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Indolent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma clinical trials

View clinical trials related to Indolent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma.

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NCT ID: NCT05336409 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Indolent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

A Study of CNTY-101 in Participants With CD19-Positive B-Cell Malignancies

ELiPSE-1
Start date: December 2022
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

ELiPSE-1 is a Phase 1, multi-center, dose-finding study to evaluate the safety, pharmacokinetics, and preliminary efficacy of CNTY-101 in participants with relapsed or refractory cluster of differentiation (CD)19-positive B-cell malignancies.

NCT ID: NCT05265975 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma

A Study of ATG-010 in Combination With Lenalidomide and Rituximab (R2) in Adults With DLBCL and iNHL

SWATCH
Start date: April 7, 2022
Phase: Phase 1/Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

A Single-arm, Phase Ⅰ/Ⅱ Study Evaluating the Safety, Tolerability, and Preliminary Efficacy of ATG-010 in Combination with Lenalidomide and Rituximab (R2) in Adult Patients with Relapsed/Refractory DLBCL and iNHL Who are Ineligible for High-dose Chemotherapy (HDC) or Autologous Stem Cell Transplant (A SCT).

NCT ID: NCT05206357 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Indolent Non-hodgkin Lymphoma

Study of the Adverse Events and Change in Disease State of Pediatric Participants (and Young Adults Between the Ages of 18-25) With Relapsed/Refractory Aggressive Mature B-cell Neoplasms Receiving Subcutaneous (SC) Injections of Epcoritamab

Start date: May 9, 2022
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

The most common types of mature B-cell lymphomas (MBLs) in children are Burkitt lymphoma (BL) and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Initial treatment cures 90% - 95% of children with these malignancies, leaving a very small population of relapsed/refractory disease with a poor prognosis. The purpose of this study is to assess the safety and tolerability of epcoritamab in pediatric participants with relapsed/refractory aggressive mature B-cell neoplasms and young adult participants with Burkitt's or Burkitt-like lymphoma/leukemia. Adverse events and change in disease activity will be assessed. Epcoritamab is an investigational drug being developed for the treatment of relapsed/refractory aggressive mature B-cell neoplasms. Participants will receive subcutaneous (SC) of epcoritamab. Approximately 15 pediatric participants with a diagnosis of relapsed/refractory aggressive mature B-cell neoplasms and and young adult participants, ages of 18-25, with a diagnosis of Burkitt's or Burkitt-like lymphoma/leukemia will be enrolled at 50 sites globally. Participants will receive subcutaneous epcoritamab in 28-day cycles. Participants will be followed for a minimum of 3 years after enrollment. There may be higher treatment burden for participants in this trial compared to their standard of care. Participants will attend regular visits during the study at an approved institution (hospital or clinic). The effect of the treatment will be frequently checked by medical assessments, blood tests, questionnaires and side effects.

NCT ID: NCT04883437 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Mantle Cell Lymphoma

Acalabrutinib and Obinutuzumab for the Treatment of Previously Untreated Follicular Lymphoma or Other Indolent Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas

Start date: September 3, 2021
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial studies the effect of acalabrutinib and obinutuzumab in treating patients with follicular lymphoma or other indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma for which the patient has not received treatment in the past (previously untreated). Acalabrutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with obinutuzumab may induce changes in body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Giving acalabrutinib and obinutuzumab may kill more cancer cells.

NCT ID: NCT04464200 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

19(T2)28z1xx Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T Cells in People With B-Cell Cancers

Start date: July 6, 2020
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of this study is to test the safety of 19(T2)28z1xx CAR T cells in people with relapsed/refractory B-cell cancers. The researchers will try to find the highest dose of 19(T2)28z1xx CAR T cells that causes few or mild side effects in participants. Once they find this dose, they can test it in future participants to see if it is effective in treating their relapsed/refractory B-cell cell cancers. This study will also look at whether 19(T2)28z1xx CAR T cells work against participants' cancer.

NCT ID: NCT04372641 Withdrawn - Clinical trials for Metastatic Malignant Solid Neoplasm

Testing the Safety of CB-5339 in Patients With Cancer

Start date: June 18, 2020
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of CB-5339 in treating patients with solid tumors that has spread to other places in the body (advanced) or lymphomas. CB-5339 may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

NCT ID: NCT04323956 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

Parsaclisib Plus the Standard Drug Therapy in Patients With Newly Diagnosed, High Risk Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma

Start date: June 15, 2020
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This phase I/Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of parsaclisib plus the standard drug therapy (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin hydrochloride, vincristine sulfate, and prednisone [R-CHOP]) and to see how well they work compared with R-CHOP alone in treating patients with newly diagnosed, high risk diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Parsaclisib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Rituximab is a monoclonal antibody that may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin hydrochloride, and vincristine sulfate, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Anti-inflammatory drugs, such as prednisone, lower the body's immune response and are used with other drugs in the treatment of some types of cancer. It is not yet known if giving parsaclisib and R-CHOP together works better than R-CHOP alone in treating patients with high risk diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

NCT ID: NCT04298879 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Indolent Non-hodgkin Lymphoma

IBI376 in Relapsed or Refractory Follicular Lymphoma/Marginal Zone Lymphoma

Start date: April 7, 2020
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

A Phase 2, Multicenter, Open-Label Study of IBI376, a PI3Kδ Inhibitor, in Relapsed or Refractory Follicular Lymphoma/Marginal Zone Lymphoma

NCT ID: NCT04223765 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Mantle Cell Lymphoma

Study of Kappa Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T Lymphocytes Co-Expressing the Kappa and CD28 CARs for Relapsed/Refractory Kappa+ Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia/Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma.

Start date: November 12, 2020
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This study will combine both T cells and antibodies in order to create a more effective treatment. The treatment tested in this study uses modified T-cells called Autologous T Lymphocyte Chimeric Antigen Receptor (ATLCAR) cells targeted against the kappa light chain antibody on cancer cells. For this study, the anti-kappa light chain antibody has been changed so instead of floating free in the blood, a part of it is now joined to the T cells. Only the part of the antibody that sticks to the lymphoma cells is attached to the T cells. When an antibody is joined to a T cell in this way, it is called a chimeric receptor. The kappa light chain chimeric (combination) receptor-activated T cells are called ATLCAR.κ.28 cells. These cells may be able to destroy lymphoma cancer cells. They do not, however, last very long in the body so their chances of fighting the cancer are unknown. Previous studies have shown that a new gene can be put into T cells to increase their ability to recognize and kill cancer cells. A gene is a unit of DNA. Genes make up the chemical structure carrying your genetic information that may determine human characteristics (i.e., eye color, height and sex). The new gene that is put in the T cells in this study makes an antibody called an anti-kappa light chain. This anti-kappa light chain antibody usually floats around in the blood. The antibody can detect and stick to cancer cells called lymphoma cells because they have a substance on the outside of the cells called kappa light chains. The purpose of this study is to determine whether receiving the ATLCAR.κ.28 cells is safe and tolerable and learn more about the side effects and how effective these cells are in fighting lymphoma. Initially, the study doctors will test different doses of the ATLCAR.κ.28, to see which dose is safer for use in lymphoma patients. Once a safe dose is identified, the study team will administer this dose to more patients, to learn about how these cells affect lymphoma cancer cells and identify other side effects they might have on the body. This is the first time ATLCAR.κ.28 cells are given to patients with lymphoma. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), has not approved giving ATLCAR.κ.28 as treatment for lymphoma. This is the first step in determining whether giving ATLCAR.κ.28 to others with lymphoma in the future will help them.

NCT ID: NCT04136756 Recruiting - Multiple Myeloma Clinical Trials

NKTR-255 in Relapsed/Refractory Multiple Myeloma & Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Start date: October 7, 2019
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

Patients will receive intravenous (IV) NKTR-255 in 21 or 28 day treatment cycles. During the Part 1 dose escalation portion of the trial, patients will either receive NKTR-255 as monotherapy, NKTR-255 administered as a doublet with daratumumab subcutaneous (DARZALEX FASPRO TM), or NKTR-255 administered as a doublet with rituximab. After determination of the recommended Phase 2 dose (RP2D) of NKTR-255, NKTR-255 will be evaluated in Part 2. During the Part 2 dose expansion portion of the trial, patients will either receive NKTR-255 as monotherapy, NKTR-255 administered as a doublet with daratumumab subcutaneous (DARZALEX FASPRO TM), or NKTR-255 administered as a doublet with rituximab. This is a Phase 1 study to evaluate safety and tolerability of NKTR-255 alone and in combination with daratumumab or rituximab.