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Accidental Fall clinical trials

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NCT ID: NCT04751097 Not yet recruiting - Accidental Fall Clinical Trials

The iCARE Feasibility Study

iCARE
Start date: June 1, 2021
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Conducting assessment lower limb muscle strength, power and joint range of movement as well as inertial measurement unit (IMU) data capture during periods of walking and activities of daily living (sit to stand, stand to sit, climbing stairs) in participants over the age of 65. Assessing to see if there is any correlation between prospective follow up for incidence of fall events and patterns observed in the IMU data of the subject and to assess if the IMU data observed that results in higher or lower incidence of falls is related to any particular pattern in lower limb muscle strength, power and joint range of movement data.

NCT ID: NCT04733222 Recruiting - Accidental Fall Clinical Trials

Effect of Treadmill Perturbation Training on Falls

Start date: April 1, 2021
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This parallel, randomized, controlled trial aims to quantify the effects of slip- and trip-perturbation training on fall rates collected over 12 months, compared to time-matched treadmill walking, among community-dwelling older adults (≥65 years). A sample size calculation estimated that 128 older community-dwelling older adults (≥65 years) are needed. Following baseline measures, the recruited participants will randomly be assigned to either the perturbation or the walking group. The participants in the perturbation group will be assigned to four perturbation training sessions. The walking group will perform four treadmill walking matching the exercise time of the perturbation training. Assessment of the primary outcome, fall rates, will be conducted continuously in 12 months from randomization. When a fall is reported in the fall calendar, a telephone interview will be conducted to assess the circumstances and consequences (e.g., fall-related fractures, fall-related hospital admissions) of the falls. Moreover, assessment of physical, cognitive, and social-psychological outcomes will be made at baseline, post-test, six-month, and 12-months reassessment.

NCT ID: NCT04717258 Not yet recruiting - Quality of Life Clinical Trials

Safe and Well Visits by the Fire and Rescue Service to Prevent Falls and Improve Quality of Life in Older People

FIREFLI
Start date: March 1, 2021
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

FIREFLI is a large, pragmatic, individually randomised, controlled trial with embedded economic and qualitative evaluations. The aim of the research is to see whether Safe and Well Visits delivered by the Fire and Rescue Service will lead to a reduction in the number of falls and an improvement in health-related quality of life in older people. It will also look at the cost-effectiveness of the intervention and explore the acceptability of the Safe and Well Visits to older people and the Fire and Rescue Service. The investigators will recruit 1156 participants, randomly divided into two equal groups. One group (the intervention group) will receive the Safe and Well Visit at the beginning of the study and the other group (the control group) will receive the visit at the end of the study. The investigators will collect the number of falls people have using monthly falls calendars and follow up other outcomes by questionnaires at four, eight and 12 months post-randomisation. The investigators will also undertake interviews with some participants and with Fire and Rescue Service staff to explore experiences around the Safe and Well Visits. Two Studies within a Trial (SWAT) will be carried out to investigate more efficient ways of running trials. The first will test if using a recruitment invitation letter informed by Self-Determination Theory will increase the number of participants who take part in the study. The second will test if including a pen with the reminder four-month questionnaire will increase the number of postal questionnaires returned to the study team.

NCT ID: NCT04620421 Suspended - Accidental Fall Clinical Trials

Effect of Rhythm-based Multitask Training on Falls Among Older Adults

RYMA
Start date: February 1, 2021
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

In this assessor-blinded, randomized, controlled trial our primary aim is to quantify the effects of a six-month rhythm-based multitask training (RYMA) intervention on fall rates collected over 12 months, compared to continuation of regular activity schedule, among community-dwelling older adults (≥70 years). This assessor-blinded, randomized, controlled trial aim is to quantify the effects of six-month rhythm-based multitask training (RYMA) on fall rates collected over 12 months, compared to continuation of regular activity schedule, among community-dwelling older adults (≥70 years). A sample size calculation estimates that 126 older community-dwelling older adults (≥70 years) are needed. Following baseline measures, the recruited participants will randomly be assigned to either the RYMA or the control group. The participants in the RYMA group will be assigned to a single weekly one-hour session for six months, while the control group will be encouraged to continue their regular activity schedule. Assessment of the primary outcome, fall rates, will be conducted continuously in 12 months from the beginning of training using monthly fall calendars. When a fall is reported in the fall calendar, a telephone interview will be conducted to assess circumstances and consequences (e.g. fall-related fractures, fall-related hospital admissions) of the falls. Moreover, assessment of physical, cognitive, and social-psychological surrogate outcomes will be made at baseline, six, and 12 months.

