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Clinical Trial Summary

Oral mucositis (OM) is a significant side effect of cytotoxic anti-cancer chemotherapy and HN radiotherapy. CT-associated OM (CT-OM). It is the ulcerative phase that is most painful and associated with poor health outcomes. The sequelae of CT-OM, which include pain, odyno/dys-phagia, dysgeusia, decreased oral intake and systemic infection, frequently require treatment delays, interruptions, and discontinuations that not only negatively impact the quality of life but also tumor control and survivorship. To date, OM management is aimed to control symptoms through topical or systemic analgesics and topical application of barrier agents to cover injured mucosa as a salve or ointment. According to the recent MASCC/ISOO Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Management of Mucositis Secondary to Cancer Therapy, no guideline was possible regarding the use of saline or sodium bicarbonate rinses in the prevention or treatment of OM-CT in patients undergoing cancer therapy because of limited data. Ozone at low medical concentration, not included in MASCC guidelines, will be generally proven to induce a mild activation of protective anti-oxidant pathways, thus exerting therapeutic effects in many inflammatory diseases. Aim: to evaluate the effectiveness of a new protocol OZOCLO (alpha-lipoic acid, ozonated oil, and chlorhexidine [CHX] mouthwash) compared to sodium bicarbonate solution (Oral Basic Care- OBC) or chlorhexidine (CHX) mouthwash alone or to a binomial administration (AAL-OZ) of systemic alpha-lipoic acid and topical ozonated oil to reduce the incidence of OM (primary aim) and/or to postpone the beginning of oral mucositis (OM) and to reduce OM severity (secondary aims).


Clinical Trial Description

Oral mucositis (OM) is a significant side effect of cytotoxic anti-cancer chemotherapy and HN radiotherapy. CT-associated OM (CT-OM) begins in the submucosa and becomes clinically on the surface about 4 days after infusion: typical primary manifestations are erythema, mucosal atrophy, and sensitivity. The process continues to deteriorate mucosae, and ulceration occurs a few days later, peaking at 2 weeks and persisting for 1-2 weeks after which it typically resolves spontaneously. It is the ulcerative phase that is most painful and associated with poor health outcomes. The sequelae of CT-OM, which include pain, odyno/dys-phagia, dysgeusia, decreased oral intake and systemic infection, frequently require treatment delays, interruptions, and discontinuations that not only negatively impact the quality of life but also tumor control and survivorship. To date, OM management is aimed to control symptoms through topical or systemic analgesics and topical application of barrier agents to cover injured mucosa as a salve or ointment. Although the investigators reviewed a large body of evidence, there are still, clinical settings for which there is no recommended intervention. According to the recent MASCC/ISOO Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Management of Mucositis Secondary to Cancer Therapy, no guideline was possible regarding the use of saline or sodium bicarbonate rinses in the prevention or treatment of OM-CT in patients undergoing cancer therapy because of limited data. Despite the limited data available for both saline and sodium bicarbonate, the panel recognizes that these are inert, bland rinses that increase oral clearance, which may help maintain oral hygiene and improve patient comfort. Also, CHX is indicated because of concurrent oral infection and OM, it is acceptable to use it for the oral infection. Ozone at low medical concentration, not included in MASCC guidelines, will be generally proven to induce a mild activation of protective anti-oxidant pathways, thus exerting therapeutic effects in many inflammatory diseases. Aim: to evaluate the effectiveness of a new protocol OZOCLO (alpha-lipoic acid, ozonated oil, and chlorhexidine [CHX] mouthwash) compared to sodium bicarbonate solution (Oral Basic Care- OBC) or chlorhexidine (CHX) mouthwash alone or to a binomial administration (AAL-OZ) of systemic alpha-lipoic acid and topical ozonated oil to reduce the incidence of OM (primary aim) and/or to postpone the beginning of oral mucositis (OM) and to reduce OM severity (secondary aims). ;


Study Design


Related Conditions & MeSH terms


NCT number NCT05211622
Study type Interventional
Source University of Palermo
Contact Olga Di Fede, Professor
Phone +39 3294030298
Email [email protected]
Status Not yet recruiting
Phase Phase 4
Start date March 10, 2022
Completion date January 10, 2023