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NCT ID: NCT05686070 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Acute Non-cardioembolic Ischemic Stroke

A Study to Learn More About Asundexian (Also Called BAY2433334) for Prevention of Ischemic Stroke in Male and Female Participants Aged 18 Years and Older Who Already Had Such a Stroke Due to a Blood Clot That Formed Outside the Heart and Travelled to the Brain, or Temporary Stroke-like Symptoms

OCEANIC-STROKE
Start date: February 16, 2023
Phase: Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

Researchers are looking for a better way to prevent an ischemic stroke which occurs when a blood clot travelled to the brain in people who within the last 72 hours had: - a stroke due to a blood clot that formed outside the heart (acute non-cardioembolic ischemic stroke), or - temporary stroke-like symptoms with a high risk of turning into a stroke (high-risk transient ischemic attack), and who are planned to receive standard of care therapy. Ischemic strokes or transient ischemic attacks result from a blocked or reduced blood flow to a part of the brain. They are caused by blood clots that travel to the brain and block the vessels that supply it. If these blood clots form elsewhere than in the heart, the stroke is called non-cardioembolic. People who already had a non-cardioembolic stroke are more likely to have another stroke. This is why they are treated preventively with an antiplatelet therapy, the current standard of care. Antiplatelet medicines prevent platelets, components of blood clotting, from clumping together. Anticoagulants are another type of medicine that prevents blood clots from forming by interfering with a process known as coagulation (or blood clotting). The study treatment asundexian is a new type of anticoagulant currently under development to provide further treatment options. The way it works, it aims to further improve the standard of care with regard to the risk of bleeding. The main purpose of this study is to learn whether asundexian works better than placebo at reducing ischemic strokes in participants who recently had a non-cardioembolic ischemic stroke or temporary stroke-like symptoms when given in addition to standard antiplatelet therapy. A placebo is a treatment that looks like a medicine but does not have any medicine in it. Another aim is to compare the occurrence of major bleeding events during the study between the asundexian and the placebo group. Major bleedings have a serious or even life-threatening impact on a person's health. Dependent on the treatment group, the participants will either take asundexian or placebo as tablets once a day for at least 3 months up to 31 months. Approximately every 3 months during the treatment period, either a phone call or a visit to the study site is scheduled on an alternating basis. In addition, one visit before and up to two visits after the treatment period are planned. During the study, the study team will: - Check vital signs such as blood pressure and heart rate - Examine the participants' heart health using an electrocardiogram (ECG) - Take blood samples - Ask the participants questions about how they are feeling and what adverse events they are having. An adverse event is any medical problem that a participant has during a study. Doctors keep track of all adverse events that happen in studies, even if they do not think the adverse events might be related to the study treatments. In addition, the participants will be asked to complete a questionnaire on quality of life at certain time points during the study.

NCT ID: NCT05649137 Recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

A Research Study to See How Semaglutide Helps People With Excess Weight and Type 2 Diabetes Lose Weight

Start date: January 4, 2023
Phase: Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

This study will look at how much weight participants will lose and how much blood sugar control they achieve from the start to the end of the study. The weight loss in participants taking the investigational high dose of semaglutide will be compared to the weight loss in people taking "dummy" medicine and a lower dose of semaglutide. In addition to taking the medicine, participants will have talks with study staff about healthy food choices and how to be more physically active. Participants will either get semaglutide or "dummy" medicine. Which treatment participants get is decided by chance. Participants are more likely (4 out of 5) to get semaglutide than the "dummy" medicine. The study medicine will be injected briefly, under skin, with a thin needle, typically in the stomach, thighs, or upper arms. After receiving first dose, the dose of semaglutide will be gradually increased until reaching the target dose. The study will last for about 1.5 years.

