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Brain Injuries clinical trials

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NCT ID: NCT03771950 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Traumatic Brain Injury

Early Team Based Neuro-rehabilitation After Traumatic Brain Injury - a Pilot Study

Start date: January 1, 2019
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The aim is to evaluate the study design, procedure and measurements in a randomised controlled pilot study.

NCT ID: NCT03770741 Not yet recruiting - Brain Injuries Clinical Trials

Safeguarding the Brain of Our Smallest Infants Phase III

SafeBoosC
Start date: April 15, 2019
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

the SafeBoosC-III trial investigates the benefit and harms of treatment based on near-infrared spectroscopy monitoring compared with treatment as usual. The hypothesis is that treatment based on near-infrared spectroscopy monitoring for extremely preterm infants during the first 72 hours of life will result in a reduction in severe brain injury or death at 36 weeks postmenstrual age.

NCT ID: NCT03766711 Recruiting - Cerebral Palsy Clinical Trials

VR Error Augmentation for Bimanual Task Exercise

FEATHERSv2
Start date: December 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This project is a continuing study from the FEATHERS project (NCT02290353) which focuses on developing novel home therapy program for persons with hemiparesis. This study will focus on examining motor behaviour and adaptation in neurodevelopmental hemiparesis (cerebral palsy, acquired brain injury (ABI)). New algorithms for motion control involved in encouraging active movement are developed and will be tested, but the study has the same therapeutic goal and focus as the original FEATHERS project of creating an engaging at-home bimanual upper limb training program. By incorporating existing gaming technology, we hope to discover novel ways to adapt commercial motion tracking controllers and visual feedback into engaging rehabilitative learning tools. This study will focus on a basic science aspect of human bimanual movements that can be incorporated into future applications of the full FEATHERS project devices. We believe that together these approaches will yield interventions that significantly improve functional ability and lead to improved quality of life.

NCT ID: NCT03766087 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Hypertension Intracranial

Decompressive Craniectomy for Severe Traumatic Brain Injury in Children With Refractory Intracranial Hypertension

RANDECPED
Start date: January 2019
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of mortality and severe disability in the pediatric population. The prognosis of these patients depends on the severity of the initial lesions but also on the effectiveness of the therapies used to prevent or at least limit secondary lesions mainly intracranial hypertension (HTIC). The medical therapeutic strategy for the control of HTIC in children with TBI is well codified: starting with hyperosmolar therapy, then hyperventilation and ultimately the use of barbiturates to deepen sedation. However, these therapies are not devoid of adverse effects (hypernatremia, cerebral hypoxemia, systemic vasodilation) and, for some, their efficacy is diminished over time. When these treatments are insufficient to lower intracranial pressure (ICP), decompressive craniectomy is proposed. Decompressive craniectomy is used in a well-coded manner in malignant ischemic stroke in adults. In TBI, to date, there are two randomized studies in adults and one in children but with a small number of patients, evaluating the benefit of decompressive craniectomy. None of them showed significantly superiority of the surgery compared to the maximal medication treatment on the functional prognosis in the medium term. However, these studies have many biases, including a significant cross-over from the conservative treatment group to the surgery arm. Nevertheless, the pediatric literature on the subject seems to yield better results on neurological prognosis in the long term. There are guidelines on the medical management of childhood TBI published by the National Institute of Health in 2012, which emphasize the need for controlled and randomized studies to define the place of decompressive craniectomy in children. That is why the investigators are proposing this national multicentre study.

NCT ID: NCT03761641 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Traumatic Brain Injury

Pilot Study of NeuroTriage Device in Patients With Potential Brain Injury and/or Impairment

Start date: March 2015
Phase:
Study type: Observational

This protocol is aimed at collecting oculomotor response data from a variety of brain injuries and impairments, and to secondarily evaluate the functionality and ease of use of the NeuroTriage device in the ED in patients with any presumed brain injury and/or impairment. For example, prior studies in adolescents with a concussion have shown that they tend to overshoot the pattern when asked to follow the movement of the lights in the binoculars

NCT ID: NCT03759808 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

Treatment for Patients With Chronic Post-Concussion Symptoms

Start date: December 1, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The current project will examine the effect of a brief psychological intervention on post-concussion symptoms, neurocognitive function, cerebral blood flow (CBF), and psychophysiological and salivary cortisol markers of autonomic nervous system (ANS) in a sample of 20 participants between 13-25 years of age who experience long-term post-concussive (PC) symptoms 2-9 months post-injury as well as 20 age- and sex-matched controls (non-injured) participants to provide normative data on all the above measures except for concussive symptoms.