NCT ID: NCT04367298 Recruiting - Accidental Fall Clinical Trials

Chronoprevention in Hospital Falls of Older People

CHRONOFALLS
Start date: January 1, 2018
Phase:
Study type: Observational [Patient Registry]

Accidental falls in hospitals are serious events concerning the safety of the patients. Recent studies demonstrated that the time of falls is a key factor to be considered in prevention. It has been shown that the time of day, the day of the week and the month of the year impact on the occurrence of falls. The aim of this project is to know the effect of the application of a program of preventive measures based on the temporal patterns of the risk factors on the hospital fall occurrence. A mixed method research design will be conducted. Three phases will be carry out: 1) Longitudinal prospective study in two parts: a) audits and seminars of health professionals focused on an effective and efficient hospital falls register. Cosinor and Multi-Component analyses will be performed to obtain temporal patterns of the hospital falls and their related variables. b) Implementation of a based-temporal patterns, multidimensional prevention program. 2) Retrospective study of falls registered in institutional databases. 3) Qualitative study based on focus groups (physicians, nurses and nursing assistants). It is imperative to study temporal patterns of hospital falls to effectively and comprehensively define the etiology of falls, and therefore, design preventive strategies. A reduction of the number of in-hospital falls and related injuries is expected, as well as, an improvement of the quality of life of patients. Considering temporal patterns, and levels of mood and sleep of healthcare professionals will achieve an improvement of patient safety.

NCT ID: NCT04313062 Not yet recruiting - Accidental Fall Clinical Trials

Falling Prevention Comprehensive Model for Older People Self-caring

PMACTIVAS
Start date: April 2020
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Falls in elderly people are a public health problem and in Chile there's a deficit regarding prevention strategies focused on high functioning older people who live in the community. The aim of the study is to design, implement and evaluate a comprehensive model based on house calls and oriented towards falling prevention (PM ACTIVAS' model). We will perform a clinical trial in a district of Santiago, Chile to evaluate this model. Our hypothesis are that people who received the educational intervention following the PM ACTIVAS' model will: fall less frequently, improve their management on falls risk factors present at home, and have a higher falls risk perception than the control group. We also expect that it will be possible to establish cut off points in a valid and reliable scale to assess the presence of falls risk factors in elderly people.

NCT ID: NCT04308239 Completed - Accidental Fall Clinical Trials

Reactive Balance Training Targeting Both Slip- and Trip-Induced Falls

Start date: June 1, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The goal of this study was to evaluate the effects of reactive balance training (RBT) targeting slipping and tripping on laboratory-induced slips and trips. In an effort to build upon prior work, the present study included: 1) a control group receiving an alternative balance training intervention; 2) separate training and assessment sessions; 3) alternative RBT methods that may be more amenable to work outside the lab compared to prior methods, and 4) older adult participants receiving individualized training to reduce drop-out. The investigators hypothesized that slips after RBT would result in improved reactive balance kinematics, and a lower incidence of falls, compared to either initial slips before any intervention or after a control intervention. The investigators also hypothesized that trips after RBT would result in improved reactive balance kinematics, and a lower incidence of falls, compared to either initial trips before any intervention or after a control intervention. Results were intended to contribute to knowledge regarding the efficacy of alternative methods for RBT, and provide additional evidence regarding its efficacy.

NCT ID: NCT04294342 Active, not recruiting - Accidental Fall Clinical Trials

The Impact of Specifically Adapted Judo-based Training Program on Risk Factors for Falls Among Adults

J4BA
Start date: May 1, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This is a control study with a 2-group pretest-posttest design investigating the effects of a 10-week judo-inspired exercise program (Judo4Balance) for physical functions, self-efficacy, activity level, and fall techniques among working adults & part-time working retired people. Falls constitute a common and severe threat to older men and women's health worldwide. However, falls are not just a problem of advanced age, studies have been reporting that falls are a problem at all ages. Nevertheless, falls are under-studied, particularly among young and middle-aged adults (working age adults). For all fall-related injuries among adults, the proportions have been reported to be 32.3% among older adults, 35.3% among middle-aged adults, and 32.3% among younger adults in the United States. This indicates that falls and fall related injuries represent a significant threat to public health at all ages. Therefore, new innovative ways of prevention is much needed and needs to be studied.

NCT ID: NCT04181658 Active, not recruiting - Aging Clinical Trials

The Brain Stimulation and Physical Therapy Study

Start date: October 22, 2019
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This pilot work will determine the feasibility of tDCS intervention as an effective adjunct intervention to PT aimed at improving gait, balance, and mobility in older adults at risk of falling.

NCT ID: NCT04139642 Active, not recruiting - Postural Balance Clinical Trials

Standing Balance as the Fifth Vital Sign in Clinical Setting

Start date: March 2, 2020
Phase:
Study type: Observational [Patient Registry]

This 18-month prospective, observational study involving real world data will determine if the use of a standing scale that delivers a quantitative measure of standing balance along with weight (balance + weight) in place of a scale that only delivers weight (weight only) influences clinical decision making by health care practitioners in the ambulatory outpatient setting. Providers will be randomized to receive the balance+weight scale or weight-only scale for 9 months, then to crossover and receive the other for 9 months. The primary outcome measures are (1) providers' self-reported perceptions of whether the balance measurement influences their clinical decision making and (2) the rate of performing falls risk assessments or referring to a specialist for evaluation and treatment based on aggregate billing data. The secondary outcome measure is qualitative interviews with practitioners regarding their perceptions on the utility and barriers to using the device.