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Fractures, Bone clinical trials

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NCT ID: NCT03705962 Recruiting - Fractures, Open Clinical Trials

Locally Applied Antibiotics for Infection Prophylaxis in Treatment of Open Fractures

Start date: July 2015
Phase: Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

The primary objective of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of local antibiotic versus placebo in the prevention of infections in open fractures. The study will assess whether local treatment of open fractures with the antibiotic tobramycin (in addition to standard systemic antibiotics) will decrease the risk and rate of infection, and rate of re-operation. This will be studied using a randomized controlled clinical trial design in adult population of age 18-70 years who present with open fractures. About 133 subjects will be recruited in this study at UVA.

NCT ID: NCT03696199 Not yet recruiting - Ankle Fractures Clinical Trials

Randomized Controlled Trial for Ankle Fracture Pain Control

Start date: October 1, 2018
Phase: Phase 4
Study type: Interventional

This project is a multicenter, three armed, prospective randomized control trial studying the effectiveness of a long-acting local anesthetic "cocktail" in patients undergoing operative fixation of ankle fractures.

NCT ID: NCT03695497 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Femoral Neck Fractures

Direct Anterior Approach for Femoral Neck Fractures

Start date: October 1, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The primary objective is to examine if in patients with a dislocated femoral neck fracture who receive a total hip arthroplasty, direct anterior approach will give a better result in terms of mobilization, function and pain in the first weeks and months postoperatively, than direct lateral approach.

NCT ID: NCT03695081 Recruiting - Aging Clinical Trials

Patient Pathway Pharmacist - Optimal Drug-related Care

Start date: September 3, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Medication errors represent the most common cause of patient injury and one of the most frequently reported health related deviation in Norway. The addition of a dedicated clinical pharmacist throughout the hip fracture patient pathway (patient pathway pharmacist) is believed to improve patient safety and ensure optimal drug-related patient care. The pharmacist will perform medication reconciliation at admission to hospital, medication review after surgery and assist physicians with discharge summary. Six weeks after discharge the patient pathway pharmacist will perform a second drug reconciliation and medication review. This study will assess the pharmacists' place and specific tasks in the patient pathway, describe areas where the pharmacist contribute to increased quality of care and assess the benefits and/or disadvantages experienced with introducing a patient pathway pharmacist. The estimated number of patients included is 60. Current practice will be determined by investigating the last 50 patients' medical record and a questionnaire to health care professionals involved in treatment of hip fracture patients. Data from medication reconciliation and drug review will be collected and compared to current practice. After the inclusion period, focus group surveys and/or semi-structured interviews will be executed to describe the perceived improvement in the quality of care. Primary endpoints are: 1) Medication reconciliation score at admission 2) Number of inappropriate drugs for elderly 3) Discharge summary score 4) Discharge summaries following procedure. Secondary endpoints are readmissions and mortality after 30 and 90 days. Qualitative endpoints: 1) Health care professionals experience of current drug-related practice 2) Experienced advantages and disadvantages of a patient pathway pharmacist.

NCT ID: NCT03694457 Not yet recruiting - Humeral Fracture Clinical Trials

Comparison Between Anterior Approach (Deltopectoral) and Lateral Approach (Deltoid Splitting) in Shoulder Reverse Arthroplasty for Proximal Humerus Fracture

DELTOPSUPEX
Start date: November 2, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The aim of the study consists in comparing two surgical approaches (deltopectoral versus lateral deltoid splitting) in the treatment of proximal humerus fractures treated with a reversed total shoulder arthroplasty The assessment will focus on clinical (clinical scores, efficacy, safety…) and radiological results, between these two types of surgical approaches by using a prospective, randomized analysis.

