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NCT ID: NCT03251664 Completed - Anemia Clinical Trials

Food Groups Associated With Anaemia in Pregnant Women

Start date: October 1, 2015
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational [Patient Registry]

This study investigates the association between locally consumed food items with anemia among pregnant women, in Addis Ababa city, Ethiopia.

NCT ID: NCT03229629 Recruiting - Malnutrition Clinical Trials

What Promotes Healthy Eating? The Roles of Information,Affordability,Accessibility,Gender, and Peers on Food Consumption

Start date: June 25, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Pre-school undernutrition is a global problem with life long adverse consequences. One form of undernutrition, chronic undernutrition or stunting, affects 171 million children under the age of 5 worldwide. 35% of these children live in Africa. In Ethiopia, the focus of this study, in 2014, 44.5% of children under 5 were stunted. Stunting is the consequence of several factors including low birth weights, sub-optimal infant and complementary feeding practices and repeated illness. In Ethiopia, complementary feeding is sub-optimal; only 4% of children aged 6-24 months met the minimum dietary diversity recommended by WHO. The investigators hypothesize four main reasons why many children and mothers in Ethiopia fall short of best practice in terms of meeting nutritional needs and providing appropriate childcare. (i) Lack of information on healthy eating and appropriate child-feeding practices; (ii) Limited affordability; (iii) Limited accessibility to markets and diverse food items; and (iv) Limited peer effects in spreading information and adopting new practices. This study will assess the efficacy of the interventions that address these four barriers to optimal complementary feeding practices in Ethiopia. Using a cluster randomized control design, mother-father-child pairs in two localities, Holeta and Ejere will be enrolled. Treatment will be randomized at the garee (village) level. There will be five treatment arms and a control group: T1, weekly maternal nutrition BCC sessions for four months; T2, weekly maternal nutrition BCC sessions for four months and weekly paternal nutrition BCC sessions for three months; T3, receipt of a food voucher for six months; T4, weekly maternal nutrition BCC sessions for four months and receipt of a food voucher for six months; T5 weekly maternal nutrition BCC sessions for four months and weekly paternal nutrition BCC sessions for three months and receipt of a food voucher for six months; and C, a control group. Within household, recipient of voucher (mother or father) will be randomly selected.

NCT ID: NCT03152227 Recruiting - Health Behavior Clinical Trials

Nutrition-sensitive Agricultural Interventions for Ethiopia

ATONU
Start date: November 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This study aims at evaluating the impact of integrating nutrition sensitive behavioral change communication (BCC) in the context of increased household production of chicken and eggs on women and children diet.

NCT ID: NCT03135080 Active, not recruiting - Surgery Clinical Trials

The Effect of Long-Term HEAD START Training on Surgical Skill Levels

Start date: May 17, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The research group developed a surgical simulation device, the Human Eyelid Analogue Device for Surgical Training And skill Reinforcement in Trachoma (HEAD START), to bridge the gap between classroom and live-surgery training specifically for trichiasis surgery. In most settings, HEAD START is utilized once during training, then surgeons move on to live surgery and typically do not return to the simulator. The research team is interested in determining whether HEAD START provides benefit for long-term trichiasis surgery training, since many surgeons operate seasonally, with long periods of downtime between surgical camps and with little field supervision. Participating surgeons will practice on HEAD START weekly, with monthly feedback from a senior supervisor. Researchers will assess their skill level at the start of HEAD START training and again at the start of the new surgical season in the fall of 2017. Researchers will also administer questionnaires to elicit feedback on the HEAD START training and supervision process.

NCT ID: NCT03129646 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Visceral Leishmaniasis

Miltefosine/Paromomycin Phase III Trial for Treatment of Primary Visceral Leishmaniasis (VL) Patients in Eastern Africa

Start date: August 1, 2017
Phase: Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

This is an open label, Phase III, randomized, controlled, parallel arm multicentre non-inferiority clinical trial to compare the efficacy and safety of two combination regimens of Miltefosine and Paromomycin with the standard SSG-PM for the treatment of primary adult and children VL patients in Eastern Africa.

