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Myocardial Ischemia clinical trials

View clinical trials related to Myocardial Ischemia.

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NCT ID: NCT06362278 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Coronary Artery Disease

A Multi-omics Study of "Healthy" Premature CAD Patients

Start date: March 20, 2024
Phase:
Study type: Observational

The goal of this multi-center observational clinical trial is to investigate the genetic risk factors of patients with premature CAD and none traditional CAD risk factors through a multi-omics approach. The main questions it aims to answer are: - Genetic risk factors & metabolic fingerprints of patients with premature CAD and none traditional CAD risk factors remain unknown. - How to optimize current primary prevention strategy for this rare CAD subgroup?

NCT ID: NCT06358508 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Coronary Artery Disease

Sapphire 3 CTO Study

Start date: June 2024
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

A prospective, open label, multi-center, single arm, observational study designed to evaluate the acute safety and device performance of the Sapphire 3 0.85, 1.0 and 1.25mm diameter coronary dilatation catheter in predilatation of Chronic Total Occlusion (CTO) lesions during percutaneous coronary intervention. One hundred seventy (170) subjects will be enrolled with a target of one hundred fifty-three (153) evaluable subjects by the angiographic core laboratory at up to 15 clinical sites with the Sapphire 3 0.85, 1.0 and 1.25mm diameter PTCA dilatation catheter to pre-dilate CTO lesions in coronary arteries during their index procedure. All subjects will be screened according to the protocol inclusion and exclusion criteria and will be followed through study completion, which is defined as 24-hours post-procedure or hospital discharge, whichever comes first.

NCT ID: NCT06358105 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Coronary Artery Disease

Simulator Training to Improve Interventional Cardiologist Skills (STARTERS) Trial

STARTERS
Start date: November 15, 2024
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The goal of this clinical trial is to learn if simulator-based training will improve interventional cardiology fellows' skills and will improve patient outcomes. The main questions it aims to answer are: - Does this training improve specific operative parameters recorded during initial coronary interventions performed as first operators under senior supervision? - Will major and minor procedural complications be reduced after simulator-based training? Interventional cardiology fellows in their first year of training will be randomized between standard master-apprentice training or simulator-based training before starting their cath lab period. They will be supervised during their cath lab period as first operators by senior interventional cardiologists. During their first 50 procedures performed as supervised first operator, specific procedural data will be collected.

NCT ID: NCT06345573 Active, not recruiting - Myocardial Ischemia Clinical Trials

Heart-brain-axis and Psychosocial Stress

Start date: October 11, 2021
Phase:
Study type: Observational

The main study objective is to prospectively determine the influence of sex-related risk factors and psychosocial variables on neuronal stress responses and myocardial perfusion in a population of 64 female and male individuals 50-75 years of age and free of cardiovascular disease.

NCT ID: NCT06342609 Active, not recruiting - Clinical trials for Coronary Artery Disease

Effect of Colchicine on Progression of Known Coronary Atherosclerosis in Patients With Stable Coronary Artery Disease

EKSTROM
Start date: March 15, 2023
Phase: Phase 4
Study type: Interventional

This is a randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled, investigator-initiated trial that compares Colchicine 0.5mg/day with placebo, among patients with stable CAD. Subjects will be educated to maintain medication compliance with other prescribed medications.

NCT ID: NCT06340373 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Coronary Artery Disease

Clinical and Angiographic Outcomes of Post-drug-coated Balloon Angioplasty in Native Coronary Lesions

Start date: January 1, 2024
Phase:
Study type: Observational

The progression of cardiac revascularization techniques, starting with standard balloon angioplasty (POBA) and progressing to the creation of drug-coated balloons (DCB) and drug-eluting stents (DES). The study's justification is presented, with a focus on the significance of comprehending the clinical and angiographic outcomes of DCB angioplasty, especially when considering the Bangladeshi population. This study's main goal is to observe the clinical and angiographic outcomes of drug-coated balloon angioplasty after native coronary lesions that have been successfully revascularized. A few specific goals are to evaluate angiographic results (like percentage diameter stenosis, vascular remodelling, restenosis, and thrombosis) after DCB angioplasty and to assess clinical outcomes (like worsening angina, target vessel MI, ischemia-driven TLR, and cardiac mortality). This observational study will take place from January to December 2024 at the Department of Cardiology, National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases. The study population will be individuals who had successful revascularization of native coronary lesions with DCB angioplasty six months before. The study includes non-randomized purposive sampling, and the sample size will be determined by drawing on previous studies. Every patient will receive a thorough clinical assessment that includes a history, physical examination, electrocardiogram, and biochemical testing. The data will be analysed in accordance with the assessment of angiographic outcomes by follow-up angiography. The purpose of this study is to give useful insights into the clinical and angiographic results of DCB angioplasty in Bangladeshi patients with native coronary lesions, including the growing body of knowledge on the efficacy and safety of this therapeutic strategy in specific populations.

