulcus Lens for Refraction Adjustment in Blind Volunteers

Start date: June 4, 2020
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This is a clinical investigation. A total of up to 5 subjects, but not less than 3 at one investigational site will undergo insertion of the ISL in one eye and will be followed through 6 months postoperative. Subjects from the United States will not be enrolled in this study.

NCT ID: NCT05506293 Recruiting - Quality of Life Clinical Trials

European Multicentre Registry of Percutaneous Paravalvular Leak Closure

EuroPVL
Start date: January 1, 2020
Phase:
Study type: Observational [Patient Registry]

Paraprosthetic cardiac valve leaks are a progressive complication after after surgical or percutaneous heart valve replacement. These leaks can lead to heart failure and/or life-threatening hemolysis. Percutaneous closure of para-prosthetic leaks has been developed as an alternative to surgery in high-risk patients. These procedures remain technically challenging with a significant risk of failure and complications, but this risk is improved since the development of dedicated prostheses and the increased experience of the operators. The data in the literature concerning percutaneous leak closure remain limited and disparate and mostly retrospective.The impact of the procedures on the quality of life of patients is not known. Beyond the technical aspects and the follow-up of major cardiovascular events, investigators also wonder what is the impact of these procedures on the quality of life of patients. Investigators hypothesize that even a partial reduction in paraprosthetic leakage may be associated with an improvement in quality of life through reduction of transfusion needs and/or reduction of dyspnea. A prospective study is warranted to assess the technical and clinical and clinical results of these procedures, together with the evaluation of the the possible benefit on the quality of life of the patients.

NCT ID: NCT05502068 Completed - COVID-19 Clinical Trials

The Effects of a Sublingual Sprayable Microemulsion of Vitamin D on Inflammatory Markers in COVID-19 Patients

Start date: February 1, 2021
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This placebo-controlled five-day study will be performed on 100 hospitalized COVID-19 patients with vitamin D insufficiency randomized into two groups. Vitamin D in the form of a sublingual sprayable microemulsion (LYL love your life® sunD3 LYLmicro™) is given three times daily after breakfast, lunch, and dinner (daily dose 12,000 IU) to patients with blood vitamin D levels below 30 ng/ml. The control (placebo) group recieves a placebo spray in the same daily regimen.

NCT ID: NCT05473299 Recruiting - Clinical trials for End-stage Renal Disease

Xeltis Hemodialysis Access Graft: aXess Pivotal Study

Start date: November 4, 2022
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

A prospective, single arm, non-randomized pivotal study to evaluate the safety and performance of the Xeltis hemodialysis access graft in subjects older than 18 years with end-stage renal disease, who plan to undergo hemodialysis for at least the first 6 months after study access creation.