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Clinical Trial Summary

Cuff pressure is essential in endotracheal tube management. Guidelines recommend a cuff pressure of 20 to 30 cm H2O. One study, for instance, found that cuff pressure exceeded 40 cm H2O in 40-to-90% of tested patients. This study will investigate the endotracheal ETT cuff inflation pressure applied by the participating anaesthetists, and their response after being informed about the pressure the participants will apply.


Clinical Trial Description

Although the increasing uses of different supraglottic devices as an alternative, the traditional endotracheal intubation is still considered the commonly used method for managing the airway of a generally anaesthetized patient. After passing the endotracheal tube through the larynx, the anaesthetist inflates the cuff or asks the anaesthesia technician to inflate it. How much air is injected into the cuff is not a major concern for almost all anaesthetists and they usually depend on palpating the external cuff tense to judge is it too much, accurate or not enough? Cuff pressure is essential in endotracheal tube management. Guidelines recommend a cuff pressure of 20 to 30 cm H2O. Inflation of the cuff of pressure more than 30 cm H2O can damage the tracheal mucosa by compromising capillary perfusion. When pressures are greater than 50 cm H2O, total obstruction of tracheal blood flow occurs. For long times, without any evidence-based data, it has been believed that well-trained anaesthetists are capable of determining proper ETT cuff pressures. It is presumed that anaesthetists can detect appropriate inflation pressure and overinflated ETT cuff by palpating the ETT pilot balloon. Adequacy of cuff inflation is conventionally determined by palpation of the external balloon. Previous studies suggest that this approach is unreliable. One study, for instance, found that cuff pressure exceeded 40 cm H2O in 40-to-90% of tested patients. However, increased awareness of over-inflation risks may have improved recent clinical practice. The aim of the work: This study will investigate the endotracheal cuff inflation pressure applied by the participating anaesthetists, and their response after being informed about the pressure the participants will apply. Material and Methods: Type of the study: Prospective controlled single-blind study. Settings: After obtaining approval by the Ethics Committee of the Suez Canal University Hospital, and written informed consent with an explanation regarding the purpose, effects, technique, and complications, all anaesthetists, working currently in the facility, are included. ;


Study Design


Related Conditions & MeSH terms


NCT number NCT05034666
Study type Interventional
Source Suez Canal University
Contact
Status Completed
Phase N/A
Start date January 1, 2018
Completion date May 1, 2018

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