NCT ID: NCT03754439 Recruiting - Brain Injuries Clinical Trials

Minimising the Adverse Physiological Effects of Transportation on the Premature Infant

TRiPs
Start date: October 31, 2018
Phase:
Study type: Observational

Centralisation of neonatal intensive care has led to an increase in postnatal inter-hospital transfers within the first 72 hours of life. Studies have shown transported preterm infants have an increased risk of intraventricular haemorrhage compared to inborns. The cause is likely multi-factorial, however, during the transportation process infants are exposed to noxious stimuli (excessive noise, vibration and temperature fluctuations), which may result in microscopic brain injury. However, there is a paucity of evidence to evaluate the effect of noise and vibration exposure during transportation. In this study the investigators aim to quantify the level of vibration and noise as experienced by a preterm infant during inter-hospital transportation in ground ambulance in the United Kingdom Secondary aims of the study are to: i) measure the physiological and biochemical changes that occur as a result of ambulance transportation (ii) quantify microscopic brain injury through measurement of urinary S100B and other biomarkers (iii) evaluate the development of intraventricular haemorrhage on cranial ultrasound iv) monitor vibration and sound exposure, using a prototype measuring system, during neonatal transport using both a manikin and a small cohort of neonatal patients. v) evaluate vibration and sound exposure levels using an updated transportation system modified to reduce effects.

NCT ID: NCT03754114 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Brain Injuries, Traumatic

Brain Oxygen Optimization in Severe TBI, Phase 3

BOOST3
Start date: March 1, 2019
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

BOOST3 is a randomized clinical trial to determine the comparative effectiveness of two strategies for monitoring and treating patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the intensive care unit (ICU). The study will determine the safety and efficacy of a strategy guided by treatment goals based on both intracranial pressure (ICP) and brain tissue oxygen (PbtO2) as compared to a strategy guided by treatment goals based on ICP monitoring alone. Both of these alternative strategies are used in standard care. It is unknown if one is more effective than the other. In both strategies the monitoring and goals help doctors adjust treatments including the kinds and doses of medications and the amount of intravenous fluids given, ventilator (breathing machine) settings, need for blood transfusions, and other medical care. The results of this study will help doctors discover if one of these methods is more safe and effective.

NCT ID: NCT03752697 Recruiting - Brain Injuries Clinical Trials

Metacognition in Neurological Injury

Start date: December 2018
Phase:
Study type: Observational

The purpose of this study is to investigate the trajectory of metacognitive functioning throughout phases of recovery from neurological insult, and to determine its relationship to rehabilitation compliance and functional outcome. It is hypothesized that metacognitive accuracy improves over time, and is a significant predictor of engagement in rehabilitation activities.

NCT ID: NCT03743805 Not yet recruiting - Cardiac Arrest Clinical Trials

Rapid Reversal of CNS-Depressant Drug Effect Prior to Brain Death Determination

Start date: January 1, 2019
Phase: Early Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

Current standard of care prior to determination of brain death in subjects with suspected anoxic brain injury is to exclude complicating medical conditions that may confound clinical assessment (such as severe electrolyte, acid base, endocrine or circulatory disturbance), achieve normothermia and normal systolic blood pressure over 100 mmHg (with or without vasopressor use), exclude the presence of neuromuscular blocking agents (with the presence of a train of 4 twitches with maximal ulnar nerve stimulation) as well as to exclude the presence of CNS depressant drug effects. At the present time the latter is done by history, drug screen and allowing enough time for paralytic and sedative drugs to be metabolized and cleared from the body. Clearance is calculated by using 5 times the drug's half-life assuming normal hepatic and renal functions. Half-life can also be prolonged in subjects who have been treated with induced hypothermia. Literature search revealed articles with general guidelines and approaches to brain death, but none addressed pharmacological reversal of sedative drugs