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NCT ID: NCT05426577 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Visceral Leishmaniasis

Evaluation of Less Invasive Procedures for Visceral Leishmaniasis Treatment Efficacy Monitoring Test of Cure

VL-ToC
Start date: September 1, 2021
Phase:
Study type: Observational

Left untreated, visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is fatal. The highest burden of VL worldwide is in eastern Africa where field-adapted diagnostic and test-of-cure tools and treatment are lacking. The current laboratory tool to help assessing cure, treatment failure and relapse is microscopy, based on invasive sampling (e.g. splenic or bone marrow aspirate). Non-invasive, more sensitive tools will enable these assessments with minimum risk and discomfort to patients. This study aims to evaluate immunological and molecular tests to predict cure and relapse, and to replace with these the current invasive methods. The study will be conducted at the Leishmaniasis Research and Treatment Centre (LRTC), Gondar University Hospital, Ethiopia It will be a non-intervention study, the tools under evaluation will be considered as index tests; their results will not influence patient management during the duration of the study. Patient management will follow the national guidelines for VL diagnosis and management in Ethiopia.

NCT ID: NCT05387811 Not yet recruiting - Acute Kidney Injury Clinical Trials

International Registry of Acute Kidney Injury in Cirrhosis: The GLOBAL AKI Project

GLOBAL-AKI
Start date: June 15, 2022
Phase:
Study type: Observational [Patient Registry]

The aims of this study will be to identify the clinical characteristics, the management and the outcomes of acute kidney injury in patients with cirrhosis worldwide. Specific aims: 1. To establish the severity of AKI across different regions 2. To identify precipitants of AKI across different centers 3. To identify the phenotypes of AKI across different centers 4. To evaluate differences in the management of AKI across different centers and their impact on clinical outcomes 5. To assess outcomes of acute kidney injury (resolution of AKI, in-hospital mortality, 28-day mortality, 90-day mortality)

NCT ID: NCT05385380 Completed - Clinical trials for Maternal Health Services

A Cluster Randomized Controlled Intervention to Improve Institutional Birth Rate in a Rural District of Ethiopia

Start date: September 14, 2019
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Despite the efforts from the government, maternal healthcare services utilization is far below the recommended level in Ethiopia with a high urban-rural disparity. Currently, two-thirds of pregnant women do not receive the recommended number of antenatal care, more than 50% of births are not attended by skilled birth attendants, and two-thirds of postpartum women do not receive postnatal checks, according to the 2019 EDHS report. There is also evidence that the rate of continuity of maternity care completion is low, implying that pregnant women are not getting the most out of the existing healthcare services. In Ethiopia, the rural communities are scattered over a wide geographic area some with difficult mountains and valleys. Hence, geographic barriers and limited information sources are likely to influence women's access to skilled birth attendance. As part of improving access and overcoming physical or geographical inaccessibility in rural areas, maternity waiting homes; residential lodgings built near healthcare facilities where expectant women near or at term would stay till the onset of labor is one of the measures taken by the Ethiopian government. The majority of the rural populations commonly have a lower perception of health services in general, and many traditional practices support behaviors that are inconsistent with effective health interventions. Thus, there is a challenge concerning behavior (social norms, beliefs, and culture) from the demand side related to utilizing maternity services on top of non/partial functionality of existing waiting homes. Therefore, this research project aimed at promoting access to and utilization of maternal healthcare services utilization in southern Ethiopia.

NCT ID: NCT05332093 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Cutaneous Leishmaniases

Spatial Analysis of Host-parasite Interactions in Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Ethiopia

SpatialCL
Start date: March 21, 2022
Phase:
Study type: Observational [Patient Registry]

Cutaneous leishmaniasis manifestations range from self-healing localized skin ulcers/nodules to diffusely spread chronic lesions. Knowledge on the host-parasite interactions underpinning the different clinical presentations is scarce, in particular for L. aethiopica infections where disease can be extremely severe. Our aim is to define differences in skin immune responses and parasite virulence in CL patients at single cell/parasite level and how it underpins the different clinical presentations (localised, mucocutaneous and diffuse), by producing the first spatially-resolved 'ecological' map of the lesions.

NCT ID: NCT05286359 Not yet recruiting - Malaria Clinical Trials

Performance Evaluation of Malaria Plus Rapid Diagnostic Tests (RDTs) for the Detection of Plasmodium Infections in Patients With Symptoms Suggestive of Malaria

Start date: April 2022
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This trial is part of a portfolio of studies designed to assess the clinical and operational performance of Abbott's NxTekTM Malaria Pf Plus and NxTekTM Malaria Pf/Pv Plus Rapid Test Devices.

