Clinical Trials Logo

Accidents, Traffic clinical trials

View clinical trials related to Accidents, Traffic.

Filter by:
  • None
  • Page 1

NCT ID: NCT02858544 Completed - Brain Injuries Clinical Trials

Concussion in Motor Vehicle Accidents: The Concussion Identification Index

CIDI
Start date: November 2013
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

The primary goal of this study is to provide clinicians with a brief, patient self-administer instrument yielding a single composite score that reliably correlates with objective findings on standardized neurocognitive assessment for concussion.

NCT ID: NCT02695888 Active, not recruiting - Adolescent Clinical Trials

Mobile Technology Monitoring System to Assess a Web-based Intervention for Teen Risky Driving

Start date: March 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This research study examines the feasibility of using an in-vehicle mobile technology monitoring system to measure teen secondary task engagement during on-road driving as the outcome measure for a web-based intervention to prevent risky driving in novice teen drivers.

NCT ID: NCT02319317 Completed - Adolescent Clinical Trials

Web-based Intervention to Prevent Risky Driving

Start date: April 2015
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The specific aim of this study is to assess the feasibility of a web-based intervention to prevent risky driving with teen drivers licensed in the previous 90 days.

NCT ID: NCT01733537 Completed - Accidents, Traffic Clinical Trials

Improving Motorcycle Taxi Driver Visibility in Tanzania

Start date: February 2013
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of this study is to determine whether providing motorcycle taxi drivers with a free reflective fluorescent vest will result in increased use of reflective or fluorescent clothing compared to education about wearing reflective or fluorescent clothing alone.

NCT ID: NCT01652274 Completed - Accidents, Traffic Clinical Trials

Level of Knowledge and Habitual Concepts of Turkish Parents on Child Passenger Safety

Start date: June 2012
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

It is well known that traffic accidents are one of the major reasons for death in childhood. Unfortunately scientific and statistical data usually comes from developed countries. In this study, the investigators will try to evaluate Turkish families' knowledge on Child Passenger Safety, observe how they carry their babies in the car and investigated the reasons behind the undesired behaviors.

NCT ID: NCT01619202 Completed - Clinical trials for Prevention Harmful Effects

Comparing Driving Performance Among Trained and Untrained Drivers Using a Driving Simulator

Start date: June 2012
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of this study is to examine differences in driving performance on a simulated driving assessment between novice teen drivers who receive the Risk Anticipation-Perception Training (RAPT) program and novice teen drivers who do not receive the training program.

NCT ID: NCT00300859 Not yet recruiting - Accidents, Traffic Clinical Trials

Brief Intervention to Increase Safety Belt Use Among ED Patients

Start date: February 2006
Phase: Phase 4
Study type: Interventional

DESCRIPTION (adapted from applicant's abstract): Injury control experts suggest that consistent SBU is the most effective means for motorists to reduce1he risk of death or serious injury in a crash. Sadly, the SBU prevalence among Massachusetts' residents is among the lowest in the nation. In accord with Healthy People 2010, Objective 15-19, and the CDC's Injury Research Agenda, the investigator will test the utility of a brief intervention to increase SBU among ED patients with self-reported SBU that IS less than "always". A secondary aim is to determine if the brief intervention is more effective among persons being treated for a motor vehicle crash (MVC)-related injury during a "teachable moment" than other non-injured ED patients receiving the same intervention. The research staff will systematically sample ED patients, screening for SBU among eligible participants during a 3-month period. Upon obtaining verbal consent, researchers will ask participants to complete a self-administered screening form on health and safety issues, including SBU. Patients that screen positive, (i.e., give an answer of less than "always use" safety belts) on a SBU screening question will be asked to participate in an intervention to promote health and safety among ED patients. Participants will be reimbursed for their time, and asked to do the following: to give written informed consent via IRB-approved forms and a HIPAA release form; complete an intake form, and agree to a follow-up phone interview at 3 and 6 months post-enrollment. Participants will be randomized into one of two groups: an Intervention Group that will receive a brief intervention designed to increase SBU, and a Control Group that will receive only standard care. Research staff will contact participants for a follow-up phone survey at 3 and 6 months to test the hypothesis that individuals randomized to the Intervention Group will have a higher self-reported SBU than those in the Control Group that received only standard care. Likewise, for the secondary (exploratory) analysis, the hypothesis is that among those treated for MVC-related trauma--and randomized to the intervention group--will have a higher self-reported SBU than others with non MVC-related trauma due to a greater receptivity to brief intervention techniques during the ED visit (i.e. the "teachable moment").

NCT ID: NCT00062829 Completed - Health Behavior Clinical Trials

Young Driver Intervention Study: Preventing Motor Vehicle Crashes

Start date: September 1998
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a program designed to reduce teen crashes and risky driving by increasing parental monitoring and restriction of their adolescents' driving practices during the first year of licensed driving.