NCT ID: NCT03692260 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Minimally Displaced Mandibular Angle Fracture

Fracture Gap After Herbert Screw Insertion by 3d Stents Vs Titanium Plate(Minimally Displaced Mandibular Angle Fracture)

Start date: September 27, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

interfragmentary gap measurement using Herbert cannulated headless screw using a 3D surgical customized template versus titanuim plate

NCT ID: NCT03689335 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Closed Fracture of Shaft of Humerus

HUmeral Shaft Fracture FIXation Study

HU-FIX
Start date: September 17, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Fractures of the humeral shaft (upper arm bone) account for approximately 1% of all adult fractures in the United Kingdom. Historically, these injuries have been treated using a cast and/or brace, with immediate surgical fixation reserved for severely- or multiply-injured patients. However, treatment with a brace is associated with several important problems, including poor alignment of the healed bones and shoulder/elbow stiffness. The brace is usually worn for up to 3 months, which interferes with patients' everyday activities and sleeping, and can predispose to skin problems. For 10-15% of patients treated with a brace, their fracture will not heal and will require surgery several months after the original injury, which is more difficult and carries a higher risk of complications. Recent studies suggest that undertaking immediate surgical fixation more often could improve healing and functional outcome for patients with humeral shaft fractures. The only published randomised controlled trial (RCT) to date showed no difference in clinical outcome between conservative and operative management; unfortunately, however, the operative technique used was unusual and would be considered highly suboptimal in most Western countries. This study will include adult patients (≥16 years), with capacity to consent and complete post-operative questionnaires in English, presenting to a single Orthopaedic trauma unit. Participants will be randomised to either non-operative treatment (with a brace) or operative treatment (i.e. surgical fixation). The investigators will assess whether there is a difference between the groups in terms of patient-reported outcome scores, fracture healing, complications, pain and return to work/sport over a one-year follow-up period. Participants will be enrolled into the study after obtaining informed consent. Following randomisation (to either non-operative treatment or surgical fixation), participants will then be reviewed at several defined timepoints, with a combination of clinical examination, X-rays and patient-reported outcome scores. The investigators hope that study results will enable surgeons to make better-informed decisions when managing patients with humeral shaft fractures.

NCT ID: NCT03682328 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Osteoporotic Fracture of Vertebra

Vertebroplasty and Kyphoplasty in Osteoporotic Vertebral Body Fractures.

Start date: October 1, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Vertebral body fractures are a major health care problem in all countries with incidence 1.4%. They are a common cause of severe debilitating pain, with consequent deteriorated quality of life, physical function and psychosocial performance. Surgery is indicated in patients with vertebral body fracture, and concurrent spinal instability or neurologic deficit. The cornerstone of management for vertebral body fractures without neurological impairment is medical therapy, which include analgesics, bed rest, orthoses and rehabilitation. In the majority of patients such treatment modalities are effective. However, conservative management measures are not indicated for every type of fracture. For example, in older patients with vertebral fractures and cardio-respiratory disease it is not possible to prescribe bedrest for long period. Moreover, sometimes anti-inflammatory drugs are poorly tolerated by older patients, and bed rest can lead to further demineralization of the vertebrae, predisposing to future fractures. Percutaneous minimally invasive vertebral augmentation methods for cement application into the vertebral body are a useful tool for the management of symptomatic fractures without neurological impairment when conventional measures of treatment can not be adopted. Two different percutaneous minimally invasive vertebral augmentation methods for cement application into the vertebral body for the management of symptomatic vertebral body fractures without neurological impairment have been developed, namely vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty. Kyphoplasty and vertebroplasty have gained wide acceptance worldwide to manage patients without neurological impairment suffering from unmanageable pain caused by vertebral body fractures. Both procedures depend on mechanical stabilization of the fracture produced by cement injection into the fractured vertebral body. Cement augmentation of the vertebral body by vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty was originally introduced for osteoporotic compression fractures, but surgeons have now applied these techniques as a method of enhancing anterior column support while avoiding the morbidity and complications associated with anterior approaches. The mainstay of the controversy between kyphoplasty and vertebroplasty are height restoration, whether or not this height restoration is clinically significant, and the risks related to height restoration.

NCT ID: NCT03679481 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Blood Loss Following Open Femur Fracture Surgery

The Effect of Tranexamic Acid on Blood Loss and Transfusion Requirements Following Open Femur Fracture Surgery

Start date: December 1, 2018
Phase: Phase 4
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of tranexamic acid (TXA) on blood loss and transfusion requirements in patients with femur fractures requiring open surgical approaches.

NCT ID: NCT03673865 Not yet recruiting - Orbital Fractures Clinical Trials

The Use of 3D Printing in Orbital Fractures

Start date: September 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The study is a prospective randomized longitudinal clinical study to compare pre-adapted patient-specific orbital implants utilizing an office-based 3-D printer versus standard non-adapted orbital implants (the latter being the traditional approach and current standard of care).