NCT ID: NCT05270655 Not yet recruiting - Depression Clinical Trials

Cognitive-behavioural Intervention for Anxiety, Depression and Quality of Life Among Children Receiving Chemotherapy.

Start date: March 2022
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The diagnosis and treatment of paediatric cancer is the most stressful experience for children and their families. Nearly all paediatric cancer patients are presented with at least one psychosocial problem, of which, anxiety and depression often coexist and are most frequently reported. Poorly managed anxiety and depression causes emotional and behavioural problems, impairs relationships and functioning, decreases adhere to treatment, increases the burden of symptoms and significantly impacts quality of life and prognosis. Despite the high rates and negative impacts of anxiety and depression in paediatric oncology, they are poorly managed. Thus, to mitigate the burden of anxiety, depression and impaired quality of life, an age-appropriate cognitive-behavioural intervention shows promise when incorporated with the existing pharmacologic interventions. This study aims to test how effective cognitive-behavioural intervention is to improve anxiety, depression and quality of life of children during chemotherapy. The study will be conducted in two hospitals in Ethiopia and include 8-18-year-old children with haematological cancer receiving chemotherapy, able to communicate with the local language, Amharic, able to provide parental consent and child assent, and without history of developmental, psychological, psychiatric, hearing or speech problems. The study will enroll up to 80 participants and randomise them into two groups, one group will receive a cognitive-behavioural intervention and the the other group will receive the usual psychosocial care provided by staff nurses. Participants in the cognitive-behavioural intervention group will receive five sessions of individual face to face cognitive-behavioural intervention. Each session will last approximately 30-35 minutes a week and supplemented by home-based practices. This study will use different intervention delivery strategies including psychoeducation, guided discovery or Socratic questioning, discussion, drawing, painting or writing, and play depending on the content of each session and maturity of the child. The levels of anxiety, depression and quality of life will be measured before the intervention, after the intervention and one month after completion of the intervention in both groups.

NCT ID: NCT05254717 Active, not recruiting - Anemia Clinical Trials

Effect of Soaking Complementary Foods Flour on Hemoglobin Concentration, Anthropometric Deficits and Episode of Diarrheal, Cough and Fever Morbidities

Start date: November 1, 2021
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Removing anti nutrient factors using simple cost-effective and sustainable household methods to improve nutritional status of children in communities were plant based complementary foods are the main source of Nutrients is highly recommended. Therefore, the aim of this study is to determine effect of soaking complementary foods on hemoglobin, nutritional and health status of children 6-23 months in agrarian community of bale zone.

NCT ID: NCT05208723 Active, not recruiting - Clinical trials for Stress, Psychological

Addressing Stress Amongst Female Entrepreneurs in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: a Pilot Study

DWMTS
Start date: July 17, 2021
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The overall objective of this study is to evaluate the impact of the "Doing What Matters in Times of Stress Guided Self-Help" handbook along with lay helper session on managing stress and emotion on mental distress and well-being. If successful, the study will assess its impact on business performance among women entrepreneurs in Ethiopia.

NCT ID: NCT05175794 Recruiting - Tuberculosis Clinical Trials

Triage Test for All Oral DR-TB Regimen (TRiAD Study)

Start date: May 26, 2022
Phase:
Study type: Observational

A Phase 4 operational study to assess the effectiveness, feasibility, acceptability, and cost effectiveness of the GeneXpert MTB/XDR (Xpert XDR; Cepheid) assay for rapid triage-and-treatment of DR-TB-A multi-centre, multi-country prospective cohort study

NCT ID: NCT05173454 Recruiting - Breastfeeding Clinical Trials

Effect of Breastfeeding Education and Support Provided to Male Partners on Optimal Breastfeeding Practice in Ethiopia

Start date: April 14, 2022
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Optimal breastfeeding practices are essential for child survival, growth, development, and for the health of mothers. Globally, optimal breastfeeding practices are still low and breastfeeding practices are not optimal in Ethiopia. Male partners have an important but often neglected role in the promotion of breastfeeding practices and currently, male partners are not targeted in breastfeeding education provided by health care providers. The effect of breastfeeding interventions delivered to male partners on optimal breastfeeding has not been studied in the Ethiopian context. It is important to investigate breastfeeding promotion education and support provided to male partners compared to the usual care effective in improving optimal breastfeeding practice in lactating mothers. Therefore, in this study cluster-randomized controlled trials will be conducted to evaluate the effect of breastfeeding education and support provided to male partners on optimal breastfeeding practice in Ethiopia.