NCT ID: NCT05646706 Recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

A Research Study to See How Semaglutide Helps People With Excess Weight, Lose Weight (STEP UP)

STEP UP
Start date: January 4, 2023
Phase: Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

This study will look at how much weight participants will lose from the start to the end of the study. The weight loss in participants taking the investigational high dose of semaglutide will be compared to the weight loss in people taking "dummy" medicine and a lower dose of semaglutide. In addition to taking the medicine, participants will have talks with study staff about healthy food choices and how to be more physically active. Participants will either get semaglutide or "dummy" medicine. Which treatment participants get is decided by chance. Participants are more likely (4 out of 5) to get semaglutide than the "dummy" medicine. The study medicine will be injected briefly, under skin, with a thin needle, typically in the stomach, thighs, or upper arms. In the first part of the study, participants will get one injection once a week until they reach the planned dose. The second part of the study, which might last a couple of months, is a transition period, where participant will get three injections, taken right after each other, once a week. The duration of the study intervention (trial product and lifestyle intervention) will be 72 weeks followed by a 9-week follow-up period without study interventions.

NCT ID: NCT05644691 Completed - Atopic Dermatitis Clinical Trials

Impact of the Daily Use of Emollient on Corticosteroids Consumption in Patients With Atopic Dermatitis

Start date: October 14, 2020
Phase:
Study type: Observational

This study aims at assessing the reduction of consumption of corticosteroids (same mid-potent corticosteroids for all patients) afforded by the use of a specific emollient in comparison to the usual one in subjects suffering from atopic dermatitis.

NCT ID: NCT05643573 Recruiting - Atrial Fibrillation Clinical Trials

A Study to Learn How Well the Study Treatment Asundexian Works and How Safe it is Compared to Apixaban to Prevent Stroke or Systemic Embolism in People With Irregular and Often Rapid Heartbeat (Atrial Fibrillation), and at Risk for Stroke

OCEANIC-AF
Start date: December 5, 2022
Phase: Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

Researchers are looking for a better way to treat people with atrial fibrillation and prevent stroke or systemic embolism (blood clots travelling through the blood stream to plug another vessel). Atrial fibrillation is a condition of having irregular and often rapid heartbeat. It can lead to the formation of blood clots in the heart which can travel through the blood stream to plug another vessel, and like this lead to serious and life-threatening conditions, such as a stroke. A stroke occurs because the brain tissue beyond the blockage no longer receives nutrients and oxygen so that brain cells die. As strokes arising from atrial fibrillation can involve extensive areas of the brain, it is important to prevent them. Blood clots are formed in a process known as coagulation. Medications are already available to prevent the formation of blood clots. When taken by mouth (orally), they are known as oral anticoagulants (OACs) including apixaban. OACs decrease the risk of the above-mentioned serious and life-threatening conditions. The main side effect of OACs is an increase of the risk of bleeding. The study treatment asundexian is a new type of anticoagulant currently under development to provide further treatment options. The way it works, it aims to further improve the standard of care with regard to the risk of bleeding. The main purpose of this study is to collect more data about how well asundexian works to prevent stroke and systemic embolism and how safe it is compared to apixaban in people with atrial fibrillation and at high risk for stroke. To see how well the study treatment asundexian works researchers compare: - how long asundexian works well and - how long apixaban works well after the start of the treatment. Working well means that the treatments can prevent the following from happening: - stroke and/or - systemic embolism. The study will keep collecting data until a certain number of strokes or embolisms happen in the study. To see how safe asundexian is, the researchers will compare how often major bleedings occur after taking the study treatments asundexian and apixaban, respectively. Major bleedings are bleedings that have a serious or even life-threatening impact on a person's health. The study participants will be randomly (by chance) assigned to 1 of 2 treatment groups, A and B. Dependent on the treatment group, the participants will either take the study treatment asundexian by mouth once a day or apixaban by mouth twice a day for approximately 9 - 33 months. Each participant will be in the study for approximately 9 - 34 months. There will be visits to the study site every 3 to 6 months and up to 7 phone calls. Those participants who do not want or are unable to have visits to the study site may join the study remotely in selected countries. All visits for these participants will be done using electronic devices. During the study, the study team will: - take blood samples - do physical examinations - examine heart health using an electrocardiogram (ECG) - check vital signs such as blood pressure and heart rate - do pregnancy tests - ask the participants questions about their quality of life - ask the participants questions about how they are feeling and what adverse events they are having. An adverse event is any medical problem that a participant has during a study. Doctors keep track of all adverse events that happen in studies, even if they do not think the adverse events might be related to the study treatments.