NCT ID: NCT06338761 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Coronary Artery Disease

Switching to E-cigarette After PCI

E-cig-PCI
Start date: January 1, 2024
Phase:
Study type: Observational

Despite the increasing popularity of electronic cigarettes (E-cigarettes), the prognostic impact of switching to E-cigarettes in smokers with coronary artery disease (CAD) who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) remains uncertain.

NCT ID: NCT06335901 Completed - Clinical trials for Coronary Heart Disease

Clinical Characteristics and Outcomes of Coronary Heart Disease

Start date: February 1, 2020
Phase:
Study type: Observational

This study evaluated and compared the prognostic value of different Baseline data and clinical variables to develop a risk ractor ediction model in patients with CHD.

NCT ID: NCT06328322 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Left Main Coronary Artery Disease With Acute Coronary Syndrome

Study of Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in Left Main Coronary Artery Disease in Patients With Acute Coronary Syndrome at Sohag University Hospitals

Start date: April 1, 2024
Phase:
Study type: Observational

Acute coronary syndromes (ACS) encompass a spectrum of cardiovascular disorders characterized by the sudden onset of myocardial ischemia. They are primarily caused by atherosclerotic plaque rupture or erosion, leading to partial or complete occlusion of the coronary arteries. Among the various coronary arteries affected, left main coronary artery disease (LMCAD) is of particular concern due to its high anatomical significance and potential for adverse outcomes The left main coronary artery (LMCA) is responsible for supplying a substantial portion of the left ventricular myocardium, including the interventricular septum and the anterior and lateral walls. Any obstruction or compromise in blood flow within this critical artery can have severe consequences, including myocardial infarction, heart failure, or even sudden cardiac death. The management of LMCAD associated with ACS represents a significant clinical challenge, necessitating prompt and optimal treatment strategies Among the various coronary arteries affected by atherosclerosis, left main coronary artery disease (LMCAD) holds particular clinical significance due to its anatomical location and the vital role it plays in supplying a substantial portion of the left ventricular myocardium. The left main coronary artery (LMCA) typically bifurcates into the left anterior descending artery (LAD) and the left circumflex artery (LCX), which together provide blood supply to the majority of the left ventricle, including the interventricular septum and the anterior and lateral walls The selection of an appropriate treatment strategy for LMCAD associated with ACS is a complex decision that requires careful consideration of multiple factors, including patient characteristics, coronary anatomy, severity of ischemia, and procedural expertise. The emergence of several clinical trials and observational studies exploring the efficacy and safety of different revascularization strategies has further complicated the decision-making process

NCT ID: NCT06327984 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Coronary Artery Disease

Barts Sex-CAD Database

Start date: May 2024
Phase:
Study type: Observational [Patient Registry]

There is a lack of understanding of how Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) - meaning the blocking or furring up of the arteries of the heart - starts and progresses in women. In both men and women, CAD is the most common cause of heart attacks, which occur when the blood supply in the heart is interrupted (these are also known medically as 'acute coronary syndromes'). Before the menopause women appear to be protected from CAD; however, after the menopause that protection is lost. Also, those women who do suffer a heart attack have twice the risk of further heart attacks compared to men despite having the same treatment that works well in men. Biological differences between men and women are probably playing an important role in the way CAD develops. However, due to a lack of research there is currently little understanding of how the female body works in this area. Inflammation is the body's natural response to injury or infection. Importantly it is also involved in the development of CAD. Hormones such as oestrogen and testosterone are also likely to be contributory factors. We think the differences between the way these hormones and inflammation play a part in CAD in both men and women are important, but the role they play is not yet fully understood. In this study we wish to measure the 'markers' of inflammation in the blood of patients attending Barts Heart Centre with chest pain. We will also conduct questionnaires with these patients, to understand their hormone status and how parts of their medical history may be a contributory factor. For patients who have previously attended Barts Heart Centre will will contact them to conduct the questionnaire over the telephone only. We will combine this data with the data that is routinely collected during hospital admission. In this way we hope to understand whether inflammation together with hormone status plays an important role in CAD. Our hope is that through this research we will address an under researched area and find new ways of treating women and men with coronary artery disease.