NCT ID: NCT03100747 Recruiting - Surgery Clinical Trials

Maximizing Trichiasis Surgery Success

MTSS
Start date: April 5, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of this study is to determine whether the rate of post-operative trachomatous trichiasis differs significantly between bilamellar tarsal rotation surgery with an incision height of 3mm, bilamellar tarsal rotation surgery with an incision height of 5 mm, and Trabut surgery.

NCT ID: NCT03075436 Recruiting - Mental Well-being Clinical Trials

The Impact of Enhanced, Demand-side Sanitation and Hygiene Promotion on Sustained Behavior Change and Health in Ethiopia

Start date: March 7, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This study is a two-year evaluation investigating the impacts of an enhanced, demand-side sanitation and hygiene intervention on sustainable adoption of improved water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) practices and mental well-being.

NCT ID: NCT03067558 Terminated - Pneumonia Childhood Clinical Trials

Acute Respiratory Infection Diagnostic Aids (ARIDA) Controlled Accuracy Evaluation Protocol

Start date: April 5, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

Pneumonia is the leading infectious cause of death among children under 5 years of age globally. Many pneumonia deaths result from late care seeking and inappropriate treatment due to misdiagnosis of symptoms. The United Nations Children's Fund's (UNICEF's) Acute Respiratory Infection Diagnostic Aids (ARIDA) project aims to introduce automated respiratory rate (RR) counting aids for use by frontline health workers in resource limited community settings and health facilities. These RR counting aids aim to offer improved accuracy, effectiveness and acceptability compared to current practices for counting and classifying RR to detect fast breathing pneumonia. The general aim of the controlled accuracy study is to understand whether the ARIDA test device accurately measures RR in children under 5 years of age with cough and/or difficult breathing. It is a cross-sectional, prospective study in a controlled setting comprising three types of device evaluations: 1. The accuracy of the ARIDA test device in measuring RR in young infants 0 to <2months, children 2 to <12 months and 12 to 59 months when compared to a video panel reference standard will be established through the first evaluation. 2. The consistency of the ARIDA test device will be established by determining the level of agreement between the measures of RR for two ARIDA test devices when used on the same child at the same time in those aged 2 to <12 months and 12 to 59 months through the second evaluation. 3. A third evaluation on a different group of normal-breathing children aged 2 to 59 months will assess RR fluctuation over time due to ARIDA test device attachment. Evaluations 1 and 2 for accuracy and consistency will also be undertaken with expert clinicians (EC) conducting a manual RR count to further the evidence base around the performance of current standard practice in a controlled setting. The study is a cross-sectional, prospective study and will be conducted in paediatric in and outpatient departments Saint Paul's Hospital and Millennium Medical Collage in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

NCT ID: NCT03065920 Recruiting - Severe Asthma Clinical Trials

African Severe Asthma Program: A Research Network for Characterisation of Severe Asthma in Africans (ASAP)

ASAP
Start date: April 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational [Patient Registry]

This study is a prospective observational multicentre cohort study of asthma patients in Eastern Africa whose objectives will be; The primary objective of this project is to identify and characterize severe asthma in Eastern Africa in order to understand its demographic, clinical, physiologic, pathologic, genomic and immunologic determinants. Secondary objective(s) are; Compare the annual healthcare utilisation (HCU) (emergency room visits, hospitalization including admission to critical care units and unscheduled outpatient clinic or office visits), exacerbation, quality of life and mortality rates of severe and not- severe asthma patients Determine the factors associated with the asthma HCU events, quality of life, exacerbations and mortality The study will enroll 1676 patients aged between 12 and 70 years and follow up each patient for up to one year.

NCT ID: NCT03044899 Completed - Surgery Clinical Trials

African Surgical Outcomes Study (ASOS)

ASOS
Start date: February 1, 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational [Patient Registry]

STUDY OBJECTIVE To confirm the incidence of in-hospital postoperative complications in adult surgical patients in Africa. STUDY DESIGN Seven day, African national multi-centre prospective observational cohort study of adult (≥18 years) patients undergoing surgery. Patients will be followed up for a maximum of 30 days. We will follow the original International Surgical Outcomes Study (ISOS) study design. The primary outcome is in-hospital postoperative complications in adult surgical patients in Africa. Secondary outcomes include in-hospital mortality and the relationship between postoperative complications and postoperative mortality. The intention is to present a representative sample of surgical outcomes across all African countries. This study will run between February and March 2016.