NCT ID: NCT05637255 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Macular Degeneration

A Randomized, Double Masked, Parallel Group, Dose-finding Study to Evaluate SYL1801 in Patients With Neovascular Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD)

Start date: November 22, 2022
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

The goal of this clinical trial is to compare the safety and effect on visual acuity of three different doses of SYL1801 eye drops.

NCT ID: NCT05636176 Not yet recruiting - Heart Failure Clinical Trials

A Research Study to Look at How Ziltivekimab Works Compared to Placebo in People With Heart Failure and Inflammation

HERMES
Start date: May 8, 2023
Phase: Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

This study will be done to see if ziltivekimab can be used to treat people living with heart failure and inflammation. Participants will either get ziltivekimab or placebo. The study is expected to last for up to 4 years. Participants will have up to 20 clinic visits. Participants will have to use a study app on their phone to record and share information about all their injections of study medicine and to fill in questionnaires.

NCT ID: NCT05624450 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Acute Respiratory Failure

Efficacy and Safety of Tozorakimab in Patients Hospitalised for Viral Lung Infection Requiring Supplemental Oxygen

TILIA
Start date: December 13, 2022
Phase: Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of tozorakimab as an add-on to SoC in patients with viral lung infection requiring supplemental oxygen on the prevention of death or progression to IMV/ECMO.

NCT ID: NCT05601882 Recruiting - Atopic Dermatitis Clinical Trials

A Study to Evaluate Adverse Events and Change in Disease Activity Comparing Oral Upadacitinib to Subcutaneous Dupilumab in Adolescent and Adult Participants With Moderate to Severe Atopic Dermatitis

Level Up
Start date: November 28, 2022
Phase: Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a skin condition that may cause a rash and itching due to inflammation of the skin. Therapies spread over the skin may not be enough to control the AD in trial participants who require systemic anti-inflammatory treatment. This study compares upadacitinib to dupilumab in adolescent and adult participants with moderate to severe AD who have inadequate response to systemic therapies. Adverse events and change in the disease activity will be assessed. Upadacitinib and dupilumab are approved drugs for the treatment of moderate to severe atopic dermatitis (AD). The study is comprised of a 35-day Screening Period, a 16-week treatment period 1 and a 16-week treatment period 2. During period 1, participants are randomly assigned in 1 of 2 groups, called treatment arms to receive upadacitinib Dose A or dupilumab. In Period 2, participants will receive upadacitinib Dose A or Dose B. Approximately 880 adolescent and adult participants ages 12 to 64 with moderate to severe AD who are candidates for systemic therapy will be enrolled at up to 330 sites worldwide. Participants will receive upadacitinib oral tablets once daily or dupilumab as per its label for 32 weeks and followed for 30 days. There may be higher treatment burden for participants in this trial compared to their standard of care . Participants will attend regular visits during the study at a hospital or clinic. The effect of the treatment will be checked by medical assessments, blood tests, checking for side effects and completing questionnaires.

NCT ID: NCT05583227 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Eosinophilic Esophagitis

Efficacy and Safety of Tezepelumab in Patients With Eosinophilic Esophagitis

CROSSING
Start date: November 10, 2022
Phase: Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled multicenter, phase 3 study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of tezepelumab administered subcutaneously (SC) using an accessorized pre-filled syringe (APFS) versus placebo in adult and adolescent patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE).