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Clinical Trial Summary

Stroke is responsible for about 7% of disabilities in the European population. Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) represents 15% of stroke cases in Europe. In order to avoid disabling sequelae, an essential role is played by early rehabilitation, which has also proved effective for ICH. In addition to its role in physical recovery, it plays a fundamental role in the psychological well-being of patients with ICH. Impairments in trunk function are a common sequela and are related to reduced mobility, balance and functional independence. Trunk exercises could improve trunk control, postural control, and functional recovery. The hypothesis is that a specific exercise program, based on core stability, will induce clinically significant and long-term improvements from the point of view of trunk control, and secondly in postural control, disability and quality of life in subjects with hemorrhagic stroke outcomes, versus general physiotherapy, and that these improvements will be maintained at least one year after the intervention.


Clinical Trial Description

Stroke is responsible for about 7% of disabilities in the European population, and in particular intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), whose mortality is higher than ischemic stroke, represents 15% of stroke cases in Europe. In order to avoid disabling sequelae, an essential role is played by early rehabilitation, which has also proved effective for ICH. Patients undergoing early rehabilitation within neurorehabilitation units achieve better clinical-functional outcomes than those who receive general medical care; furthermore, in addition to its role in physical recovery, it plays a fundamental role in the psychological well-being of patients with ICH, as these patients tend to be less depressed and anxious than those undergoing standard care. However, even after intensive rehabilitation functional deficits still exist, making stroke the leading cause of disability in adults globally. Impairments in trunk function, in particular, are a common sequelae and are related to reduced mobility, balance and functional independence. Therefore, impairments in trunk function can lead to limitations of activity and participation, as well as to increase the risk of falling resulting in further disability, hospitalization and mortality. The dysfunction of the core, which would significantly affect the function of the trunk, would seem to be linked to a reduction in muscle strength, to a delayed/asymmetrical activation of the muscles, as well as to proprioceptive alterations. Following this line, trunk exercises could then improve trunk control, postural control, and functional recovery. Looking at the literature, it has been seen how several randomized controlled trials have focused on the efficacy of trunk training in stroke populations with positive and encouraging results regarding the outcomes achieved within the experimental groups. However, these studies, in addition to including patients with both ischemic and haemorrhagic stroke, did not always equalize the amount of exercise provided with a control group, showing heterogeneity in the exercises administered, and did not consider whether the therapeutic efficacy observed at the end of the treatment is still maintained over the long term. The hypothesis is that a specific exercise program, based on core stability, will induce clinically significant and long-term improvements from the point of view of trunk control, and secondly in postural control, disability and quality of life in subjects with hemorrhagic stroke outcomes, versus general physiotherapy, and that these improvements will be maintained at least one year after the intervention. ;


Study Design


Related Conditions & MeSH terms


NCT number NCT05207345
Study type Interventional
Source University of Cagliari
Contact Marco Monticone, MD, PhD
Phone +390706753109
Email [email protected]
Status Not yet recruiting
Phase N/A
Start date February 1, 2022
Completion date June 30, 2023

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