Clinical Trials Logo

Clinical Trial Summary

The superiority of supervised center-based training programs compared with unsupervised home-based ones in older adults remains unclear, and no evidence exists on whether including a motivational component could moderate these differences. The present randomized controlled trial aims to determine the role of supervision and motivational strategies on the safety, adherence, efficacy, and cost-effectiveness of different training programs for improving physical and mental health in older adults. Participants (n=120, aged 60-75 years old) will be randomly divided into five groups: 1- Control group, 2- Unsupervised home-based exercise group without motivational intervention (UNSUP), 3- Unsupervised home-based exercise group with motivational intervention (UNSUP+), 4- Supervised center-based exercise group without motivational intervention (SUP) and 5- Supervised center-based exercise group with motivational intervention (SUP+). Participants assigned to the exercise groups will participate in a 24-week multicomponent exercise program (3 sessions/week, 60 min/session), while participants in the control group will be asked to maintain their usual lifestyle. Physical and mental health outcomes will be assessed, including lower and upper-body muscular function, physical function, cardiorespiratory function, anthropometry and body composition, health-related quality of life, cognitive performance, anxiety and depression status, physical activity and sedentary behavior, sleep, biochemical markers, motivators and barriers to exercise, individual's psychological needs, and level of self-determination. Assessments will be conducted at baseline (week 0), mid-intervention (week 12), at the end of the intervention period (week 25), and 24 weeks after the exercise intervention (week 48).


Clinical Trial Description

Life expectancy for the Spanish population has increased to 85 years for women and 79 years for men, and it is estimated that Spain will be the second oldest country in the world by 2050. This fact contains an inevitable economic and public health challenge. Physical exercise is an effective intervention to attenuate the aging-related decline in physical function and well-being as well as for reducing morbidity and mortality risk. Current guidelines on physical activity (PA) by the World Health Organization (WHO) recommend that older adults perform at least 150-300 min/week of moderate-intensity aerobic PA, 75-150 min/week of vigorous-intensity aerobic PA, or a combination of both, as well as at least 3 days of strength and balance exercise. However, a large part of the older adult population does not meet the general recommendations for PA. This could be at least partly due to the fact that this type of population may have some limitations when starting a supervised center-based physical training program. In this regard, evidence overall shows that supervised center-based training programs are usually limited by issues such as economic constraints, convenience, and access or time commitments. Moreover, there are unpopulated areas comprising a large percentage of older people without direct access to facilities and qualified professionals to engage in effective physical activity. Besides that, the COVID-19 pandemic has opened an opportunity to carry out training programs from home without the supervision of a professional. If effective and safe, these interventions would represent an alternative to increasing the accessibility of physical exercise for older adults. To date, there is a lack of consensus on the effectiveness, safety, and adherence of unsupervised home-based training programs. Several investigations have shown greater effectiveness on different health variables in exercise programs conducted under the supervision of a professional compared to those performed autonomously at home. However, some studies suggest that a home-based exercise intervention could be as effective as a supervised one. Furthermore, meta-analytical evidence recently published by the research team of this project found that the adherence rate to unsupervised physical exercise programs was low, and the intensity applied was not adequately prescribed. It is important to note that the lack of motivation in unsupervised programs might play an important role in these findings. Thus, the use of motivational strategies that foster autonomous motivation might help increase adherence to unsupervised exercise programs, with this adherence being a key factor for achieving health adaptations. Therefore, studies analyzing how to cover all these limitations of unsupervised physical exercise are warranted to answer this research question. Along these lines, an adequate prescription of exercise dose and the implementation of motivational techniques could compensate for the lack of physiological stimulus and low adherence typically observed with this type of training program. Furthermore, there is no evidence comparing the cost-effectiveness, safety, and adherence of supervised face-to-face intervention vs online supervised intervention with and without motivational strategies. Under this context, the aim of this randomized controlled trial (RCT) will be to determine the efficacy, cost-effectiveness, safety, and adherence of different exercise training programs with or without supervision and the inclusion of motivational techniques in older adults. Participants (n= 120; men and women aged 60-75 years old) will be divided into 5 groups: 1- Control group, 2- Unsupervised home-based exercise group without motivational intervention (UNSUP), 3- Unsupervised home-based exercise group with motivational intervention (UNSUP+), 4- Supervised center-based exercise group without motivational intervention (SUP) and 5- Supervised center-based exercise group with motivational intervention (SUP+). Exercise groups will perform physical exercise 3 days a week (1-hour sessions) for 24 weeks, with these sessions being performed from home (with the help of a mobile application that will be developed for this purpose) or at a center with the direct supervision of an exercise professional, according to the assigned group. The primary outcome will be lower-body muscular function. Secondary outcomes will be upper-body muscular function, physical function, cardiorespiratory function, anthropometry and body composition, health-related quality of life, cognitive performance, anxiety and depression status, physical activity and sedentary behavior, sleep, biochemical markers, motivators and barriers to exercise, individual's psychological needs, and level of self-determination. Further, an analysis of the costs of the programs (cost-effectiveness and cost-utility), adherence (rate of adherence to the exercise program), and safety (falls and adverse events) will be carried out. ;


