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Hepatocellular Carcinoma clinical trials

View clinical trials related to Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

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NCT ID: NCT02839954 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

CAR-pNK Cell Immunotherapy in MUC1 Positive Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumor

Start date: July 2016
Phase: Phase 1/Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of CAR-pNK cell immunotherapy in patients with MUC1 positive relapsed or refractory solid tumor.

NCT ID: NCT02833298 Not yet recruiting - Hepatitis C Clinical Trials

Post Sustained Virological Response (SVR) Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC) Screening

Start date: September 2016
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

Approximately half of the patients receiving treatment for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in the United States have advanced liver disease. Patients with advanced fibrosis/cirrhosis who achieve a sustained virological response (SVR) to treatment and are clinically cured of HCV continue to have an elevated risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). According to guidelines from several professional societies and from the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD), in particular, patients with advanced fibrosis/cirrhosis should undergo life-long bi-annual screening for incident HCC whether they achieve an SVR, or not. The number of patients who need post-SVR HCC screening has risen dramatically in recent years due to the confluence of three factors: Increased screening for HCV, which has allowed more people to realize that they have this often "silent" infection; the availability of safe and highly effective direct acting antiviral drugs (DAAs) for HCV, which has allowed a much higher percentage of treated patients to achieve an SVR; and the long duration of HCV infection in many patients, which has allowed enough time for advanced fibrosis/cirrhosis to develop. To investigate post-SVR patients in the era of DAAs and to promote HCC screening, the objective of this study is to conduct a randomized, unblinded, two-arm prospective intervention trial comparing rates of HCC screening between patients randomized to either personalized patient navigation or automated reminders (e.g. electronic or mailed). Both interventions represent improved care over current standard of care (no patient navigation or automated reminders). There is no evidence to suggest one intervention is better than the other. Healthcare providers who agree to participate in the study will be contacted to confirm the liver disease status of their patients and during the clinical trial the providers of patients in both arms of the trial will be sent reminders about the need to schedule patients for screening visits.

NCT ID: NCT02830737 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

No-touch RFA Versus Traditional RFA for Small Hepatocellular Carcinoma

Start date: January 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Traditional RFA treatment has been a curable therapy for small hepatocellular carcinoma (diameter≤3cm). This technique ablates the tumor via radio frequency by inserting an electrode needle directly into the tumor. This clearly violates no-touch technique based on the principle of surgical oncology. Thus the 1-year recurrence rate of the cancer is up to 30% after the treatment, and the 3-year tumor-free survival rate is only 20% - 40%. No-touch RFA treatment avoids the direct contact with the tumor that can cause the spread of cancer cells in the liver, or the Antrim spread, Therefore it has been suggested that no-touch RFA treatment reduce the recurrence rate after operation in comparison with the traditional RFA treatment. This research project aims at using the prospective randomized comparative method to compare the short-term and the long-term curative effects between no-touch RFA and traditional RFA treatments for small hepatic carcinoma.

NCT ID: NCT02828865 Enrolling by invitation - Clinical trials for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

A Clinical Trial Using Irreversible Electroporation for the Treatment of Liver Cancers

Start date: January 2013
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

Liver cancer including primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and metastatic liver cancers is one the most common malignancies in the world. Over 10000 new cases per year are diagnosed in Taiwan. Despite the many treatment options, the prognosis of HCC remains dismal. More than 8000 people died of this cancer every year in Taiwan. A majority (70% to 85%) of patients present with advanced or unresectable disease. In contrast, small liver cancers can be cured with an appreciable frequency. Five-year disease-free survival exceeding 50% has been reported for surgical resection, and for the inoperable patients who do not have vascular invasion or extrahepatic spread. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is recommended as an alternative curative therapy. However, the main drawback of RFA is its limitation to tumor size and location. The tumors larger than 5 cm in diameter or located adjacent to vessels, could not be ablated completely sometimes.

NCT ID: NCT02821533 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

Chemoembolization for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

Start date: February 2012
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

The aim of the current study is to study the safety and effectiveness of TACE using a high dose of cisplatin for treatment of HCC. It is hypothesized that the formulation is safe and it improves the therapeutic effect of conventional TACE.

NCT ID: NCT02819869 Active, not recruiting - Clinical trials for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

The Combination Effect of Statin Plus Metformin on Relapse-free

Start date: January 2016
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

The study demonstrated that either statin or metformin served as notable use in reducing the incidence of many cancers.

NCT ID: NCT02809534 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

A Study of Anlotinib in Patients With Hepatocellular Carcinoma

ALTER0802
Start date: June 2016
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

To assess the primary effects and safety of Anlotinib with placebo in patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma(HCC).

NCT ID: NCT02809287 Completed - Clinical trials for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

A Novel Laparoscopic Hepatectomy Posture, Left Lateral Position Plus Jackknife Position

Start date: January 2015
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

Since the first report of laparoscopic resection of a benign hepatic tumor by Professor H. Reith in 1991, the laparoscope has been widely used in liver disease. Based on its advantages in laparoscopic vision and amplification, laparoscopic hepatectomy (LH) has been well recognized globally. Generally speaking, for lesions located in the left, front or lower part of the liver, corresponding to Couinaud segments II, III, IVb, V and VI, an LH surgery is recommended; however, for lesions located in segments VII and VIII, the surgery is high technically difficult due to poor exposure. Therefore,the investigators employ the left lateral position plus jackknife position to better expose lesions in these segments, hoping to reduce surgical time and bleeding in LH.

NCT ID: NCT02802124 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

Carbon Ion Radiotherapy for the Treatment of Chinese Hepatocellular Carcinoma

Start date: June 2016
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

The aim of this research project is to assess the feasibility and safety of carbon-ion radiotherapy for the treatment of localized Chinese hepatocellular carcinoma

NCT ID: NCT02799212 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

Evaluation of Postoperative Ascites After Somatostatin Infusion Following Hepatectomy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma by Laparotomy

SOMAPROTECT01
Start date: January 2017
Phase: Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

Most patients undergoing hepatectomy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) suffer from underlying liver disease and are exposed to the risk of postoperative ascites, with subsequent morbidity, liver and renal failure, the need for specific treatments and prolonged hospital stay. Postoperative ascites is favored by an imbalance between portal venous inflow and the diminished hepatic venous outflow. Finding a reversible, non-invasive method for modulating the portal inflow would be of interest: it could be used temporarily during the early postoperative course to prevent acute portal hypertension. Somatostatin, a well-known drug already used in several indications, may limit the risk of postoperative ascites and liver failure by decreasing portal pressure after hepatectomy for HCC in patients with underlying liver disease.