Study Design


Related Conditions & MeSH terms


NCT number NCT05619250
Study type Interventional
Source University of Castilla-La Mancha
Contact Asier Mañas, Ph.D.
Phone +34 925268800
Email asier.manas@uclm.es
Status Recruiting
Phase N/A
Start date September 7, 2022
Completion date December 20, 2024

See also
  Status Clinical Trial Phase
Recruiting NCT05511077 - Biomarkers of Oat Product Intake: The BiOAT Marker Study N/A
Recruiting NCT04632485 - Early Detection of Vascular Dysfunction Using Biomarkers From Lagrangian Carotid Strain Imaging
Completed NCT04527718 - Study of the Safety, Tolerability and Pharmacokinetics of 611 in Adult Healthy Volunteers Phase 1
Terminated NCT04556032 - Effects of Ergothioneine on Cognition, Mood, and Sleep in Healthy Adult Men and Women N/A
Completed NCT04065295 - A Study to Test How Well Healthy Men Tolerate Different Doses of BI 1356225 Phase 1
Completed NCT04107441 - AX-8 Drug Safety, Tolerability and Plasma Levels in Healthy Subjects Phase 1
Completed NCT04998695 - Health Effects of Consuming Olive Pomace Oil N/A
Completed NCT01442831 - Evaluate the Absorption, Metabolism, And Excretion Of Orally Administered [14C] TR 701 In Healthy Adult Male Subjects Phase 1
Recruiting NCT05525845 - Studying the Hedonic and Homeostatic Regulation of Food Intake Using Functional MRI N/A
Completed NCT05515328 - A Study in Healthy Men to Test How BI 685509 is Processed in the Body Phase 1
Recruiting NCT04967157 - Cognitive Effects of Citicoline on Attention in Healthy Men and Women N/A
Completed NCT05030857 - Drug-drug Interaction and Food-effect Study With GLPG4716 and Midazolam in Healthy Subjects Phase 1
Recruiting NCT04494269 - A Study to Evaluate Pharmacokinetics and Safety of Tegoprazan in Subjects With Hepatic Impairment and Healthy Controls Phase 1
Recruiting NCT04714294 - Evaluate the Safety, Tolerability and Pharmacokinetics Characteristics of HPP737 in Healthy Volunteers Phase 1
Completed NCT04539756 - Writing Activities and Emotions N/A
Recruiting NCT04098510 - Concentration of MitoQ in Human Skeletal Muscle N/A
Completed NCT03308110 - Bioavailability and Food Effect Study of Two Formulations of PF-06650833 Phase 1
Completed NCT04052711 - A Randomized, Controlled Study to Evaluate the Sensitizing Potential of FMX-101 in Healthy Volunteers Using a Repeat Insult Patch Test Design Phase 1
Terminated NCT00001844 - Study of New Magnetic Resonance Methods
Completed NCT04451811 - A PK Dose Proportionality Study of OPL-002 in Healthy Volunteers Phase 1